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Siding nail guns

Viewing 9 posts - 41 through 49 (of 49 total)
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  • #687134
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    How narrow a crown? 1/4 wide 1″ deep?

    For siding nailer I see Bostich makes one that doubles has a roof sheathing gun. Not sure why they are the only manufacturer of this. I would like that option. I use a stick framer and when it comes to sheathing I would rather have the round nose piece not digging into the plywood.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #687167
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We have put up miles of aluminum soffit with the 18ga narrow crown stapler, never use vinyl soffit. I would guess it would work well as long as it is warm out, in the cold for us, it would just crack the soffit. Depth of drive would be important as you don’t punch through the soffit

    With vinyl we don’t hard nail it. So the wide works better to leave it move around.

    #687191
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Alright, not to beat a dead horse……here’s feedback

    So I booked bought a HBR FR 18 ga narrow crown staple gun for $25.
    In hope I could get multiple opportunities to use it.

    Well because we are using economy grade vinyl soffit I was getting some shattering even though it’s hot out.
    I found a delicate was if doing it with better results but still slow. Dropping pressure to 85 psi was a little bit better but as of right now I don’t think it’s saving me time.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #687222
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    not to beat a dead horse

    Well that’s why I’ve always used the wide crown. It doesn’t punch through the vinyl. One leg goes in the slot and the other leg goes above the slot. The vinyl needs to move. The nose part of the gun has a small finger to tug the vinyl snug before shooting it.

    #687628
    CB
    Spectator

    when it comes to sheathing I would rather have the round nose piece not digging into the plywood.

    I use an NR83A for sheathing with a nose piece accessory that very effectively covers the aggressively sharp toenailing claw-like cleats of the factory nose piece.

    The accessory nose piece is an aftermarket item. I have a couple of them. They include two different options to mount them… wing bolts or allen set screws, and I always use the allen set screws (much more secure).

    The accessory nose piece not only prevents the scarring of the sheathing, it also increases the firing distance of the nail within the protective column of the original nose piece and additional nose piece accessory. The slightly increased firing distance consumes some of the driving pin’s energy, which reduces over driving the nail, and prevents the nail head perimeter breaking the outer skin of the sheathing… something inspectors around here look for.

    So the accessory nose piece facilitates perfect flush nailing, while maintaining high enough air pressure feeding the gun to get rapid recycle rates (instead of dialing the supply pressure down to reduce overdriving). And, the accessory nose piece prevents cleat scarring, which is useful when the sheathing panel serves dual purpose as the visible siding.

    And the best part is that I get to continue to use the NR83A gun that I know and love, rather than some other gun that I don’t have as familiar of a feel and affinity for.

    $10 bucks for an accessory nose piece, vs $300 for a new siding nailer, just for a rounded tip? To me the choice was clear, and made over two decades ago. And today, I see that the same accessory nose piece is still available, albeit for even cheaper, and from many copy cat vendors from overseas. It does the job though.

    (Not related to vinyl siding installation)

    #687640
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    when it comes to sheathing I would rather have the round nose piece not digging into the plywood.

    I use an NR83A for sheathing with a nose piece accessory that very effectively covers the aggressively sharp toenailing claw-like cleats of the factory nose piece.

    The accessory nose piece is an aftermarket item. I have a couple of them. They include two different options to mount them… wing bolts or allen set screws, and I always use the allen set screws (much more secure).

    The accessory nose piece not only prevents the scarring of the sheathing, it also increases the firing distance of the nail within the protective column of the original nose piece and additional nose piece accessory. The slightly increased firing distance consumes some of the driving pin’s energy, which reduces over driving the nail, and prevents the nail head perimeter breaking the outer skin of the sheathing… something inspectors around here look for.

    So the accessory nose piece facilitates perfect flush nailing, while maintaining high enough air pressure feeding the gun to get rapid recycle rates (instead of dialing the supply pressure down to reduce overdriving). And, the accessory nose piece prevents cleat scarring, which is useful when the sheathing panel serves dual purpose as the visible siding.

    And the best part is that I get to continue to use the NR83A gun that I know and love, rather than some other gun that I don’t have as familiar of a feel and affinity for.

    $10 bucks for an accessory nose piece, vs $300 for a new siding nailer, just for a rounded tip? To me the choice was clear, and made over two decades ago. And today, I see that the same accessory nose piece is still available, albeit for even cheaper, and from many copy cat vendors from overseas. It does the job though.

    (Not related to vinyl siding installation)

    So you use framing nails for siding? We don’t do that here. We use siding nails for siding. Most all of us that have a framing gun have a way to flush nail with it even if it’s just slipping a water bottle to on it.

    #687688
    CB
    Spectator

    So you use framing nails for siding? We don’t do that here. We use siding nails for siding.

    Did you read that I used framing nails for installing siding?

    It is baffling how that could possibly be even remotely construed from what I actually did say, which is that I use the NR83A nailer for installing sheathing and siding, and specifically excluded vinyl siding from my remarks, because I don’t and won’t do vinyl siding.

    I recall you have a couple of NR83A nail guns, so I’m going to give every benefit of the doubt that you know what these guns can shoot. But for the benefit of anyone else reading this thread, a photo of the specifications of the NR83A nail gun is posted below, which shows the range of nails this gun is designed to shoot, which includes the shorter lengths and smaller diameters typical of siding nails.

    As the screenshot photo didn’t reproduce that clearly, the length range includes 2″, 2 1/4″, 2 3/8″, 2 1/2″, 3″… all lengths that are decidedly shorter than “framing” nails, and are consistent with the lengths of most siding nails sold in bulk, coils, or 21 degree strips, which is what the NR83A uses.

    Likewise, the diameters can be as small as .113, so the typical 2 3/8″ ring shank hot dip galvanized .113 siding nail in 21 degree strips found at every Home Depot under the DeWalt as well as the Grip Rite brands, and under the Hitachi brand name at Lowe’s, all manufactured in Oman or China, will work in the NR83A.

    I prefer Tree Island Halsteel nails made in USA, not just due to patriotism, but due to simple bending tests that I have conducted between the cases of nails. The made in China nails sold under the DeWalt brand fatigue to failure (separation) within 1.5 to 2.5 max 180 degree bends. By comparison, the Halsteel nails of the same diameter and length do not fatigue to failure until 5.5 to 6.5 similar 180 degree bends.

    Where codes in California require full 8D sheathing nails, once again the NR83A is rated and designed to fire the 2 1/2″ .131 diameter siding nails sold in 21 degree strips available at all the same stores mentioned.

    The notion of using framing nails to attach siding is so completely far fetched, it is perplexing how that conclusion could possibly have been arrived at, unless the intent was something other than being helpful.

    My purpose for posting about the metal nose piece accessory was to share how helpful and reliable I found it to be in my installation of sheathing and siding using an NR83A nailgun loaded with siding nails.

    #687789
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    So you use framing nails for siding? We don’t do that here. We use siding nails for siding.

    Oh Nice Edit,,,,
    I don’t know what you are trying to show me here??
    We hang the siding with the framing gun and framing nails then shoot the field, exposed stainless steel nails with the siding gun. We must use 2 different nails here for that. See pic below where I have 2 guns in use at the same time. I even Have an old Bostich coil nailer if I need big SS nails, The bostich SS nails are the cheapest I can get here.

    #687915
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    My stick framer had a nose piece when I first got it that you can take off and put on but of course it’s lost now.

    Either way even with the softer adjustment and a nose piece it’s not quite the same I’m a pick one up on Craigslist used or something just to have once in awhile when you really need.

    FYI I did end up buying a cheap HB staple gun for like 25 bucks I was impressed and just how well it worked.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

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