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Reclaimed wood

This topic contains 68 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by  DirtyWhiteBoy 4 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 69 total)
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  • #53722

    Anonymous

    I know all about RR ties, I avoided stepping on them for 33 years LOL. These guys are right. Do not use them. They’d be hard to cut anyway, and stinky forever. I made a parking pad beside my house framing it with ties and filled it in with roadbase. Tamped it down tight and it’s worked fine for 19 years but in the heat of the summer you do not want to step on one, Even after all this time the creosote still seeps out. I wish I would have used something else but they were free.

    #53758

    Dunk
    Pro

    I love using reclaimed barn wood for picture frames for my scroll saw art. I even make some projects out of the barn wood as well.

    Attachments:

    As You Slide Down the Banister of Life, Pray That All The Splinters Are Pointed The Other Way...
    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."

    #53859

    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    I have used RR ties for retaining walls and flower beds. They work great. The look so so. They stink. They are gooey and sticky. Creosote will ooze out and get on you no ifs ands or buts. They will eat saw blades, circular and chain. You can not even cut them during the heat of summer they are so gooey. Yes look up it gooey is an official descriptive term for wood sanctioned by the international brotherhood and order of wood describers.

    #89084

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Some great work on this thread!

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #89623

    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    I am working on a few projects with reclaimed wood right now, it makes for a good looking project, but a lot of work. If I had to pay for reclaimed wood, I don’t know that I would use it for projects.

    #186839

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    I salvaged some hardwood flooring from the reno job we are on right now.
    It’ll never be good for flooring but I was thinking of ripping it down to 2 3/4″ or 3″ (if I can) to use for face frame material for my Christmas projects.
    It’s going to be fairly labor intensive (from the perspective of buying new vs reworking what I have), and I was wondering what the best way to get the finish off of the face might be?
    I was thinking of taking my RO sander with 80 or 100 grit to it to remove the clear coat and stain to get to bare wood…any thoughts?
    Pretty sure I’ll end up burning through quite a few hours and quite a few disks.
    https://www.dropbox.com/sc/49l5v9ca0156s71/AAAW-TzSR-cBCZcMfTlZ7DQ7a

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #186867

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I was wondering what the best way to get the finish off of the face might be?

    Do you have a bench top planer you could run them through? A good planer will remove a world of sins.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #186878

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    Nope, no benchtop planer, and I’d be concerned about gumming up the blade horribly. But that would be fairly quick and I could just knock down the ridges with a sander after.
    Maybe I can sacrifice some blades on my Stanley power plane for this purpose…might be nice to take a pass or two to remove the finish and buy some new blades, as opposed to sanding for a few hours.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #186885

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Nope, no benchtop planer, and I’d be concerned about gumming up the blade horribly. But that would be fairly quick and I could just knock down the ridges with a sander after.
    Maybe I can sacrifice some blades on my Stanley power plane for this purpose…might be nice to take a pass or two to remove the finish and buy some new blades, as opposed to sanding for a few hours.

    I don’t have a bench top planer either. It would be nice tho because you could get the same thickness on all your lumber that way.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #186887

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    Good point….
    I guess if I can get the face finish stripped somehow I can always try to get access to my old employers shop and plane the backside of the wood, and they have a belt sander there as well.
    May be time to make a couple phone calls…

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #186888

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I was wondering what the best way to get the finish off of the face might be?

    Do you have a bench top planer you could run them through? A good planer will remove a world of sins.

    That’s what I was thinking too, plus both faces would be parallel.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #186987

    guess if I can get the face finish stripped somehow I can always try to get access to my old employers shop and plane the backside of the wood, and they have a belt sander there as well.
    May be time to make a couple phone calls…

    Unless the finish is gummy, I would think the planer will just cut if off. If you use sand paper, I would bet that the paper will gum up rather quickly.

    #186998

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    It’s prefinished hardwood, that’s why I was concerned about ruining planer blades.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #187009

    I was saying I thought the planer would handle it. Try scrapping a knife blade on some flooring and see if the finish flakes off or if it sticks to the knife blade. I think the sandpaper would make finer dust and the heat from sanding would gum things up. The planer knife would just slice through a hard finish and not have as much heat to gum things up. I think you would want dust collection to help out also. Just my guess.

    #187023

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    It’s prefinished hardwood, that’s why I was concerned about ruining planer blades.

    I keep an old set of blades around for removing finish on pieces. it does take the edge off of a good set quickly so I will make the first pass with the old blades then switch to better blades for additional passes. it really saves on blades. I will also do the same if a piece is real dusty or dirty.

    #187530

    We made a couple of these tables using old oak planks. Also the original floor was re-finished and made to look rustic. That’s the finished floor in the pic.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #187674

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We made a couple of these tables using old oak planks. Also the original floor was re-finished and made to look rustic. That’s the finished floor in the pic.

    That came out really nice. Bravo!

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #187723

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    We made a couple of these tables using old oak planks. Also the original floor was re-finished and made to look rustic. That’s the finished floor in the pic.

    Those are some very nice tables. Great work.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #187818

    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I am hoping to get started tonight on a reclaimed wood project. I am taking a massive timber from our job site and I am going to attempt to hollow it out and build a chandelier out of it.

    I am thinking of using a combination of a router w/ straight pattern bit, chainsaw, auger bits and hole saw. We will see what happens…

    #187885

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I am hoping to get started tonight on a reclaimed wood project. I am taking a massive timber from our job site and I am going to attempt to hollow it out and build a chandelier out of it.

    I am thinking of using a combination of a router w/ straight pattern bit, chainsaw, auger bits and hole saw. We will see what happens…

    Now that sounds interesting a wooden chandelier out of a reclaimed timber. I have never seen a wooden chandelier. What kind of wood?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

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