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shop built Jigs and templates

  • This topic has 139 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 5 years ago by RonW.
Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 140 total)
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  • #300856
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    One thing I do NOT like about jigs I make is trying to store them all. I hate destroying something I may need one day again, and some jigs just took too much time and effort to just toss once no longer needed.

    I’m getting to that point too. I may need to come up with a new storage setup for mine. They are quickly outgrowing the shelf I’ve been using. My table saw crosscut sled lives on the saw or standing on its side next to the saw due to its size.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #300868
    Doobie
    Moderator

    One thing I do NOT like about jigs I make is trying to store them all. I hate destroying something I may need one day again, and some jigs just took too much time and effort to just toss once no longer needed.

    I’m getting to that point too. I may need to come up with a new storage setup for mine. They are quickly outgrowing the shelf I’ve been using. My table saw crosscut sled lives on the saw or standing on its side next to the saw due to its size.

    I got rid of mine years ago after I added the Jessem Mast-R-Slide to replace my left Unisaw wing. That thing is awesome. Stays true as well. The old CC Sled just ate too much room in that area for me. My shop is in a one car garage, so space is tight.

    #300877

    This isn’t a shop built jig but something I made in the field quick. My partner had a great idea for the vent that blows out under the cabinet on our last project. We used to just cut a 2×12 hole and face screw on a metal vent over the toekick.

    We started doing this and it is much cleaner. I made the jig and use a router on site. It took about 15 minutes to make the jig, 5 minutes to do the layout, and 10 minutes to route it.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #301013
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    This isn’t a shop built jig but something I made in the field quick.

    For repetitive work nothing beats a jig. It results in faster more professional looking work.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #301019
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    This isn’t a shop built jig but something I made in the field quick. My partner had a great idea for the vent that blows out under the cabinet on our last project. We used to just cut a 2×12 hole and face screw on a metal vent over the toekick.

    We started doing this and it is much cleaner. I made the jig and use a router on site. It took about 15 minutes to make the jig, 5 minutes to do the layout, and 10 minutes to route it.

    Good idea. It does look better than using a vent cover.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #301065
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    This isn’t a shop built jig but something I made in the field quick. My partner had a great idea for the vent that blows out under the cabinet on our last project. We used to just cut a 2×12 hole and face screw on a metal vent over the toekick.

    We started doing this and it is much cleaner. I made the jig and use a router on site. It took about 15 minutes to make the jig, 5 minutes to do the layout, and 10 minutes to route it.

    When you put a vent in the toe kick of a cabinet do you duct the air up to the toe kick or just let it blow around under the cabinet until it escapes through the vent? My house has several vents done this way and there is no more than a penetration through the floor under the cabinet and a grille screwed to toe kick.

    No idea if this is the norm, as my house has a number of things the building inspectors “missed” when it was built in ’06. It seems inefficient to me, but I’d bet it would be a pain to fit ductwork under a cabinet.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #301068
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I always extend a homemade extension ring for the duct so it is not wasted under the kick. I end up with more toe kick heaters than ducts but I do the same for both.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #301088

    <P>This isn’t a shop built jig but something I made in the field quick. My partner had a great idea for the vent that blows out under the cabinet on our last project. We used to just cut a 2×12 hole and face screw on a metal vent over the toekick.</P>
    <P>We started doing this and it is much cleaner. I made the jig and use a router on site. It took about 15 minutes to make the jig, 5 minutes to do the layout, and 10 minutes to route it. </P>

    <P>When you put a vent in the toe kick of a cabinet do you duct the air up to the toe kick or just let it blow around under the cabinet until it escapes through the vent? My house has several vents done this way and there is no more than a penetration through the floor under the cabinet and a grille screwed to toe kick. </P>
    <P>No idea if this is the norm, as my house has a number of things the building inspectors “missed” when it was built in ’06. It seems inefficient to me, but I’d bet it would be a pain to fit ductwork under a cabinet.</P>

    Yup mine presently just blow under the cabints, I find it’s a waste as well. when I start to redo the washroom upstairs I will correct that, and as for the kitchen, I will try to get a 90 degree fit to bring the air to the vent. @overanylize , I like what you have done ,sure looks nicer than the plastic grill, your way makes it look as it should.

    #301536
    crotalusco
    Pro
    west bend, wi

    sweet jig but ya run the duct to the front i would think

    #301540

    Thanks guys! It is my new favorite way.



    @jponto07
    most times it is just the duct under the cabinet. We have made some aluminum scoops before to help direct the air out the front better. There isn’t that big of a difference to be honest. Certainly not wrong either way.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #302602
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    @overanalyze

    does the cross board move along? Do you just pin nail it down?

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #302755
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    This isn’t a shop built jig but something I made in the field quick. My partner had a great idea for the vent that blows out under the cabinet on our last project. We used to just cut a 2×12 hole and face screw on a metal vent over the toekick.

    We started doing this and it is much cleaner. I made the jig and use a router on site. It took about 15 minutes to make the jig, 5 minutes to do the layout, and 10 minutes to route it.

    Very clean looking.

    #303093

    @overanalyze

    does the cross board move along? Do you just pin nail it down?

    The last couple I have done I just made the jig onsite out of some scrap, did the layout, and used the pin nailer for the edge guide. Then I would pop it off and move it to the next mark.

    I think we will continue to do these so I am going to make a nicer, permanent jig. I have some ideas in my head and will share them once I build it.



    @thedude306

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #303268
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    OA I think doing vents like that results in a cleaner appearance.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #306526
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Here are the jigs I have for working doors – they are pretty basic but they work well. I used to have leather patches on the bottom rests but they wore out and I have never got around to replacing them. I need to modify them to work on my DeWalt sawhorses since I rarely carry the fold up aluminum ones anymore.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #306575

    Nice simple setup @ChadM. Looks like it works well and with the plywood on the horses you have a nice spot to place all the tools you need. Nicely done! Do you have a template for the hinges or do you rough them out with the router and finish them by hand?

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #306585
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Nice simple setup @ChadM. Looks like it works well and with the plywood on the horses you have a nice spot to place all the tools you need. Nicely done! Do you have a template for the hinges or do you rough them out with the router and finish them by hand?

    I have a router template that I use for hinges and for the latch bolt – much quicker and neater than doing it by hand.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #306590

    Nice simple setup @ChadM. Looks like it works well and with the plywood on the horses you have a nice spot to place all the tools you need. Nicely done! Do you have a template for the hinges or do you rough them out with the router and finish them by hand?

    I have a router template that I use for hinges and for the latch bolt – much quicker and neater than doing it by hand.

    Agree! Did you make them or buy them?

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #306774
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Great idea for holding doors Chad.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #306778
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Nice simple setup @ChadM. Looks like it works well and with the plywood on the horses you have a nice spot to place all the tools you need. Nicely done! Do you have a template for the hinges or do you rough them out with the router and finish them by hand?

    I have a router template that I use for hinges and for the latch bolt – much quicker and neater than doing it by hand.

    Agree! Did you make them or buy them?

    I bought them. I have some Porter-Cable templates (a set of the plastic ones and one of the heavy duty metal ones) an old Rockwell set, and a Ryobi that is surprisingly nice to use.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

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