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retrofit lally column

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  TopNotch 6 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #618183

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    So I dont think many here have any experience with these but I will throw it out anyway.

    I will be transferring a point load onto a beam and pushing the archy to do flinch plates instead of adding a lally.

    They suck. The last one I did, I poured in one shot. I cut out then suspended the column in place with 2×6’s carriage bolted around the column to keep it elevated. Its a bitch then their a shrinkage factor.

    I have also cut them a bit short and shimmed with steel plates, or cut it to size and lift the beam via jacking but thats not going to work often.

    So I am thinking of trying these out: http://www.deancolumn.com/video.html

    Any experience?

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #618190

    Clev08
    Pro

    I have always shimmed them with steel plates, I have never heard of the dean columns before but they look like they would be much faster. To me it would depend on how much extra they cost.

    #618212

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I have used something similar in new construction on a big exterior porch. Was nice to be able to make adjustments.

    #618229

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    I don’t have any experience with those, but they sure do look like they would make the job alot quicker and easier.

    I don’t see any reason the architect / engineer wouldn’t go for it.

    #618252

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I have used something similar in new construction on a big exterior porch. Was nice to be able to make adjustments.

    Warren, how was it installed? Two concrete phases? Footing below slab height, position post then lock in and level the surface.

    I feel like there will be some curing shrinkage from under that plate.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #618259

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I have used something similar in new construction on a big exterior porch. Was nice to be able to make adjustments.

    Warren, how was it installed? Two concrete phases? Footing below slab height, position post then lock in and level the surface.

    I feel like there will be some curing shrinkage from under that plate.

    Usually, we would set them on the block porch foundation. Eventually, the porch would get filled and poured. I don’t think your gonna get much shrinkage with just 4 inches of concrete poured. I don’t think we used the same lally posts though. Ours were just steel plates with the threaded studs welded to them and a finish wooden post on the plate. This allowed us to set the finish post there without pouring the concrete against it.

    Not sure exactly the reason you are using this vs a regular adjustable column. They do make them in larger bearing varieties that will bear quite a bit of load.

    #618261

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    Why not just shore up, do the footing, and then install the post? Is it the second pour that you are trying to avoid?

    #618262

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Ours were just steel plates with the threaded studs welded to them and a finish wooden post on the plate. This allowed us to set the finish post there without pouring the concrete against it.

    Not sure exactly the reason you are using this vs a regular adjustable column. They do make them in larger bearing varieties that will bear quite a bit of load.

    Which adjustable column? they are illegal in many places. I guess the column you use the adjustment plate is on the top not buried since you have a wood attachment point.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #618265

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Why not just shore up, do the footing, and then install the post? Is it the second pour that you are trying to avoid?

    Its a little tough cutting the lally to a snug size and wiggling it under without shimming.

    The arch I am dealing with is a buddy, hes a good guy but over does stuff. He needs to work a few weeks in the field to see the value in alternative solutions. The last time he called out a column he called out a large steel boot that wraps around the beam. Even on this one he has a 2×2 pad. Its a supplement column to counter beam deflection, what is existing is already good enough.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

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