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OSHA Tip of the day

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 94 total)
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  • #64542
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    But you did not answer this question

    What if the guard gets in the way of use Say on a 7¼” Skil saw

    If you give up I can help you out

    So say is this a good idea even if you disengage it right after use?

    #64564
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    Matt in the nicest way possible, that is exactly why if you use the tool everyday you should never have your guards pinned up, because someone else may come over and chop off body parts. I am a firm believer that guards on tools are a necessity (especially in a business environment) if they were for ” recommended” use, they would not even be on the tool. Guards are proven to save lives and even if you work with that tool all day everyday and know everything there is to know, you should ALWAYS use the guards.

    Amen, you’re preaching to the choir here. I know a lot of old timers that do it, but I don’t work with them and wouldn’t want to.

    #64621
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    OSHA Tip of the day #3:Sound Level

    OSHA recommends that workplace noise levels be kept below 85 dBA as an
    8-hour time-weighted average. As the noise level increases, it damages your
    hearing more quickly.

    So that means don’t keep your PowerBox on high all day 🙂

    #64626
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    BOT, what do you do when the guard is in the way and it needs pinned up? In this case you do not have the option of using your other hand to hold the guard up.
    How do you like the 6d nail mounted in the upper guard to hold up the lower guard?

    #64637
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    BOT, what do you do when the guard is in the way and it needs pinned up? In this case you do not have the option of using your other hand to hold the guard up.<br>
    How do you like the 6d nail mounted in the upper guard to hold up the lower guard?

    I can only assume something like this is the way to go – I know it sometimes happens that there’s no other way to make the cut.

    I wonder though if the official stance supports that – so long as the saw isn’t put down / leaves your control with the pin still in place. For me it’s a rare thing but I could see it being more common for others who use their circular saw more than I do.

    #64973
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    OSHA Tip of the day #3: Major Elements of OSHA’s Lead Standard

    • A permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 50
    micrograms of lead per cubic meter of air,
    as averaged over an 8-hour period.
    • Requirements that employers use engineering
    controls and work practices, where
    feasible, to reduce worker exposure.
    • Requirements that employees observe
    good personal hygiene practices, such as
    washing hands before eating and taking a
    shower before leaving the worksite.
    • Requirements that employees be provided
    with protective clothing and, where necessary,
    with respiratory protection accordance
    with 29 CFR 1910.134.

    #228523

    Just an FYI guys – OSHA reporting requirements change on Jan 1st – http://www.protoolreviews.com/news/osha-reporting-requirements-2015/12829/

    John S

    #228540
    jstare
    Pro
    Langley, BC

    I couldn’t agree more with only temporarily locking open guards when the need arises. When you walk away it should be back in place in case the next person uses it.

    I have a friend who used a circular saw with the guard locked open by someone else, he made the cut and because he is so used to the guard closing on its own he put it down on the ground with the blade still spinning. The saw grabbed and kicked, and cut through his work boot right behind the steel toe portion, he got lucky but had to have surgery to repair his pinky toe and missed about 6 months of work while healing and re-habbing his foot. Its not worth having this happen to you or someone else.

    #228907
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I have a friend who used a circular saw with the guard locked open by someone else, he made the cut and because he is so used to the guard closing on its own he put it down on the ground with the blade still spinning. The saw grabbed and kicked, and cut through his work boot right behind the steel toe portion, he got lucky but had to have surgery to repair his pinky toe and missed about 6 months of work while healing and re-habbing his foot. Its not worth having this happen to you or someone else.

    The rule is you never set the saw on the blade or blade guard. There is a right way and wrong way to set a saw down. Also if it was his responsibility to let the guard down before he used the saw if he didn’t know how to use the saw with the guard up and it sounds like he didn’t.

    #228976
    ProTom
    Pro
    Bear Lake, MI

    Old timers would always pin/tie/remove lower guards on circular saws.
    One time when I was around 12 I watched my dad almost cut his arm off with the guard pinned up. He was ripping ply wood and it bound up kicked back and cut his forearm down to the bone. The forearm of the arm that was holding the saw.
    If the guard was not pinned it would have never cut his arm. He always used saws with the guard pinned for 40+ years until that happened.
    Lucky he only needed stitches, but he never pinned another guard after that.

    Always learning, and some teaching along the way.

    #228982
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    OSHA Tip of the day #3:Sound Level

    OSHA recommends that workplace noise levels be kept below 85 dBA as an
    8-hour time-weighted average. As the noise level increases, it damages your
    hearing more quickly.

    So that means don’t keep your PowerBox on high all day :)

    Thanks for the tips. Some sites have no clue what safety is!

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #229116
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    That happened to me a long time ago.
    Cut through boot. BUT didn’t even touch the sock.
    I was So lucky, learned from it for sure.

    #229121
    TonyG
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    That happened to me a long time ago.
    Cut through boot. BUT didn’t even touch the sock.
    I was So lucky, learned from it for sure.

    When I was helping my dad build my shed that happened to him. He didn’t pin the guard open it just didn’t close by itself like it was supposed to it kicked back the only thing that it cut was the extension cord.

    #229129
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    That happened to me a long time ago.
    Cut through boot. BUT didn’t even touch the sock.
    I was So lucky, learned from it for sure.

    That would get my attention for sure.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #229164
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    That would get my attention for sure.

    Sure did, Will never happen again.

    #229461
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    When using a saw with the guard up it is key to let your finger off the trigger before you are through the wood so the blade stops right after it goes through the wood.

    #229581
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    When using a saw with the guard up it is key to let your finger off the trigger before you are through the wood so the blade stops right after it goes through the wood.

    There is a good tip. Thank you

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #231163
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    Thought I would add one:

    Balance the weight of your tool belt.

    Tool belts sure are small and handy but they have the ability to pull your body out of alignment. That is unless you keep its weight balanced. If you find that one side of your belt is heavier than the other, then make the necessary adjustments by transferring tools to the lighter side.

    http://www.safetyservicescompany.com/industry-category/construction/5-safety-tips-for-construction-workers-on-avoiding-stress-and-injury/

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #231168
    TonyG
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    OSHA Tip of the day #3:Sound Level

    OSHA recommends that workplace noise levels be kept below 85 dBA as an
    8-hour time-weighted average. As the noise level increases, it damages your
    hearing more quickly.

    So that means don’t keep your PowerBox on high all day :)

    So that’s what happened to the hearing in my right ear!

    #231172
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I read these guard open accident posts and I gotta say, Never rely on any safety appliance to save you from injury. They aren’t perfect either and can fail, In the cases of it kicking back and cutting your arm or the cord the guard may or may not have been quick enough to protect ya anyway.

    Could/would ya blame it on the guard for not saving ya? Could/would ya sue the manufacturer for it? Just something to think about while I go get me a cup of that Mcdanalds coffee

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