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Panel saw with finger savinr tech

Viewing 14 posts - 21 through 34 (of 34 total)
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  • #341927
    staker
    Pro

    A riving knife should be installed to help with kick back.

    #342184
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I know most schools, university and trade schools now use this type of teck.

    #342198
    Jummul
    Pro

    A riving knife should be installed to help with kick back.

    I didn’t know a riveting knife wasn’t included. What would be a reason for not installing one?

    #342228
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Here’s an oldie but goodie….

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u7sRrC2Jpp4&t=220

    Note how the teacher admits he’s an idiot doing what he did.

    Here’s a good little primer on TS kickback…

    http://www.raygirling.com/kickback.htm

    When you see someone using a table saw with the blade full height
    cutting 3/4 thick wood you will see a problem.

    I actually do this all the time, but I know what I’m doing and how to set up for it. Generally, I have the blade clearing the stock by an inch in regular use. I know many will argue that your teeth should just clear the stock….others can argue differently and again, it also can matter how you’re set up differently than someone else.

    That’s the thing with a lot of TS safety, there’s a lot to know and there is sometimes very little to really learn from. When I got my Unisaw after not having used a table saw for many years, I thought I knew what I was doing from having used table saws many times before, but I didn’t. First damn cut I did created a kickback. Scared the sh#t out of me, but that was a good thing. It made me re-educate myself.

    Problem was, the first place I reached for this was my owners manual which was pretty useless frankly other than safety warnings to the effect as don’t use the saw in a thunderstorm or when you are on crack.

    It took a while, but I did get to learn what was safe and what wasn’t, and after 15 years since I got that saw, I still feel there can always be more to learn about table safety, setups, and methods.

    Just look at the guy in the video. While he calls himself an idiot for doing what he did, he actually is not. He knows a lot, he just didn’t know it all and he learned that. That’s the most important thing he is teaching with having the courage to post that video at the expense of being ridiculed, the learning never stops. Those who ridicule him are the real idiots imo.

    #342279
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Well Doobie I have been woodworking over 30 years and have seen many fingers taken off or badly cut . Most the time if the blade had been down it could have been avoided. The guy in the video should not have been cutting a board that small on that saw. Sometimes you have to find other ways to make a cut. Experience is how we all learn.
    I almost took out the shop teacher in high school one day when a board kicked back out of the table saw. Just missed him and slammed into the block wall. I learned my lesson early!

    #342297
    staker
    Pro

    A riving knife should be installed to help with kick back.

    I didn’t know a riveting knife wasn’t included. What would be a reason for not installing one?

    Some saws don’t have them, or they are built into the guard. I don’t use a guard or a riving knife I don’t like the way the guards are made on the north americian saws or the asian imports. I need to make and install a riving knive on mine and they should be the same thickness as the blade you are using.

    #342458
    whitehill
    Pro
    Ottawa, ON

    I know most schools, university and trade schools now use this type of teck.

    And hopefully still teach students how to safely use a saw without it.
    There was a fatal accident in a high school shop class here a few years ago. Student cut into a drum that turned out to have previously contained peppermint oil, and it exploded. A number of schools subsequently closed their shop programs. I wonder how many of the kids in those schools are going to try doing their own home renos or whatever someday, and get injured because they have had no training about how to work safely with tools and machinery.

    #342463

    Some instructors have said regarding blade height – “how many fingers do you want to lose?” That always sticks with me when I am making my cuts. I agree a riving knife is the single biggest thing to help kick-back and increase safety.

    Orange County, CA

    #342563
    Doobie
    Moderator

    The guy in the video should not have been cutting a board that small on that saw.

    I also wouldn’t be using paddles like he did either. Hands are just to close for my liking.

    I have two of these hanging on a hook beside my table saw. I really like them and they are versatile for lots of other uses for pushing stock in the shop.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=30067&cat=1,240,45884

    Well Doobie I have been woodworking over 30 years and have seen many fingers taken off or badly cut . Most the time if the blade had been down it could have been avoided.

    I agree. I’ve cut lot’s with my blade higher when I chose to do so, but I’m well experienced and have the safeguards in place when I do so. I only do it with a pupose in mind, which is usually to minimize tearout even in using a zero clearance insert.

    If I was on a saw that only had the standard factory guard and riving knife, I would not be doing so likely especially with anything smallish or narrow or with any stock that was apt to have internal stresses that could be released in cutting such.

    I’m starting to think that the way I wrote my prior entry, I should have offered more detail such as I just added now. I certainly don’t want anybody to get the idea that it is OK to have their blade high in what they might ‘think’ are OK situations just by simply having basic safeguards and rudimentary knowledge of TS use.

    #342744
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Here’s an oldie but goodie….

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u7sRrC2Jpp4&t=220

    Note how the teacher admits he’s an idiot doing what he did.

    Man Doob that a wake up call for me!!! I’ve seen that one before and now use the riving knife. It’s amazing how fast you can loose a finger or three.

    #342828
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I don’t use a table saw every day. If I did, I would definitely get on board with as much safety stuff as possible. Even with the small amount of use that mine gets, I still follow as many safety procedures as possible. The riving knife is very important for me.

    #342844
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I have two of these hanging on a hook beside my table saw. I really like them and they are versatile for lots of other uses for pushing stock in the shop.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=30067&cat=1,240,45884

    Thank you for the link. That looks like a good solution.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #342889

    I am happy to see these advancements in safety technology. We accept it in many other aspects of our lives – circuit breakers instead of fuses, air bags in vehicles, GFI’s. As they make these improvements, competition will make the cost go down and it will add a small amount to the cost of the tool.

    #342990

    Is this a third technology that retracts the blade or a copy of Bosch or Sawstop? Sure looks like a table saw to me also…not sure where the term “Panel Saw” comes into play.

    This article I found says they collaborated with Saw Stop so I would assume it is their technology. However trashing a 16″ blade each time it trips along with the cartridge sounds very expensive. I personally think Bosch’s technology is better since you don’t trash the blade.

    http://www.fdmcdigital.com/ArticleDetails/tabid/162/ArticleID/95172/Default.aspx

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