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Panel saw with finger savinr tech

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 34 total)
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  • #341445
    staker
    Pro

    The saw has a 16 inch blade

    #341451

    Looks like this type of technology is making it to all kinds of saws.

    Orange County, CA

    #341454
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    That saw looks pretty awesome, looks like it will save the blade too.

    #341459
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Is this a third technology that retracts the blade or a copy of Bosch or Sawstop? Sure looks like a table saw to me also…not sure where the term “Panel Saw” comes into play.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #341461
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Is this a third technology that retracts the blade or a copy of Bosch or Sawstop? Sure looks like a table saw to me also…not sure where the term “Panel Saw” comes into play.

    This type of technology has been on the market for a bit now. As for “Panel Saw” maybe that just the translation from Italian to English??

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #341462
    whitehill
    Pro
    Ottawa, ON

    Thanks for posting, staker.
    I’ve noticed some really good deals on used Unisaws and similar machines in the last year. Now all the jobsite saws seem to be on big sales. I wonder if savvy owners, and the stores, are anticipating that saws without safety technology like this are going to be worth very little before long.
    The saw in the video gets the blade out of the way in the same manner as Bosch’s Reaxx saw. Unless there is some issue with that approach that isn’t common knowledge, I think it will be more popular than the Sawstop system.

    #341490
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Sure looks like a table saw to me also…not sure where the term “Panel Saw” comes into play.

    My understanding is a panel saw, or slider as they are also known, is designed with handling large panels in mind. A table saw is not without outrigging other components to do so without issues/difficulties in execution.

    #341531
    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    It’s for breaking down panels. There are also vertical panel saws.

    I don’t really understand why you’d need a saw stop on a machine like this. I used a totally different tablesaw for anything requiring close-to-the-blade work when I was a machine operator.

    #341535

    The sliding carriage is to facilitate cutting large panels and it is uses to straight line rough lumber or other cross-cuts. It is an industrial machine designed to run 24/7 and withstand operators playing beat the clock. Now with this design your hands are away from the blade and it is safer than pushing thin stock against a rip fence, but I think that this is a thing to come in the future on all saws for insurance and liability reasons and Griggio has beat other makers to the punch on this level of industrial equipment.

    Orange County, CA

    #341585
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The sliding carriage is to facilitate cutting large panels and it is uses to straight line rough lumber or other cross-cuts. It is an industrial machine designed to run 24/7 and withstand operators playing beat the clock. Now with this design your hands are away from the blade and it is safer than pushing thin stock against a rip fence, but I think that this is a thing to come in the future on all saws for insurance and liability reasons and Griggio has beat other makers to the punch on this level of industrial equipment.

    Thanks for the clarification MTJ.
    I hate to say it but I think it’s the wave of the future too.

    #341589
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I hate to say it but I think it’s the wave of the future too.

    The writting has been on the wall so to speak on them for some time now. Thing is, they take a huge footprint, and wallet, to accomodate. They are quite common in europe and getting moreso here in NA.

    #341664
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I am sure this technology will become mandatory in the future especially in the workplace once it gets a bit more development.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #341706
    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    I doubt it will be mandatory as there are too many other bladed tools that can’t be equipped with it. It’s hard to legislate “you have to have an expensive safety device on this spinning blade” when there are going to be guys climbing around in the trusses with wormdrives that can’t get the technology.

    #341707
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Its a nice looking saw but im really not into this new technology hype . If I don’t want to chop my fingers off then ill keep my fingers away from the blade just like I have for the last 35 years .So far it hasn’t cost me a penny extra either . If they add it to all tools with spinning blades then all the power to them . I still wont pay any extra .

    #341753
    Jummul
    Pro

    Seems like Bosch was right on time. I remember hearing about the Sawstop only a year ago and thinking how futurized it was. I can’t wait for this to become available in handheld saws just as drills now have Active Response.

    #341756
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I have used the safety stop saws and we all hated it. It gets real expensive when it trips . The problem we had is if there is any moisture in the wood it will trip. Then we had to catch hell from the boss because the saw was down and he had to buy the part again. I got to where I wouldn’t even use that saw . I used the old one. If you use a saw right and follow common sense and safety the old saws are just fine. When you see someone using a table saw with the blade full height
    cutting 3/4 thick wood you will see a problem. Its cheaper to teach employees the right way to use a saw in my opinion. Any time I ever got hurt it was my own fault. Usually rushing was the problem.

    #341763
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Another vote against what is becoming forced safety technology to protect me from the bozo who will never use my saw.

    #341768
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Another vote against what is becoming forced safety technology to protect me from the bozo who will never use my saw.

    What sucks the most is we will all have to pay more whether we like it or not .

    #341791
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I have used the safety stop saws and we all hated it. It gets real expensive when it trips . The problem we had is if there is any moisture in the wood it will trip. Then we had to catch hell from the boss because the saw was down and he had to buy the part again. I got to where I wouldn’t even use that saw . I used the old one. If you use a saw right and follow common sense and safety the old saws are just fine. When you see someone using a table saw with the blade full height
    cutting 3/4 thick wood you will see a problem. Its cheaper to teach employees the right way to use a saw in my opinion. Any time I ever got hurt it was my own fault. Usually rushing was the problem.

    There is no replacement for knowing how to safely use a tool. This technology is a nice “feature”, but that doesn’t mean I’d let my 2 year old play with it 😉

    Accidents happen to pros who know how to use tools all the time for many reasons. IMO, proper technique and just plan old Paying Attention should be top priority in preventing injury and blade stopping/retracting technology is to minimize injury when those things aren’t enough.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #341822
    Doobie
    Moderator

    People I feel are being led to believe with this technology that their Table Saws are now safe. I myself am more worried about kick or throw back when I use my saw than slicing my fingers off. I could survive more than likely a sliced finger(s), but a board impaling into my gut or face not so much.

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