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QUIETEST Portable Air Compressor in 2018

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  • #675506
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We are using a caiforina air and it’s very quite.

    Altho the California Air double weenier is quite it is rather gutless compared to the double weenier Dewalt.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #675536
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Altho the California Air double weenier is quite it is rather gutless compared to the double weenier Dewal

    I believe that is one of the trade offs for being so quiet. Lots of power or quiet hard to have both.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #675619
    CB
    Pro

    Best thing about them is they only draw 8 amps of power!

    https://www.aircompressorsdirect.com/Eagle-EA-5000-Air-Compressor/p70903.html

    https://www.aircompressorsdirect.com/Eagle-EA-6000-Air-Compressor/p70904.html

    8 amps? Is it possible that is a misprint? I am questioning because the 20 gallon version of this Eagle compressor with the same 6 cfm pump rating, and the same 2.5 peak HP rating, the amp draw spec says 14 amps.

    I dont think its a misprint, i can only fine them listed with 8 amp moters.

    Eagle Silent Series

    EA-6500 14amp 53dBA 6cfm 125psi 50%dc 20gal 2.5hp
    EA-6000 08amp 53dBa 6cfm 125psi 50%dc 06gal 2.5hp

    Here are two Eagle Silent Series compressor, with the exact same cfm rating, the exact same psi rating, the exact same duty cycle, the exact same decibel level, the exact same horsepower… The only difference is tank size.

    How does a smaller tank cause a difference between 8 amps versus 14 amps?

    On all the compressors I have ever had, the current that the motors drew did not care if the tank was almost empty, completely empty, partially full, or entirely full. When the motor kicked on, the electrical current would flow, and overloaded circuits would trip… tank size be damned. That’s why I was thinking there must be a misprint here? Either the 8 amp rating or the 14 amp rating might be in error?

    Other than in the Top Secret inventory of a military super power, has man yet invented an affordable machine that can generate 6 cfm @ 90 psi with a rating of 2.5 hp on only 8 amps of power at 115 volts? I have not found any other compressor that boasts of this efficiency. If the 8 amp claim of Eagle is true, then the EA-6000 would certainly rise to the top of the list.

    But then that begs the obvious question, why couldn’t Eagle make the EA-6500, which has all the same specs but for the tank size, just as efficient?

    The 8 amp moter will over heat trying to pump up a 20 gallon tank, so needs a bigger moter, but is fine for 6 gallon tank. Or maybe you are right the amp ratings are off.

    If the 20 gallon motor was more powerful, wouldn’t there be a corresponding difference in power indication, such as horsepower? Or cfm? But the horsepower (2.5 hp) and the cfm ratings at 90 psi (6 cfm) are the same between both models. As is the duty cycle, at 50%.

    Since duty cycle is measured in units of time, and both motors have the same duty cycle and same pump flow capacity per minute (another unit of time)… I’m not able to understand how gallon size of the tank being filled makes a difference.

    The only thing I can think of is the possibility that Eagle is citing peak horsepower in one spec, and running horsepower in the other spec. But why would Eagle not be consistent in their specs, other than to purposely mislead potential buyers? And if misleading buyers was the goal, why not cite peak horsepower for the motor that draws more amps?

    And, that still doesn’t explain why the compressor with the 14 amp draw still only has the same cfm rating as the compressor with the 8 amp draw. Something is amiss. And everytime I think about it, it is after work, and of course, the company is closed. I’ll have to write them an email with all these questions I suppose.

    BE the change you want to see.
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    #675648
    monman1
    Pro

    I think emailing them is best, but post what you find out.

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #675784
    CB
    Pro

    I never got around to writing that email.

    I was working inside an office, and busted two of the light covers to the suspended T rail ceiling. You know, the 4’x2′ covers to 4 tube, 4 foot office fixtures that recess flat with acoustic ceiling tiles. I really detest the Big Orange store, but they were the quickest and closest place still open after business hours to get replacements to those old brittle pieces of plastic. I’m normally not the type to break things, so immediate repair eclipsed waiting for a lighting job shop to open.

    And there it was.

    A Makita MAC5200 brand new in the original box, on a cart, right across the aisle from the cashier, with a yellow discount tag on it. I peeked in the box, since it was open. I looked at the manual, and looked at the compressor, still wrapped in plastic. Everything was there. 6.5 CFM @ 90 PSI. 3 HP. Cast iron cylinder. Makita’s so called “Big Bore” piston. The bigger brother to the MAC2400. In fact the biggest compressor Makita sells.

    5.2 gallon single horizontal tank with lever handle ball valve for quick quarter turn tank draining. Steel wheels with run flat semi pneumatic tires. Fold down/up handle with built in air hose caddy. Three meaty handle grips for grappling in several positions around the roll cage protecting the motor, pump, and tank. Big easy to read dial face gauges arranged on a dashboard that included a regulator dial and two brass female quick couplers.

    The earlier recommendations of Makita that other respondents made earlier up thread wafted into mind as I stood there weighing whether I want it quiet, or want it now. Furiously reading the manual, which thankfully was in English… all English in fact… made me feel as if I finally belonged, because I can work all day and not hear a single word of English spoken at the job or at the yard… I found that the cut in pressure was 110 psi, and the cut out was 140 psi.

    That’s when it hit me. The last portable compressor standing in my fleet has a non adjustable cut in pressure of 80 psi. You can easily see why that sucks when you’re on a ladder with a 100 ft of hose and 15 feet of elevation and 2 more minutes of time between firing the next nail fully, or waiting for the faulty valve to leak down enough to cycle the compressor back on again to build pressure up over 90, or just hand hammering a bunch of stick outs. Oh yeah, THAT’s really why I needed a new compressor, like yesterday. Never mind the quiet, I need the function.

    But if I’m going to buy a new compressor anyway, why not get the quietest? Well, because this $349 MAC5200 had a yellow tag on it that said $175. That’s like finding a $174 dollar bill lying on the floor. I didn’t even have to look both ways before scooping it up. I simply rolled the entire cart over to the cashier, who scanned it, and sure enough, normal price $349, this price $175.

    I asked if I could bring it back if I find anything wrong with it. No problem, returns just the same as if the box were never opened.

    I spent all morning today trying to find something… ANYTHING… wrong with it. I read ALL of the reviews for this compressor on the Home Depot website, and checked for each and every complaint. I can’t find anything wrong. Not a single scratch on the incredibly durable paint. No bent wheels. Nothing broken. No leaks. Holds pressure overnight.

    I’m a sucker for a good deal. This thing was made in Taiwan, and the quality difference between tools made in Taiwan versus China is readily apparent in every detail. Hopefully, this thread will carry on by a new torch bearer, looking for the holy grail of quietest compressor. In the meantime, me and my noisy MAC5200 are getting ready to rumble.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #675802
    monman1
    Pro

    I have that compressor too. I can use a blow gun non stop and it will not drop below i think it was 80psi. You sure got a good deal!

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #675804
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    @CB, great choice going with the Makita! Just an FYI, its rather simple to adjust the cut in/out pressures on them…just a couple of screws!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #675852
    CB
    Pro

    It is easy on the Makita, yes. Just like it was on my old Speed Air, or is on my Ingersoll Rand, or on any of my former compressors that had a traditional Furnas style pressure switch.

    But there are no screws to turn on a Harbor Freight pancake. The entire pressure switch and valve are epoxied together. All the parts are miniaturized and woefully cheapened. I had one HF compressor that I had to de commission because the tank was leaking straight out of the box. It was one of those parking lot sales that I got suckered into, bought the thing, shelved it, two years later needed it, and by then HF had changed designs yet again, and of course long out of warranty.

    So yes, with the Makita, there are two screws… one that adjusts cut out pressure only without effecting cut in, and the other that adjusts cut out and cut in together. And of course, the third screw that opens the pressure switch cover. I feel so much better getting back to name brand products. This Makita is but a shadow of the 1970’s era cast iron twin piston pumps with 20 gallon ASME code welded tanks and true 2 running HP motors… or the original blue Emglos and Ciasons of the 1980’s, but it is an all metal no plastic no bs tank compared to the HF and Husky crap it is replacing.

    Now where did I put my Peltor’s?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #675868
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    But if I’m going to buy a new compressor anyway, why not get the quietest? Well, because this $349 MAC5200 had a yellow tag on it that said $175. That’s like finding a $174 dollar bill lying on the floor

    Man what a great deal. Yes you can easily see the difference in quality especially side by side with tool that has been cheapened down. That was Craftsman’s downfall when they moved all their tool production to China. The tools looked the same but side by side you could see the differences, same price inferior made tool.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #675951
    CB
    Pro

    I can remember when Made in USA was really great. Then not so great, as cost cutting really took hold in the 1970s. The 70’s was also the transformative decade when memories of Pearl Harbor began to fade, and when previously dismissed “Jap Crap” (this term was so common back then it actually WAS politically correct) eventually became the most sought after and highest quality goods one could buy… as the names of Sony and Sieko and Honda and Toyota and Makita rose above all USA equivalents.

    Then goods started being made in Taiwan, which was a downgrade back at the time, but today is considered a substantial upgrade over equivalents goods produced in China. Of course the same will hold true in the future… when our children and children’s children will long for the days when “decent tools” (in the ever declining standard of what is deemed decent) were made in China, but ever since China cleaned up their industrial pollution and human rights violations, and production of consumer goods moved to (some other currently impoverished country yet to be identified), you just can’t get stuff made like it used to be. And their frame of reference will be the quality Chinese tools that we now deride as inferior to what we grew up with.

    Anyways…. it’s all about money it seems. Speaking of money, I forgot about the 10% sales tax. I actually saved $191 dollars. That was too hard to pass up, no matter how quiet I would have preferred a new compressor to be.

    I will say that the MAC5200 is quite a hunk of metal at almost 90 lbs. The two wheels and three carrying handles all get used in moving it from place to place.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #676075
    CB
    Pro

    Yowsa… $562 for the same compressor?!

    https://www.grainger.com/product/MAKITA-3-0-HP-22YJ54

    “For the ones who get it done” (and get “done” in the process)

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #676085
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I recently bought that compressor also. So far I have no complaints. I wish I would have gotten a clearance deal like you but even at the 369 or so, that I paid I feel it is a good compressor. The only issue I have had with it is a poor cold start. With temps in the teens Fahrenheit (-10 C), It does not start well but what compressors do. Unfortunately, In Minnesota, we end up working a fair bit in cold weather, which is hard on compressors, hoses and nail guns.

    I do believe it is still one of the quieter compressors of it’s class, and that most compressors with similar specs will be louder. If you want quieter, you will give up performance typically.

    Here is a link to a thread I had on my experiences with compressors and the selection. https://bethepro.com/forums/topic/what-is-your-compressor-recommendation/ I have had one Makita compressor previously and did not have to bad of luck with it.

    #676087
    CB
    Pro

    Kurt, thanks for your post. I’m going to read your thread, but real quick, let’s talk oil for that MAC5200 of yours, especially when it comes to cold starts. What oil are you using?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #676090
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Kurt, thanks for your post. I’m going to read your thread, but real quick, let’s talk oil for that MAC5200 of yours, especially when it comes to cold starts. What oil are you using?

    I am embarrassed to say, I am not really sure. I bought the Compressor in December at Acme tool In Minneapolis and they set everything up for me before they would even let it out the door. Installed the oil also. I guessed they would have a winter weight oil in it but am not sure. One thing I do really need to do is more research on compressor oils and cold starts. The trouble with our climate here is that Friday it was about 10 degrees Fahrenheit and today it will be 40 and close to 60 by Wednesday. It is not unusual for us to see 50 degree temp swings on a couple days, 70 in a month and a hundred through the year. With temp swings like that, there is no one size fits all oil. I do think I should switch to a synthetic, I know a couple of guys that use an Amsoil synthetic and swear by it. In the next few weeks I will be bringing all of the compressors into the shop and changing oil so I think I will probably make some changes then.

    #676100
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    If anyone is looking for a deal on the California Air compressor I saw this in their add at menards. It is for online order only.

    https://www.menards.com/main/p-1471978733565.htm?utm_campaign=15OS-2018&utm_content=Online-Extras&utm_source=wishabi&utm_medium=flyer_hosted

    And this one can be bought in store on sale.

    https://www.menards.com/main/p-1482823276079.htm?utm_campaign=15A-2018&utm_content=11%-Rebate-Sale&utm_source=flipp&utm_medium=flyer_hosted

    I am not selling or pushing these. Just sharing info.

    #676113
    monman1
    Pro

    Heres what i use in my compressors, and i have not had any trouble starting in the cold.

    Attachments:

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #676189
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Heres what i use in my compressors, and i have not had any trouble starting in the cold.

    I use the AMSOIL version of synthetic compressor fluid. Have used it for over 25 years in my main compressor and no problems.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #718189
    Arrien
    Pro

    I would look into Makita or California Air Tools.

    California Air Tools 1P1060S makes minimum noise. If be concrete its noise level is 56dB. When I opened for myself this technical characteristics at this site https://mygaragetool.com/best-wrench-air-compressors-reviews/ I enjoyed it. For me it is difficult to work when the machine makes serious noise. Then I think: great cry and little wool.

    #718209
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    . When I opened for myself this technical characteristics at this site I enjoyed it.

    I did not enjoy it.
    @ChadM did you enjoy it??

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #718223
    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    . When I opened for myself this technical characteristics at this site I enjoyed it.

    I did not enjoy it.
    @chadm did you enjoy it??

    While that may or may not be spam, I recently got a small California Air compressor and was very surprised with how quiet it is. The other surprise was how heavy it is. With an aluminum tank, I assumed the weight would be less than other comparable compressors.

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