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Safe use of a Tablesaw

Viewing 18 posts - 61 through 78 (of 78 total)
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  • #69509

    Yikes… all of this talk about losing fingers and limbs and eyesight (and elsewhere – lung issues)… Sure has me wanting to buy top notch safety stuff and really not get lazy…

    John S

    #69524
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I wonder if it would be possible to make a safety glove that would work for table saw use like the same principle that chain saw chaps use. I don’t have a clue if this would work but hey its an idea.

    #69559

    If a glove could shrug off the damage carbide teeth would cause (keep in mind what a saw blade can cut through) how much dexterity could that glove have?

    #69567

    I figured wearing chainmail armor might actually be my best bet of lasting the next 50+ years in my shop unscathed… What do you guys think? I can see it now… my new blog: the Renaissance Woodworker. Though I am sure it already exists :\ Maybe, the Knight who says Ni (anyone know the movie?)

    John S

    #69583
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Lon, you are totally right if science keeps making crazy leaps forward there could be a new material out there that could potentially handle it. I am not holding my breath though.

    John, I would watch/read that blog for sure!

    #69669
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I figured wearing chainmail armor might actually be my best bet of lasting the next 50+ years in my shop unscathed… What do you guys think? I can see it now… my new blog: the Renaissance Woodworker. Though I am sure it already exists :\ Maybe, the Knight who says Ni (anyone know the movie?)

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail???

    #102055

    I got this in a recent email and thought it summed it up nicely:
    http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/blasts2014/19tablesaw.html

    NINETEEN WAYS to help avoid injuring your fingers on a tablesaw
    19. Use a bandsaw for ripping instead of a tablesaw
    18. Use a tracksaw for ripping instead of a tablesaw
    17. Use an automatic stock feeder whenever you rip on your tablesaw
    16. Use a good push stick
    15. Use a good featherboard
    14. Use a Micro Jig GRR-Ripper
    13. Never grasp the workpiece at a point beyond the blade
    12. Stand clear of the path of a possible kickback
    11. Avoid long sleeves, long hair or loose clothing near tools with rotating spindles
    10. Use a blade splitter on your tablesaw
    9. Use the saw’s blade guard
    8. Never use any power tool while under the influence of alcohol or any kind of drug
    7. Avoid clutter around the tablesaw that might cause you to lose your balance
    6. Eliminate all distractions
    5. Concentrate only on the task at hand
    4. Don’t be in a rush
    3. Don’t work while tired
    2. Be extremely careful at all times while in the workshop
    1. In case all these precautions have failed, make the blade STOP AND DISAPPEAR the instant your skin touches it*

    *Owning a SawStop will make this possible.

    Aside from #1 being an advertisement… it is helpful/intuitive

    John S

    #102359
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It is amazing how many people use the table saw every day with out issue.

    #102386
    Calidecks64
    Pro
    Anaheim Hills, Cali

    When I was in HS we had a guy turn around and set his hand on the saw blade. Took off his thumb and part of his hand. Damn that was messy! He was playing around in the shop class.

    #102463

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail???

    Ah yes, sorry Boyd – dead on!!! It is a classic indeed 🙂

    It is amazing how many people use the table saw every day with out issue.

    This is absolutely true as well. Much of the 19 on the list is common sense.

    John S

    #102676
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    This is absolutely true as well. Much of the 19 on the list is common sense.

    I think a persons brain is the best safety tool on the job. You just have to use it!

    #102713
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    I think a persons brain is the best safety tool on the job. You just have to use it!

    I couldn’t agree more, the problem is most don’t use them.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #102745

    The reality is that using power tools is inherently dangerous. I accept that danger every time I am in the shop. Sometimes accidents happen. We are all human and things can go wrong. The key is to minimize risk and try to work as safely as possible. I think the list John provided is pretty good. One thing that is not on the list that I thought I would mention is to think about the cutting you have to do and plan to minimize the number of cuts you need to make. Every time you have to move push something through a blade (and it does not matter what saw it is — bandsaws can tracks saws and any other saw can cut fingers just as easily as a table saw) there is risk.

    Orange County, CA

    #102761
    svensshutters
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    I would be worried about a glove being caught and pulled down into the table. You hand is going no where quick then, except down. What is wrong with push blocks, sticks, and cross cut sleds? Just don’t short cut it and what Dirty said is the best advice. If you can’t think a project through to completion, just don’t do it.

    #102964
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Gloves can be bad on a lot of power tools, Like grinders, The rule there is don’t use them

    #102968
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    Gloves can be bad on a lot of power tools, Like grinders, The rule there is don’t use them

    If it spins, I won’t wear gloves, so I find that I rarely end up wearing them. A glove is going to prevent a scrape or a splinter, those are things I can live with. The only time I might wear some is if I had a ton of material to move, demo to do with a rotary hammer for a long time, or had to work with something very hot or cold.

    #103023

    Good advice…gloves are a big no-no in the shop. Too easy to have it crap and pull you into a cutter.

    Orange County, CA

    #103038
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I agree with ya both except I do use gloves with my 4 1/2″ angle grinder, Especially when I do a no no and chuck up a 7″ wheel. They have saved me a few times with what would have just been a minor scrape but I don’t feel like the wheels would grab the gloves like a blade with teeth would

    EDIT: I see in my previous post I said grinders. I need to correct that as meaning bench grinders. Not angle grinders 🙂

Viewing 18 posts - 61 through 78 (of 78 total)
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