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safety standards and jobsite practices

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  • #467806
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    talk about practices you guys have on your sites, and freakish incidents with saftey officers whom have tried forcing things on you which are no where to be found within the saftey regulations

    last spring we were shut down for improper scaffold.. the safety guy tried stating that we didnt have the base of our staging correct.. it had to be on 2×10 planks which are perfectly level fist and the legs are fastened down to them… by levelling the planks he stated that we had to dig out under hte plank so its level and flat.. they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs.. not possible when nowhere in our contract with the home owner does it state we will be doing landscaping…. and theres 2 ft of grade drop off

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #467815
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    That’s just plain crazy. Sounds like your safety guy is power tripping.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #467854
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs..

    Okay..why the heck not? Leveling legs seem to be the solution here.

    I suppose he didn’t give much of a reason, just “because I said so”…

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
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    #467861

    they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs..

    Okay..why the heck not? Leveling legs seem to be the solution here.

    I suppose he didn’t give much of a reason, just “because I said so”…

    The whole point of leveling feet is so you have a safe way of making the scaffold level without putting a random pile of scrap wood beneath it… I guess leveling out the whole ground would be even better, but leveling feet is still a safe way to do it without landscaping around the entire worksite.

    #467872
    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    Last summer we got the run around from the GC about fall protection when sheathing a floor. It was a large area, about 11,000 sq ft, 3rd floor deck. We had taken the time to go around the whole building in the man lift to install railings around the perimeter. But that wasn’t good enough. The GC felt that between the joists was a fall hazard, so we had to sheath the whole thing wearing harnesses and retractable cables. Even if we didn’t walk on the joists, but stayed back on the plywood, we had to have the harness on. The guys who weren’t installing, but only cutting or moving material, didn’t have to wear it, but there had to be caution tape at least 10ft back from the edge of the plywood and they couldn’t cross the tape. Again, this wasn’t the edge of the building, but the edge over the joists, on a flat surface.

    When we did the 4th floor deck, we didn’t wast our time and material buildings railings since we had the harness on anyway.

    #467889
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    Generally if we are setting up properly and working properly the MOL won’t visit us. Last year I changed sites because our masonry work was mostly complete but the sub crew was still working on balconies. I heard they got a visit from the MOL, and it’s a good thing. I sort of wish in our field (suspended access work) that the MOL would do more checks. I have no problem showing my rigging and setup. When I do the roof check for all the suspended access equipment, hoists etc I always check each piece of equipment fully! Most guys go up and walk around the roof acting like they are actually checking but really don’t even look at 40% of the equipment. They generally are going to the roof to plug in the main power. A good example is when you have 12 stages on a building a supervisor should not be completing the roof check in 10 min. I’ve heard that you need to trust the supervisor but for me in my dangerous type of work trust is earned not given. I don’t care who you are. If I’m riding a stage and I have no clue who you are, I need to check it myself each day.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #467931
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Last summer we got the run around from the GC about fall protection when sheathing a floor. It was a large area, about 11,000 sq ft, 3rd floor deck. We had taken the time to go around the whole building in the man lift to install railings around the perimeter. But that wasn’t good enough. The GC felt that between the joists was a fall hazard, so we had to sheath the whole thing wearing harnesses and retractable cables. Even if we didn’t walk on the joists, but stayed back on the plywood, we had to have the harness on. The guys who weren’t installing, but only cutting or moving material, didn’t have to wear it, but there had to be caution tape at least 10ft back from the edge of the plywood and they couldn’t cross the tape. Again, this wasn’t the edge of the building, but the edge over the joists, on a flat surface.

    When we did the 4th floor deck, we didn’t wast our time and material buildings railings since we had the harness on anyway.

    I would say he is right. You can go to your local OSHA office and get the CFR1926 book that will out line everything.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #467961
    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    Last summer we got the run around from the GC about fall protection when sheathing a floor. It was a large area, about 11,000 sq ft, 3rd floor deck. We had taken the time to go around the whole building in the man lift to install railings around the perimeter. But that wasn’t good enough. The GC felt that between the joists was a fall hazard, so we had to sheath the whole thing wearing harnesses and retractable cables. Even if we didn’t walk on the joists, but stayed back on the plywood, we had to have the harness on. The guys who weren’t installing, but only cutting or moving material, didn’t have to wear it, but there had to be caution tape at least 10ft back from the edge of the plywood and they couldn’t cross the tape. Again, this wasn’t the edge of the building, but the edge over the joists, on a flat surface.

    When we did the 4th floor deck, we didn’t wast our time and material buildings railings since we had the harness on anyway.

    I would say he is right. You can go to your local OSHA office and get the CFR1926 book that will out line everything.

    True, I wasn’t saying that the GC was technically wrong. That wasn’t my point, I suppose I didn’t make that clear. My beef is why did the GC have us install railings on the perimeter when we still had to wear harnesses on the deck? The guys installing could have just worn the retractors (like we did), and the cut/supply guys could have worn harnesses with ropes short enough to keep them back from all edges.

    #467970
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Last summer we got the run around from the GC about fall protection when sheathing a floor. It was a large area, about 11,000 sq ft, 3rd floor deck. We had taken the time to go around the whole building in the man lift to install railings around the perimeter. But that wasn’t good enough. The GC felt that between the joists was a fall hazard, so we had to sheath the whole thing wearing harnesses and retractable cables. Even if we didn’t walk on the joists, but stayed back on the plywood, we had to have the harness on. The guys who weren’t installing, but only cutting or moving material, didn’t have to wear it, but there had to be caution tape at least 10ft back from the edge of the plywood and they couldn’t cross the tape. Again, this wasn’t the edge of the building, but the edge over the joists, on a flat surface.

    When we did the 4th floor deck, we didn’t wast our time and material buildings railings since we had the harness on anyway.

    I would say he is right. You can go to your local OSHA office and get the CFR1926 book that will out line everything.

    True, I wasn’t saying that the GC was technically wrong. That wasn’t my point, I suppose I didn’t make that clear. My beef is why did the GC have us install railings on the perimeter when we still had to wear harnesses on the deck? The guys installing could have just worn the retractors (like we did), and the cut/supply guys could have worn harnesses with ropes short enough to keep them back from all edges.

    Ha must have realized his mistake after the fact. It happens all the time. The only real way to do it right is with the safety pole system.
    http://safetypole.com/residential/

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #468149
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    It seems like a belt and suspenders approach. With the “leading Edge” some sort of fall protection would be required for those installing the sheeting. The perimeter railings would not protect that edge. Once the floor sheeting was installed, then the harnesses would not be required for framing the walls with the perimeter railings. It is difficult to meet all of the fall protection requirements without doubling up a times.

    #468151
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Other then nailing my fingers together once in a while I run a pretty safe operation . I may be missing a few guards here and there too 🙂

    #468152

    All my years of construction haven’t had a site visit from OSHA . Most of the sites are not Union . As long as you practice common since on safety and follow the guidelines we all should be safe .

    Always willing to learn .

    #468472
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    locally ive only seen the saftey people twice working in residential.. once last spring and once 3 years ago working in the south end where all the richy rich folks live. they rarely make their presence known in residential unless someone calls and gives them a tip

    in commercial we had a in house saftey person who would make the rounds weekly

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #468509

    talk about practices you guys have on your sites, and freakish incidents with saftey officers whom have tried forcing things on you which are no where to be found within the saftey regulations

    last spring we were shut down for improper scaffold.. the safety guy tried stating that we didnt have the base of our staging correct.. it had to be on 2×10 planks which are perfectly level fist and the legs are fastened down to them… by levelling the planks he stated that we had to dig out under hte plank so its level and flat.. they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs.. not possible when nowhere in our contract with the home owner does it state we will be doing landscaping…. and theres 2 ft of grade drop off

    I’m certified in OSHA 10 OSHA 30 and scaffolding erection. leveling feet are 100% APPROVED. that inspector is a moron.

    #468529
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    talk about practices you guys have on your sites, and freakish incidents with saftey officers whom have tried forcing things on you which are no where to be found within the saftey regulations

    last spring we were shut down for improper scaffold.. the safety guy tried stating that we didnt have the base of our staging correct.. it had to be on 2×10 planks which are perfectly level fist and the legs are fastened down to them… by levelling the planks he stated that we had to dig out under hte plank so its level and flat.. they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs.. not possible when nowhere in our contract with the home owner does it state we will be doing landscaping…. and theres 2 ft of grade drop off

    I’m certified in OSHA 10 OSHA 30 and scaffolding erection. leveling feet are 100% APPROVED. that inspector is a moron.

    Jkirt is in Canada and things could be different up there??

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #468532
    crotalusco
    Pro
    west bend, wi

    Leveling legs are OSHA approved but are conditionally so. Height of scaffolding, amount of screw that must remain in leg etc.

    That is all a moot point as in almost all cases a site safety official is perfectly able to go above and beyond OSHA standards

    #468543

    yes a certain amount must remain inside, but scaffolding manufacturer’s regulations are typically stiffer than OSHA’s and they approve and manufacture said leveling feet.

    #468595
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    talk about practices you guys have on your sites, and freakish incidents with saftey officers whom have tried forcing things on you which are no where to be found within the saftey regulations

    last spring we were shut down for improper scaffold.. the safety guy tried stating that we didnt have the base of our staging correct.. it had to be on 2×10 planks which are perfectly level fist and the legs are fastened down to them… by levelling the planks he stated that we had to dig out under hte plank so its level and flat.. they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs.. not possible when nowhere in our contract with the home owner does it state we will be doing landscaping…. and theres 2 ft of grade drop off

    I’m certified in OSHA 10 OSHA 30 and scaffolding erection. leveling feet are 100% APPROVED. that inspector is a moron.

    the inspector is indeed a idiot.. he makes up his own rules which do not exist anywhere. hes former canadian navy, he went into being a saftey officer for large commercial outfits acting as a saftey officer.. he was fired by all 4 for costing the company money do to utter nonsense.. one such case was because he went into a multi million dollar project on a weekend and walked around checking extension chords.. any chord with a nick or electrical tape on it he cut up .. he did this to well over $3000 worth of extension chords stating their unsafe

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #468625
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    cords seem to be a never ending issue. It seems like thye are always in need of replacement. Whenever I find a good sale on them I buy a bunch so we always have good cords. I never seem to have enough time to fix them all.

    #468635
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    talk about practices you guys have on your sites, and freakish incidents with saftey officers whom have tried forcing things on you which are no where to be found within the saftey regulations

    last spring we were shut down for improper scaffold.. the safety guy tried stating that we didnt have the base of our staging correct.. it had to be on 2×10 planks which are perfectly level fist and the legs are fastened down to them… by levelling the planks he stated that we had to dig out under hte plank so its level and flat.. they cant be blocked up and we cant use levelling legs.. not possible when nowhere in our contract with the home owner does it state we will be doing landscaping…. and theres 2 ft of grade drop off

    I’m certified in OSHA 10 OSHA 30 and scaffolding erection. leveling feet are 100% APPROVED. that inspector is a moron.

    the inspector is indeed a idiot.. he makes up his own rules which do not exist anywhere. hes former canadian navy, he went into being a saftey officer for large commercial outfits acting as a saftey officer.. he was fired by all 4 for costing the company money do to utter nonsense.. one such case was because he went into a multi million dollar project on a weekend and walked around checking extension chords.. any chord with a nick or electrical tape on it he cut up .. he did this to well over $3000 worth of extension chords stating their unsafe

    So they were not unsafe? Don’t you guys get fined for stuff like that? We do.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 36 total)
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