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Parallel Guides for Track Saw

Viewing 8 posts - 21 through 28 (of 28 total)
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  • #305222
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    That’s true John, the portability would be great. You could easily pack those up in an l-boxx or systainer. I’m trying to iron out how I want to make mine.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #305350

    That is a pretty cool idea. I still like my stop rule for most cuts – it does not allow ripping a full sheet in half since the biggest one I can find goes just over 12 inches, but it does work for most cuts and is fast and accurate. I do have the Festool version and they work well for me. This version is pretty ingenious, though.

    Orange County, CA

    #305376
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’ve the Festool set. It is quite expensive when you consider there isn’t even a motor involved. Can’t even say I’ve used them enough to justify the price I paid years ago which was a lot lower than what they go for now in Canada.

    They have three design issues imo. They can fall off the back of the stock; and they can be a bit of a pain to get both of them to an exact same length; the mark for measuring is hard to see.

    People have come up with solutions to these issues, but like I said, I really don’t reach for them tht often and have not bothered to implement any of those self-fix solutions.

    #305540
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Those are neat, I am still sold on Scott’s use of the stop rule. I have visions of trying to make something for the mafell rails but I haven’t found a need yet (but some day maybe)

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #319415
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I came up with my own parallel guides for my tracks this week. I knew that I needed something that would let me avoid measuring and marking every time when doing rips so this is what I came up with. It basically consists of two guides and a jig for setting them.

    I was able to use the offcut of bench tape from my MPT cross cut jig and just remark the numbers with a sharpie. The tape is calibrated to account for the width of the track so whatever I set the stop to on the jig is what the actual rip width will be. I just set the measurement I want on the jig and then put each of the parallel guides on it and they register and lock at the same length. This way I am guaranteed that both parallel guides will be set exactly the same and thus a perfectly parallel rip cut. The guides just clamp to the work piece with a couple vise grip clamps. There are two other things that I like about this system. One is because the guides are clamped on you are guaranteed that your track won’t accidentally move in the direction of giving you a smaller piece while cutting so you’ll never have an undersized rip. The second is the guides aren’t attached to the rail so the rail isn’t anymore cumbersome to move around or set somewhere out of the way while getting the next piece ready. It’s a pretty low tech, low cost solution but it works really well and is very accurate.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #319438
    Doobie
    Moderator

    The clamping and unclamping would to me seem to make that slower than if they were affixed to the rail itself.

    I also can’t see them being independant of the rail being a benefit insofar as avoiding rail slippage issues unless your rail underside rubber needs replacing anyways.

    Not trying to be argumentative, just my observations and opinion.

    #319443
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    The clamping and unclamping would to me seem to make that slower than if they were affixed to the rail itself.

    I also can’t see them being independant of the rail being a benefit insofar as avoiding rail slippage issues unless your rail underside rubber needs replacing anyways.

    Not trying to be argumentative, just my observations and opinion.

    You’re right that the clamping does take a bit of extra time but I didn’t really want to have the guides attached to the rail since it would make it a little more cumbersome to maneuver. Also if I want to go from making a set rip cut to making a custom cut I don’t have to remove or adjust anything attached to the rails. The extra time clamping is a one downside though.

    Sorry I didn’t mean that the guides being independent of the rail help with slippage issues, it’s more the fact that the guides are clamped solid to the workpiece so the rail couldn’t accidentally get bumped backwards and give you a narrower finished piece. Not that it’s usually an issue since the tracks stick really well but it’s some added security.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #507078
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Here’s the video that I just did on the parallel guides that I posted about here.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

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