dcsimg

Rot resistant wood for siding

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 38 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #507979
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    The client for a prospective siding job (and architect) is inquiring about more rot resistant siding options. She needs about 40 liner feet of 1×6 V Groove siding replaced. Currently, it is Douglas fir…I can get more Douglas fir or yellow pine readily. Anything else, I’m assuming I’ll have to make myself as I haven’t stumbled upon it yet.

    The area in question gets little sunlight and has some pretty bad rot currently. While the rest of the home is more or less fine, this side could probably benefit from a different species.

    How does cedar hold up when painted? Has anyone used cypress for siding?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #508001
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Cedar T&G is pretty much all we have out here.

    The big problem with siding in wet areas, is the fact that it is painted on one side, and in contact with something like Tyvek or tar-paper on the other. This makes it very difficult for it to ever dry completely.

    One of the best options, though a pricey one, is called “Rain Screen Siding”. Basically, you install the WRB, then nail down furring strips on the studs, then siding goes over this. It is screened top and bottom to keep out insects, but unblocked, so air can flow from top to bottom.

    The furring strips need not be PT, either.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #508046
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Are they open to non wood options, you can get a true bevel boral siding, if they are painting you can’t tell it apart from wood and it will never rot.

    #508092
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    The big problem with siding in wet areas, is the fact that it is painted on one side, and in contact with something like Tyvek or tar-paper on the other. This makes it very difficult for it to ever dry completely.

    Given that we are stuck matching the existing siding, I’d have to plane the new siding to a smaller depth in order to fit the furring strips! If this is the only option, I’m game for it though.

    Are they open to non wood options, you can get a true bevel boral siding, if they are painting you can’t tell it apart from wood and it will never rot.

    Non wood options…doubt it. This is a historical home and the owner is insistent on keeping things original. That means bevel siding is out too… Has to be v groove T&G, installed vertically.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #508096
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    hardie board over a rainscreen is pretty unbeatable. cedar should be fine too as long as you use a good primer.

    Install it over this, and you wont have to fur it out, and still have rainscreen performance. http://www.benjaminobdyke.com/products/hydrogap-drainable-housewrap

    #508099
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Oh i didnt read that part about v groove but you can get v groove 1×6 boral. Personally imho boral is a great prodduct and it seems like wood these days is getting worse and worse. A non wooden product is the way to go for it to stand up to the elements for years to come. As far as historical goes if its painted it will look the same as wood. Heck a few years ago we did the oldest brick house in covington ky, the carneal house, and we replaced the wooden corbals with azek and the historical society was ok with it.

    #508162
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    hardie board over a rainscreen is pretty unbeatable. cedar should be fine too as long as you use a good primer.

    Install it over this, and you wont have to fur it out, and still have rainscreen performance. http://www.benjaminobdyke.com/products/hydrogap-drainable-housewrap

    I think I may be regretting this client already…and no work has started. She had a “lengthy” conversation with a guy from the USDA Forest Products Lab (???) who told her about the cedar breather product. And then I got a lesson on how to install siding from her 🙂

    I’m certainly younger than the typical contractor in my area, but I’m no idiot…

    Can I triple my estimate to account for the PITA factor?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #508168

    hardie board over a rainscreen is pretty unbeatable. cedar should be fine too as long as you use a good primer.

    Install it over this, and you wont have to fur it out, and still have rainscreen performance. http://www.benjaminobdyke.com/products/hydrogap-drainable-housewrap

    I think I may be regretting this client already…and no work has started. She had a “lengthy” conversation with a guy from the USDA Forest Products Lab (???) who told her about the cedar breather product. And then I got a lesson on how to install siding from her :)

    I’m certainly younger than the typical contractor in my area, but I’m no idiot…

    Can I triple my estimate to account for the PITA factor?

    Triple your time estimate, and your margin on materials. Life is too short to waste on annoyances unless work is scarce

    #508173
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    USDA Forest Products Lab is an amazing resource, but I’d be willing to bet that 98% of the info they have is above the head of the average HO.

    Cedar breather is a fine product, I guess. I’ve never personally used it. It’s a dimpled underlayment, originally designed for roof decks. It’s an attempt at a rolled rain-screen product.

    Sometimes, “historical” buildings were constructed far from correctly, and you have basically 2 options: Do it wrong again, to preserve it as a historical failure, or do it right, and then it’s not an accurate historical building anymore.

    As a member over on CT is fond of saying, “Some jobs just aren’t worth doing”.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #508175
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    USDA Forest Products Lab is an amazing resource, but I’d be willing to bet that 98% of the info they have is above the head of the average HO.

    He seems to think Sherwin Williams A100 is a primer…a gallon bucket about 20 feet away says Exterior Paint..but hey, what do I know 🙂 unless they’ve changed things up since I bought that paint probably 5 years ago, it’s still not a primer.

    Triple your time estimate, and your margin on materials. Life is too short to waste on annoyances unless work is scarce

    I’m thinking about it!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #508176
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Yeah one of the cabinet shops just did the same thing with their estimate for one of our jobs because the home owner kept changing things and was being a pain in the butt, they are going to make out pretty good they just have to put up with them for a couple months

    #508219
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We use a mildacide in the paint in wet areas out here.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #508257
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    hardie board over a rainscreen is pretty unbeatable. cedar should be fine too as long as you use a good primer.

    Install it over this, and you wont have to fur it out, and still have rainscreen performance. http://www.benjaminobdyke.com/products/hydrogap-drainable-housewrap

    I think I may be regretting this client already…and no work has started. She had a “lengthy” conversation with a guy from the USDA Forest Products Lab (???) who told her about the cedar breather product. And then I got a lesson on how to install siding from her :)

    I’m certainly younger than the typical contractor in my area, but I’m no idiot…

    Can I triple my estimate to account for the PITA factor?

    Triple your time estimate, and your margin on materials. Life is too short to waste on annoyances unless work is scarce

    Sounds like she knows just enough to be dangerous. Those type of clients are the worst.

    #508279
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    hardie board over a rainscreen is pretty unbeatable. cedar should be fine too as long as you use a good primer.

    Install it over this, and you wont have to fur it out, and still have rainscreen performance. http://www.benjaminobdyke.com/products/hydrogap-drainable-housewrap

    I think I may be regretting this client already…and no work has started. She had a “lengthy” conversation with a guy from the USDA Forest Products Lab (???) who told her about the cedar breather product. And then I got a lesson on how to install siding from her :)

    I’m certainly younger than the typical contractor in my area, but I’m no idiot…

    Can I triple my estimate to account for the PITA factor?

    I avoid them kind of people no matter what .It just isn’t worth the headaches 🙂

    #508286
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Since you are doing restoration work, the price goes up. This is not a typical home repair so price accordingly to account for your time.

    I would search for some restoration carpenters and ask them what they recommend. You will find this kind of work to be challenging and you can easily lose your shirt doing it which is why so few do.
    If your customer is looking for the lowest estimate walk away. Restoration work is top dollar and is billed by the hour. Give her a dollar per hour estimate with a general idea of the hours involved but by no means a hard estimate of the time.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #508307

    The client for a prospective siding job (and architect) is inquiring about more rot resistant siding options. She needs about 40 liner feet of 1×6 V Groove siding replaced. Currently, it is Douglas fir…I can get more Douglas fir or yellow pine readily. Anything else, I’m assuming I’ll have to make myself as I haven’t stumbled upon it yet.

    The area in question gets little sunlight and has some pretty bad rot currently. While the rest of the home is more or less fine, this side could probably benefit from a different species.

    How does cedar hold up when painted? Has anyone used cypress for siding?

    On a related note, one of my projects this summer is to build an auxiliary shed for my side yard, just a 3×6 or so outdoor closet/cabinet. I was planning basic 2×4 frame construction with T&G cedar for the sides. Would you suggest putting in a sheathing (osb or exterior ply) and/or a wrap, or just make sure ventilation is decent enough? To avoid needing a permit, it will be on elephant feet, making it “moveable “

    #508327
    Clev08
    Pro

    hardie board over a rainscreen is pretty unbeatable. cedar should be fine too as long as you use a good primer.

    Install it over this, and you wont have to fur it out, and still have rainscreen performance. http://www.benjaminobdyke.com/products/hydrogap-drainable-housewrap

    I think I may be regretting this client already…and no work has started. She had a “lengthy” conversation with a guy from the USDA Forest Products Lab (???) who told her about the cedar breather product. And then I got a lesson on how to install siding from her :)

    I’m certainly younger than the typical contractor in my area, but I’m no idiot…

    Can I triple my estimate to account for the PITA factor?

    If she knows everything why doesn’t she just do it herself? I do wish we could add an additional PITA charge on jobs.

    #508339
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Another issue is that we quoted a pine replacement… Now she’s asking for a different species, wants “cedar breather”, and the wood to be primed on all sides with a specific primer (not my preference!)

    The new estimate is going to be much higher I think.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #508350

    USDA Forest Products Lab is an amazing resource, but I’d be willing to bet that 98% of the info they have is above the head of the average HO.

    He seems to think Sherwin Williams A100 is a primer…a gallon bucket about 20 feet away says Exterior Paint..but hey, what do I know :) unless they’ve changed things up since I bought that paint probably 5 years ago, it’s still not a primer.

    Triple your time estimate, and your margin on materials. Life is too short to waste on annoyances unless work is scarce

    I’m thinking about it!

    I have done a couple of jobs like that for a few clients, live and learn, just will never work for a client like that again, I worked more and made no profit from those clients, I realize that I don’t need that type of clients to work for, good luck with what you decide on,

    #508353

    Another issue is that we quoted a pine replacement… Now she’s asking for a different species, wants “cedar breather”, and the wood to be primed on all sides with a specific primer (not my preference!)

    The new estimate is going to be much higher I think.

    The new estimate may be your gracious exit, if you want it to be after you put in the padding necessary for the PITA factor, that or enough profit to soothe your end of day headache 🙂

    Will

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 38 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.484 seconds