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shop built Jigs and templates

Viewing 20 posts - 81 through 100 (of 140 total)
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  • #361185
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I love the adjustable outfeed table that Norm builds in this episode. In fact, all three of the projects in this episode are on my list, once the shop is fully set up.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/nhRsjQxvRMM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    have you ever noticed that while watching his videos if he needs to do something, he always has the perfect tools/jigs whatever dodads for it.

    #361257

    LOL @r-ice. Yep, it was very noticeable. No clutter in his shop, and everything under the sun that you could ever need to do the job. Still though, it was a good watch for a lot of years!

    I love the adjustable outfeed table that Norm builds in this episode. In fact, all three of the projects in this episode are on my list, once the shop is fully set up.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/nhRsjQxvRMM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    have you ever noticed that while watching his videos if he needs to do something, he always has the perfect tools/jigs whatever dodads for it.

    #361289
    Arisshill
    Pro
    Ariss, ON

    Most used jig – Crosscut sled.

    Most recent jig – jig for cutting sheet metal for building the excavator scoop for a kids sandbox playset.

    I don’t end up feeling bad about scrapping a jig, no different that lumber cut-offs.

    Scott

    #361304
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Most used jig – Crosscut sled.

    Most recent jig – jig for cutting sheet metal for building the excavator scoop for a kids sandbox playset.

    I don’t end up feeling bad about scrapping a jig, no different that lumber cut-offs.



    @Arisshill
    – Welcome to BTP Scott! We have a little introduction thread if you feel like telling us a bit about yourself: http://bethepro.com/forums/topic/introduce-yourself-v2/

    Enjoy the forum!

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #361321

    I build them quite regularly, as opposed to buying them from the manufacturer. Its all about saving time and repeatability.

    Cross cut sleds make squaring up panels a breeze and save a ton of time on setups. Great jig!

    Welcome to BTP!

    Most used jig – Crosscut sled.

    Most recent jig – jig for cutting sheet metal for building the excavator scoop for a kids sandbox playset.

    I don’t end up feeling bad about scrapping a jig, no different that lumber cut-offs.

    #361491
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Cross cut sleds make squaring up panels a breeze and save a ton of time on setups. Great jig!

    Agreed, most useful jig in my shop. I’m also using my L-fence a lot lately.

    And welcome to BTP, Scott. We’re close to being neighbours.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #361539
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Cross cut sleds make squaring up panels a breeze and save a ton of time on setups. Great jig!

    Agreed, most useful jig in my shop. I’m also using my L-fence a lot lately.

    And welcome to BTP, Scott. We’re close to being neighbours.

    I also use my crosscut sled a lot.



    @smallerstick
    . What’s an L -Fence?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #361548
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Cross cut sleds make squaring up panels a breeze and save a ton of time on setups. Great jig!

    Agreed, most useful jig in my shop. I’m also using my L-fence a lot lately.

    And welcome to BTP, Scott. We’re close to being neighbours.

    I also use my crosscut sled a lot.

    @smallerstick. What’s an L -Fense?

    An L-fence clamps to your TS fence and lets you fine tune rabbets, cut off moulded edges and a whole lot of other stuff.

    Also good for cutting to a pattern. Offcuts stay under the fence; the pattern rides on the fence.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    Attachments:
    #361599

    Great for making bevel cuts also. My unifence allows me to remove the extrusion and change the profile of the fence to a low profile, suitable for ripping thin material. The L-fence works wonders for that too.

    Cross cut sleds make squaring up panels a breeze and save a ton of time on setups. Great jig!

    Agreed, most useful jig in my shop. I’m also using my L-fence a lot lately.

    And welcome to BTP, Scott. We’re close to being neighbours.

    I also use my crosscut sled a lot.

    @smallerstick. What’s an L -Fense?

    An L-fence clamps to your TS fence and lets you fine tune rabbets, cut off moulded edges and a whole lot of other stuff.

    Also good for cutting to a pattern. Offcuts stay under the fence; the pattern rides on the fence.

    #361601
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Well that’s interesting…any links for a good version to build?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #361612

    Here you go @jponto07

    #361675
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I love the adjustable outfeed table that Norm builds in this episode. In fact, all three of the projects in this episode are on my list, once the shop is fully set up.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/nhRsjQxvRMM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    have you ever noticed that while watching his videos if he needs to do something, he always has the perfect tools/jigs whatever dodads for it.

    It’s not his shop he shot the show out of. It was the shop of the shows producer Russ Morash.

    #361927
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I love the adjustable outfeed table that Norm builds in this episode. In fact, all three of the projects in this episode are on my list, once the shop is fully set up.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/nhRsjQxvRMM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    have you ever noticed that while watching his videos if he needs to do something, he always has the perfect tools/jigs whatever dodads for it.

    It’s not his shop he shot the show out of. It was the shop of the shows producer Russ Morash.

    I wonder what his home shop would look like, has there ever been a video based on if he has a shop at home?

    #361943
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I wonder what his home shop would look like, has there ever been a video based on if he has a shop at home?

    Not that I’m aware of.

    #361949

    It’s not his shop he shot the show out of. It was the shop of the shows producer Russ Morash.

    Not sure if this is correct but I heard that he was also the producer of “This Old House” and he got the idea for NYWS from seeing Norm on that show…..the rest is history.

    Still have every episode and a few of his books. Worth going through periodically.

    #362014
    Doobie
    Moderator

    It’s not his shop he shot the show out of. It was the shop of the shows producer Russ Morash.

    Not sure if this is correct but I heard that he was also the producer of “This Old House” and he got the idea for NYWS from seeing Norm on that show…..the rest is history.

    Still have every episode and a few of his books. Worth going through periodically.

    I do vaguely recall that it was from him appearing on TOH that he originally started.

    I think he did 17 seasons. Quite a run!

    Miss Norm! 🙁

    We don’t really have anything like him on TV any longer. Sad. All the how-to shows are little on how to actually do things and more about drama among participants. Truly sad!

    #362023
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Welcome to BTP Scott. You will find we are friendly bunch.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #362074
    keltorak
    Pro
    Gatineau, QC

    At this point, I don’t have permanent jigs, though I’m planning a circle cutting jig for my router for a project I’ve got in mind.

    I’ve got a pile of offcuts and small chunks of plywood I reuse as needed by building temporary jigs.

    If my shop does not get taken over by my boys’ sport equipment, I may yet get a table saw in there and many jigs would follow.

    #362087
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    At this point, I don’t have permanent jigs, though I’m planning a circle cutting jig for my router for a project I’ve got in mind.

    I’ve got a pile of offcuts and small chunks of plywood I reuse as needed by building temporary jigs.

    If my shop does not get taken over by my boys’ sport equipment, I may yet get a table saw in there and many jigs would follow.



    @keltorak
    , welcome to BTP! There is a ton of information here and a lot of good folks – we look forward to hearing more from you.

    If you get a chance, we have a thread for new members to introduce themselves here: http://bethepro.com/forums/topic/introduce-yourself-v2/

    And please take a minute to go over the forum rules: http://bethepro.com/forums/topic/the-rules-of-bethepro-please-read-before-posting/

    Thanks!

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #402052

    We are doing our HVAC vents in toe kicks routing grooves instead of using a metal grate. I have posted pics of a few. After seeing @asevereid do his horizontal I knew that is how we would start doing ours. I have always done the layout on site and made a quick, rough jig to complete the task.

    I had some time today and decided it was time to make a permanent jig to do this. I wanted something simple, portable, and fool proof. All of our toe kicks are 1/4″ ply that get nailed/glued over the cabinet’s rough toe after installation.

    I had some 3/4 melamine scraps so that is what I used for the base. I made it 18″x30″. Next we had some 1/4 mdf that I used to build up the edges leaving a 4″ space for the toe kick material.

    I used my new Bosch router with plunge base as the reference size for sizing the guide. I use a 1/4″ bit when I do this and put the grooves on 1/2″ centers. I did some careful layout and made the guide to accomodate accordingly.

    Once the guide was complete I had to come up with a way to move it in 1/2″ increments simply. I ended up drilling 5mm holes in four spots through the guide into the base. Then I used 5mm shelf pins to hold it in place. After those were drilled I laid out the rest of the holes in 1/2″ increments. For our vent routing I split a 2×12 into two sections. I set up the guide to do one half of the vent, moving it each step, and then move it over to the next side and repeat the steps.

    It was taking me around 45-60 minutes to layout, fabricate the site jig, and route the toekick. It took me about an hour to make this permanent jig and 5 minutes to route the toe so this will definitely save serious time when doing these from now on.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

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