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Outside storage shed what to get?

  • This topic has 74 replies, 25 voices, and was last updated 4 years ago by CB.
Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 75 total)
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  • #619301
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Good topic. I am also wanting to build a shed this year. I am pretty sure I will go wood. I am going to have to see how big I can build before needing a permit. I kind of want to make a screened in area to sit in on the front. Tired of the bugs biting me as soon as the sun goes down.

    #619303
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Whatever size you decide on I suggest to go a bit bigger lol, You’ll be glad you did in the long run

    That’s sound advice ! Whether it’s a shop, shed or garage, whatever you think is “big enough” never is

    That’s right. I already wish mine was bigger. lol Thinking about adding a 12×30 spray room onto it.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

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    #619312
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    The Amish always make their spray room unattached Ron. They say if there is ever a fire it won’t burn everything down. Kinda makes sense to me also.

    #619313
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    The Amish always make their spray room unattached Ron. They say if there is ever a fire it won’t burn everything down. Kinda makes sense to me also.

    That makes sense Ron. Might have to think on that one a little.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #619322
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I agree having a wood shed is the way to go. I am not sure is cheaper. I have 2 sheds and small car tent. I built my shed when I bought my place. Then few years later I need a place store my Atv and lumber. So I bought a car tent. Which I have replace every few years. Then about 4 years ago I need place kids bikes & toys for the winter. I bought a small metal shed. I don’t think I would buy metal again. It is pain put together and the doors are pain to open. I also build wood floor to put this shed on. Really this shed isn’t big enough. But the size of my lot I can’t have any bigger. When I built my shed I bought all my lumber from local mill and work a few hours every night after work for about week until I had done. I would say I was just over a week to a 12 x 8 shed.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #619336
    CB
    Spectator

    I’ve installed a row of plastic sheds, instead of a single large shed, in a community where there was a restriction on building a shed, but plastic sheds were considered temporary, not much different than a garbage can or a children’s plastic or inflatable playhouse.

    Where a stick built shed had a square footage limitation, and a lot line set back restriction, a plastic shed was not subjected to the same rules or scrutiny, and could be all the way up against a fence, without generating a concern or a complaint.

    Mind you, none of the foregoing is really logical, but the enactment and interpretation of regulations never really is, and is usually left to the judgment of the person empowered to enforce them. And in this case, plastic sheds were not something the person in power was concerned about.

    So there are some situations where plastic sheds might be useful. But they are certainly not as secure, nor as sustainable in snow country, hurricane country, tornado country, or blistering sun UV exposure country. But in mild climates, they can last. The row of 8 plastic sheds I installed 15 years ago is still standing.

    It helps if they are on stable ground. To save money on pouring a slab, I bought several sheets of 2″ thick 4×8 Styrofoam insulation panels, and capped the perimeters with sheet metal angle. Sort of like a floating floor. A little out of the box, but looking back 15 years later, it seems to have worked.

    #619341
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Where a stick built shed had a square footage limitation, and a lot line set back restriction, a plastic shed was not subjected to the same rules or scrutiny, and could be all the way up against a fence, without generating a concern or a complaint.

    That’s different from my municipality. Here, all structures, whether they require a permit or not, are subject to setback rules, height limits, and other rules like not having windows facing directly towards a neighbor’s property etc. People break these rules all the time, but they are there nonetheless.

    #619355
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    sheds and small car tent. I built my shed when I bought my place. Then few years later I need a place store my Atv and lumber. So I bought a car tent. Which I have replace every few years. Then about 4 years ago I need place kids bikes & toys for the winter. I bought a small metal shed. I don’t think I would buy metal again. It is pain put together and the doors are pain to open. I also build wood floor to put this shed on. Really this shed isn’t big enough. But the size of my lot I can’t have any bigger. When I built my shed I bought all my lumber from local mill and work a few hours every night after work for about week until I had done. I would say I was just over a week to a 12 x 8 shed.

    would you rebuild your shed to have insulation? I am thinking of building a workshop and was thinking I could do with an insulated larger shed/workshop.

    #619366
    Doobie
    Moderator

    doobie, the dormer is cool not something you see often on a shed, its a good way of adding windows higher up to allow extra light but keep them up high enough so people cant see whats inside

    I did it largely to visually break up the tallishness look of the shed. The side entrance overhang needn’t be either, but it also helps break up the look also.

    The upper storage loft may not even get real windows. I might install those fake ones instead. Having window light up there is really of no benefit. It’s strictly a storage area.

    I will also ad a roofed area at the back to break up the look also. It will be unattached to the main structure so as to avoid getting a permit. It’ll be used as a place to do gardening potting and also as an easy covered location to put our bikes in the summer.

    #619391
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    doobie, the dormer is cool not something you see often on a shed, its a good way of adding windows higher up to allow extra light but keep them up high enough so people cant see whats inside

    I did it largely to visually break up the tallishness look of the shed. The side entrance overhang needn’t be either, but it also helps break up the look also.

    The upper storage loft may not even get real windows. I might install those fake ones instead. Having window light up there is really of no benefit. It’s strictly a storage area.

    I will also ad a roofed area at the back to break up the look also. It will be unattached to the main structure so as to avoid getting a permit. It’ll be used as a place to do gardening potting and also as an easy covered location to put our bikes in the summer.

    Did you get any siding up yet?? Any pics?

    #619415
    Doobie
    Moderator

    doobie, the dormer is cool not something you see often on a shed, its a good way of adding windows higher up to allow extra light but keep them up high enough so people cant see whats inside

    I did it largely to visually break up the tallishness look of the shed. The side entrance overhang needn’t be either, but it also helps break up the look also.

    The upper storage loft may not even get real windows. I might install those fake ones instead. Having window light up there is really of no benefit. It’s strictly a storage area.

    I will also ad a roofed area at the back to break up the look also. It will be unattached to the main structure so as to avoid getting a permit. It’ll be used as a place to do gardening potting and also as an easy covered location to put our bikes in the summer.

    Did you get any siding up yet?? Any pics?

    Not yet. It’s still sitting all wrapped in my driveway since December. Not enough available time right now to get back to it and the weather is still too wintery still off and on.

    #619421
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    I want to build a shed to store things. Not really looking to build something to have a workshop in. I’m not even going to have electricity in it.

    #619491

    I want to build a shed to store things. Not really looking to build something to have a workshop in. I’m not even going to have electricity in it.

    Everyone needs a nice big storage locker

    I find that the more you keep things flexible and multipurpose, the less you regret not planning ahead though. And a usable “cabin” is something that helps if you ever try to sell your home as well.

    Id like to build one that could be a nice lumber storage and hand tool shop in summer and a storage building all winter.

    #619498
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I want to build a shed to store things. Not really looking to build something to have a workshop in. I’m not even going to have electricity in it.

    That seems to be a sensible approach; a place to put the summer stuff in winter and the winter stuff in summer. Having a shed really keeps the clutter in the yard under control.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #619506
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    That’s right. I already wish mine was bigger. lol Thinking about adding a 12×30 spray room onto it.

    I know what you mean Ron. I wish I could have build a bigger garage on my property.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #619516
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    I want to build a shed to store things. Not really looking to build something to have a workshop in. I’m not even going to have electricity in it.

    That seems to be a sensible approach; a place to put the summer stuff in winter and the winter stuff in summer. Having a shed really keeps the clutter in the yard under control.

    Exactly. If there is room to store lumber for projects fine. If I wanted to work out of it in the summer I can always run a extension chord out it it 🙂

    #619526
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I want to build a shed to store things. Not really looking to build something to have a workshop in. I’m not even going to have electricity in it.

    That seems to be a sensible approach; a place to put the summer stuff in winter and the winter stuff in summer. Having a shed really keeps the clutter in the yard under control.

    Exactly. If there is room to store lumber for projects fine. If I wanted to work out of it in the summer I can always run a extension chord out it it 🙂

    Lumber storage is easy. Just drill holes in the framing to accept lengths of 3/4″ EMT and you’re good to go. EMT is cheap and easy to get and plenty strong enough.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

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    #619596
    CB
    Spectator

    … rules like not having windows facing directly towards a neighbor’s property etc.

    Rules for which way a window faces only apply to homeowners down here. Developers, on the other hand, are routinely permitted to build rows of houses so close together (with windows facing each other) that neighbors can literally reach out and shake hands through the second floor windows. They can hear every time you flush the toilet. And their bathtub shower is closer to yours as the crow would fly (or hop) than your own bed.

    They don’t worry about lot line set backs or which way windows face when it comes to big developers bringing in big bucks to build new subdivisions of “technically” single family homes but in reality more like condo complexes with non shared walls separated by an alley just wide enough to fit an air conditioning unit.

    But let a lone remodeler try to update a dilapidated home. That’s when the big fat rule book gets dredged out.

    #619599
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    … rules like not having windows facing directly towards a neighbor’s property etc.

    Rules for which way a window faces only apply to homeowners down here. Developers, on the other hand, are routinely permitted to build rows of houses so close together (with windows facing each other) that neighbors can literally reach out and shake hands through the second floor windows. They can hear every time you flush the toilet. And their bathtub shower is closer to yours as the crow would fly (or hop) than your own bed.

    They don’t worry about lot line set backs or which way windows face when it comes to big developers bringing in big bucks to build new subdivisions of “technically” single family homes but in reality more like condo complexes with non shared walls separated by an alley just wide enough to fit an air conditioning unit.

    But let a lone remodeler try to update a dilapidated home. That’s when the big fat rule book gets dredged out.

    Fire regs here control the placement, total area and alignment of windows for all new homes or renovations, no exceptions. Setback allows greater flexibility but still carefully controlled.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #619603
    CB
    Spectator

    Down here, they utilize the legal mechanism of “Application for Variance”. They’ll get a statement from the Fire Marshall of sufficient mitigation, yadda yadda. What is really going on behind the scenes is that the City got the Developer to commit funds toward beautifying a median strip down an arterial corridor, or paid to fund a promise that the mayor got elected for… and the rules get bent. Legally. Lots of “exceptions” for the well connected and well heeled.

    But most working stiffs need to follow the rules, including those governing the set back, height, placement, square footage, and number of out buildings such as sheds and carports. Separating the function of pure storage from the function of “shop” is one way to conform to the rules, and probably is worth consideration for anyone planning an outbuilding of any type, if subject to municipal constraints.

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