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osha ?

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 74 total)
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  • #395696
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    I have has them stop by.

    keep you ducks in a row. and you’ll be fine.

    they’re interested in fall protection mostly. that’s what they target, lately, employ safety as always.

    #395947
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It is basic stuff. They want to see grounds on the cords and all the ladders set up the right way.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #396079
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    It is basic stuff. They want to see grounds on the cords and all the ladders set up the right way.

    And they like to see the basics…wear those safety glasses! I can’t tell you how sites I have been on where there wasn’t a pair of safety glasses in sight.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #396134
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It is basic stuff. They want to see grounds on the cords and all the ladders set up the right way.

    And they like to see the basics…wear those safety glasses! I can’t tell you how sites I have been on where there wasn’t a pair of safety glasses in sight.

    Yea a 4$ safety glasses can save you eye!

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #396246
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    save you a fine too.

    #396252
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    It is basic stuff. They want to see grounds on the cords and all the ladders set up the right way.

    And they like to see the basics…wear those safety glasses! I can’t tell you how sites I have been on where there wasn’t a pair of safety glasses in sight.

    How do they feel about respirators? I’d be hard pressed to find one except for right near my spray rig…ear plugs and safety glasses on the other hand are plentiful.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #396259

    When OSHA comes around we usually just stop working and clean up while they are there. You don’t want them to see you working.

    it’s common practice around here that if the contractor knows OSHA is coming by for a scheduled visit, they’ll give the whole crew the day off paid except for like the foreman and one or 2 other guys who will be working ultra safe that day. (I’m talking union commercial jobs)

    I have never had that happen , in fact they don’t schedule a show up. They just stop by and start filming.

    scheduled visits are very rare.

    #396270
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    If you use respirators, you need blood tests on your employees, a baseline and one every year. With the new silica rules, you can hardly get by without them if you cut or grind concrete, especially dry cutting.

    #396325
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    How do they feel about respirators?

    Here in the states you need to be fitted for the respirator and have at least 2 hours training to use one.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #438215
    crotalusco
    Pro
    west bend, wi

    On the topic, Have any of you ever called OSHA in for things others were doing that put you at risk? I know most of you wont run into it often in residential but im sure it could happen

    #438224
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    On the topic, Have any of you ever called OSHA in for things others were doing that put you at risk? I know most of you wont run into it often in residential but im sure it could happen

    This has come up here before and I think the general consensus is to keep quiet unless its a big safety issue. Calling OSHA would likely end in termination (rightfully or not) and probably make it more difficult to find other employment as people talk between companies.

    I’d like to think that I’d speak up and say something, but you never know until the situation arises.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #438240
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Have never called, but have witnessed them rush in like a swat team at Eastman Kodak in Johnson City, TN. Was there with my brothers on a valve outage, and the plant manager on duty that night was making a guy submerge himself under water in what they call “black water” they use to produce x-ray film tiles…he was in the hospital for the next month with severe lung problems.

    #438257
    whitehill
    Pro
    Ottawa, ON

    Working safely can be a pain sometimes, slows you down, less comfortable, whatever. Easy to think you don’t need to follow that procedure or use that gear… until it does matter. Recently a fellow died in our neighborhood after a fall on a construction site. I was driving by later and couldn’t see anywhere that was high enough to seem a hazard. A reminder that the outcome can be more serious than we estimate.

    #438326
    Calidecks64
    Pro
    Anaheim Hills, Cali

    The best thing to do when OSHA pops on your site, is roll up your crew and send them home right there on the spot. Doesn’t matter if they see it, they don’t give any breaks for anything anyway. so your best bet is to minimize your violations.

    #438366
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Recently a fellow died in our neighborhood after a fall on a construction site. I was driving by later and couldn’t see anywhere that was high enough to seem a hazard.

    Anything over 6 feet is tie off time. Just look at what happened to one of our own here at a very safe level.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #438462
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Anything over 6 feet is tie off time. Just look at what happened to one of our own here at a very safe level.

    Amazing I know but that is the reg.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #438466
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Recently a fellow died in our neighborhood after a fall on a construction site. I was driving by later and couldn’t see anywhere that was high enough to seem a hazard.

    Anything over 6 feet is tie off time. Just look at what happened to one of our own here at a very safe level.

    That’s right. You just never know.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #438498
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    The best thing to do when OSHA pops on your site, is roll up your crew and send them home right there on the spot. Doesn’t matter if they see it, they don’t give any breaks for anything anyway. so your best bet is to minimize your violations.

    As soon as we knew they were in the neighbourhood we would shut down and split before they got to us 🙂

    #438499
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The rules may seem like a PITA, but it is a significantly bigger PITA if you have a serious injury on a site. The fines and hit to a reputation can put you out of business.

    My biggest issue is when you provide your people with the equipment and as soon as you leave the site they quit using it. In that situation, you are still responsible even it they do not do what they are told to do for safety.

    #438574
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    My biggest issue is when you provide your people with the equipment and as soon as you leave the site they quit using it. In that situation, you are still responsible even it they do not do what they are told to do for safety.

    I guess you have to have someone on site at all time that have your co. best interest in mind.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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