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Sears – Business Updates

This topic contains 201 replies, has 47 voices, and was last updated by  Doobie 4 days, 5 hours ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 141 through 160 (of 202 total)
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  • #709936

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The Sears store in my town closed today. 41 years and it closed. The end of an era. Bought a lot of stuff from the store over the years appliances, tools, hardware, clothes. Hard to see it close.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #709949

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    The Sears store in my town closed today. 41 years and it closed. The end of an era. Bought a lot of stuff from the store over the years appliances, tools, hardware, clothes. Hard to see it close.

    I am sure it is hard to see it close. The same thing happen to store near me a year.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #709972

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    This is yet another reason why I don’t see the value in the Craftsman name. Today’s generation could give zero figs about their father’s oldsmobile. They want the solution as cheap as possible, and furthermore, the actual people who are the ones working with tools nowadays have little to no historical or cultural connection to the “tradition” of Craftsman.

    Well, SDB is betting there are enough people still “connected” to the “tradition” of Craftsman.

    This is a recent communication from SDB about Craftsman.

    “The odds are that CRAFTSMAN® made the first tools you remember. Were you the proud helper, first learning the difference between a Phillips and flat-head screwdriver? Or were you keeping that prized Mustang sounding as powerful as it looked? The pride is as enduring as the brand you trust.” #WEBUILDPRIDE

    May be everyone knows CM is selling Made In China run of the mill tools, may be not. It’s all marketing.

    #709990

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    This is yet another reason why I don’t see the value in the Craftsman name. Today’s generation could give zero figs about their father’s oldsmobile. They want the solution as cheap as possible, and furthermore, the actual people who are the ones working with tools nowadays have little to no historical or cultural connection to the “tradition” of Craftsman.

    Well, SDB is betting there are enough people still “connected” to the “tradition” of Craftsman.

    This is a recent communication from SDB about Craftsman.

    “The odds are that CRAFTSMAN® made the first tools you remember. Were you the proud helper, first learning the difference between a Phillips and flat-head screwdriver? Or were you keeping that prized Mustang sounding as powerful as it looked? The pride is as enduring as the brand you trust.” #WEBUILDPRIDE

    May be everyone knows CM is selling Made In China run of the mill tools, may be not. It’s all marketing.

    growing up, my father had Craftsman Circular saws, routers, sanders, Table Saw and many other tools. They were all bought back in the 50’5 and 60’s and were decent tools. back then Sears stores were everywhere and they also still had a sizable mail order business. In small town America, that was where you got your tools. Your only other option was the B & D from the local hardware store or possibly a Skill. Craftsman was the best option of the three. Lumberyards did not carry much for tools if anything because they focused on lumber mostly. Milwaukee was the tool of choice for larger contractors and they were only available at industrial supply houses.

    It was not until the late 70’s and early 80’s that the “Home center concept” came to be and the lumberyards added hardware and tools to their wares. This was about the same time Makita came around and made big inroads to the contractors toolboxes by going through the home centers. A few years later, B & D industrial came out then eventually changed their name to Dewalt and the rest is history.

    But in the end, Middle America really did grow up on Craftsman tools because, at the time, they were the best and most available to those areas.

    #710071

    CB
    Pro

    It wasn’t because Craftsman was all that great. It’s because Craftsman was all there was that was conveniently available and accessible. Craftsman won America’s heart by simply showing up and being there.

    I remember my neighbor needed a new captive air tank for their well pump. I was able to go to Sears, order an 80 gallon captive air tank, and pick it up a week later. And that was only 30 years ago, which isn’t that long ago, in the timeline covered by this conversation.

    There simply was no other local store where I could do this.

    #710106

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Sears were also Amazon back then. You can order an entire house from their catalog and have it delivered.

    I still have one CM table saw in my garage. That thing is like 50 years old and weights a lot. It still have a CM dust bag that my wife re-stitched it’s bottom seam twice.

    #710117

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Just read that Sears Holdings have turned down the offer by its Chairman Lampert to buy the assets of Sears and keep it going. The judge hasn’t ruled yet and everything is confidential and just ‘leaked’ info at this point, but it doesn’t look good.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/international-business/us-business/article-sears-to-ask-judge-for-permission-to-liquidate-as-chairmans-takeover/

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #710131

    CB
    Pro

    That Sears was able to sell Craftsman at all, let alone for nearly a billion… and that Craftsman was considered the crown jewel brand of Sears worthy of such value… is proof enough that (Lambert?) wrecked Sears years ago with the campaign “Come see the softer side of Sears”.

    The softer side of Sears was selling clothing. And combined with this ad campaign to try and reposition Sears as a clothing store, Sears jettisoned the “harder” side of tools, hardware, home, and garden. In the stores around me, they literally reduced the square footage of tools/hardware/home/garden by 2/3’s.

    Previously, I knew the entire lower floor of Sears as well as I knew my own shop. Then one day I hear on the radio the jingle “Come see the softer side of Sears” and think nothing of it. Until I needed an 8 point socket on a Sunday. I walked in to a sea of clothing. Really? How many different articles of clothing can all of humanity wear? Especially when every other store in that shopping mall was a clothing store, apart from the food court.

    With anchor tenants like JC Penny’s on one end of the mall, and Macy’s in the middle, along with every type of Ross, Gap, Hilfinger, and dozens of other brands of clothing stores inbetween, what was Sears thinking? That we needed yet another clothing store?

    I think that softer side of Sears was the final death knell of mismanagement of what at one time was the heart of America. The hard and hardy heart.

    #710135

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I think this Lampert guy was bleeding out this company and it is actually one of the things that the creditors are looking at is to recoup some money from the assets he sold in that last few years like the Craftsman line/name.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #710137

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    It really sounds like it will go into liquidation. The largest ever.

    The end of an American Icon after 126 years.

    #710142

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    The end of an American Icon after 126 years.

    It’s darn sad. You get this weird sense of failure as a consumer for some reason. But it’s not our fault. This company, and others that have suffered a similar fate and I’m sure more to follow in the future, failed to adapt to ‘us’, the consumer who changes over time with what we want or perceive of retailers.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #710144

    CB
    Pro

    America has lost retail icons before. These are just a few of the better known nationwide retailers that I once took for “granite”, that were later liquidated

    – Montgomery Wards

    – Woolworths

    – Emporium Capwells

    – WhiteFront

    – Gemco

    – Gaberdines

    – Mervyns

    – Rochester

    – Best (Not Best Buy, but the Best store where there was only one item on display, and you wrote down the number if you wanted it, and then took your list of numbers to the cashier and paid for them, whereupon your order would then be pulled from the back stock by way of complex conveyor belt system)

    And here are a few more home improvement focused stores with shorter life spans…

    – Home Express

    – HomeBase

    – The Good Guys (appliances, liquidated in the USA, but still active in Australia, with dozens of stores throughout that continent)

    – YardBirds

    – Orchard Supply Hardware (a chain that stood on it’s own for 80 years, then was bought by Sears, then bought by Lowes, now shuttered this year)

    One by one, the long burning torches that for decades lit our way down Main street… have been extinguished by the winds of change and the whims of business bankers making the decisions… leaving only reminders of the temporal nature of all things, no matter how seemingly secure.

    #710149

    redwood
    Pro

    For some reason, I was never a Craftsman tool buyer. No reason that I can think of. Certainly for not lack of exposure. Sears and their catalogs were all around me. Perhaps because my dad didn’t really have tools that I know of. My first real experiences with tools were with the contractors that I worked for in HS and a little beyond. They didn’t have Craftsman tools and when I ventured out on my own, I gravitated to the tools my bosses had used, Skill, Milwaukee, ect. Even Black and Decker, which were decent tools back them.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #710150

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Lets not forget

    Circut City

    Home Quarters

    Builders Square

    Payless Cashways / Knox / Arrow building centers

    Toys R US

    Unfortunately many of these and those named above left a carnage of empty storefronts on Mainstreet America in the wake of their growth and then with their demise, a hole in the retail options for towns that could only be filled by the internet.

    #710153

    redwood
    Pro

    Thinking about all these institutions going out of business, really makes me feel bad. I feel partially responsible, as I was a very early adaptor to using the internet for purchases. Many of my purchases were made on Ebay, when it first started up and there were actually deals to be had.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #710163

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    In reality, I think It was the businesses that did not evolve with the times. I think many failed to see the opportunities on online commerce and to fight it.

    Some were just poor operators in their space or just had poor business plans.

    With sears and Kmart doing their expansions in the 60’s and 70’s and Target and Walmart doing theirs in the 80’s and 90’s or later, cities, traffic patterns and the suburbs had moved past sears and Kmart by the time the others expanded, allowing them better locations where the population was growing.

    Kmart started their downfall in the mid 90’s shortly after I left there. They were burning cash trying to upgrade stores and doing a very poor job at it. Their problem was their locations were old, poorly maintained and just dingy in general. It was not the bright cheery place to shop that target was or their other competitors.

    Sears while being the original mail order king, lost it in the age of the internet and their attempts to gain legitimacy were to little to late. I will have to respectfully disagree with CB, their Softer side of Sears Campaign was probably to late to save them, They already had a reputation sa the old stodgy retail when they brought it out. Having been around retail for a lot of years building stores and my wife spending almost 25 years in retail management, The private label soft goods are where the money is at. In one retailer she worked for the private label apparel and other products had margins that were 100% or greater. It is the hard goods, especially name brand, where the margins were skinny. I would suspect that Sears had good margins on its Craftsman and Kenmore lines but could not sell enough of them. At one point Sears sold almost 1/2 of the appliances sold in the US.

    In the end, it is sad to see them go, but when you do not adapt with changing times, that is what happens. At some point as we all get to old to learn new tricks, it will happen to us also.

    #710168

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Thinking about all these institutions going out of business, really makes me feel bad. I feel partially responsible, as I was a very early adaptor to using the internet for purchases. Many of my purchases were made on Ebay, when it first started up and there were actually deals to be had.

    I wouldn’t blame yourself,, It’s all part of the new world order and will be very hard to fight off. Amazon just hit a all time high. Bigger than Apple and Microsoft.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #710169

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Don’t forget RADIO SHACK.

    Closed over 1000 stores this year. Pretty much just the corporate shell and some dealers left.

    #710175

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Don’t forget RADIO SHACK.

    Closed over 1000 stores this year. Pretty much just the corporate shell and some dealers left.

    Yup,, all the radio shacks around here are gone too.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #710197

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    At one point Sears sold almost 1/2 of the appliances sold in the US.

    I recall reading when Lowes came to Canada that they were the second largest appliance seller in the US at the time behind Sears. They must have passed them at some point since then and have been numero uno for years now.

    What was curious when Lowes announced opening up here in Canada in the mid 2000s or so was that HD, which had been here since around the late 80s or early 90s never sold appliances here in Canada. As soon as Lowes announced they were to open up here in Canada with about 14 stores to start, HD suddenly started selling the large appliances here too months before Lowes officially opened their first store here.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

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