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OSHA Tip of the day

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  • #62516
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I thought since I was OSHA 10 hr. certified it would make sense to share a tip of the day (or whenever I am able to log onto the forum).

    *Disclaimer* I am not a government official or OSHA training instructor. Always contact OSHA or your local governing body if you have any questions. These tips are meant as a guide and do not necessarily represent the most current rule and regulations. I will always try and reference the OSHA handbook page and ref# when posting.

    #62517
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Tip of the day #1: What are the capacity requirements for all
    scaffolds?

    Answer: Each scaffold and scaffold component must
    support without failure its own weight and at least
    four times the maximum intended load applied or
    transmitted to it. 1926.451(a)(1)

    #62521
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    We are governed by HIOSHA out here , the state office and all military work doesn’t fall under this because it’s on fed land and has much stricter rules. But yea I have my 30hr. cert. 3 times over.

    #62530
    redwood
    Pro

    Tip of the day #1: What are the capacity requirements for all<br>
    scaffolds?

    Answer: Each scaffold and scaffold component must<br>
    support without failure its own weight and at least<br>
    four times the maximum intended load applied or<br>
    transmitted to it. 1926.451(a)(1)

    So, I have some scaffolding. All the paperwork is gone, as are the labels. How much weight can I put on it?

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #62532
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Oh,,,, stickers are gone cut it up and throw it away!

    #62537
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Where I live scaffolding is inspected every year in rental stores .

    #62548
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Tip of the day #1: What are the capacity requirements for all<br><br>
    scaffolds?

    Answer: Each scaffold and scaffold component must<br><br>
    support without failure its own weight and at least<br><br>
    four times the maximum intended load applied or<br><br>
    transmitted to it. 1926.451(a)(1)

    So, I have some scaffolding. All the paperwork is gone, as are the labels. How much weight can I put on it?

    Great question, I just scanned the regs and couldn’t find anything on this. I think this may become subjective by an inspector but as long as you don’t have a failure or reportable injury then you should be A OK πŸ™‚

    #62662
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It’s kinda like torquing nuts down without a torque wrench Mark, The general rule is; A half a pound before it snaps.

    #62663
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Here are some interesting rules and regulations for scaffolding . There a few that I didn,t even know .
    http://www.gov.pe.ca/law/regulations/pdf/O&01-01-2.pdf

    #63614
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Here is my tip of the day
    Never ever lean a A-frame ladder ageist anything to use it! It must always be opened like it’s intended use, as a A-Frame. Also never stand on the top of the ladder or the top step as is indicated on the ladder. Most jobsite accidents happen from a ladder.

    #64201
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Gee, I’ve leaned em against a wall lots of times. I thought that was ok. I learned the hard way about standing on the top step. I knew at the time it was a bad idea but I figured “I’d be careful”, And I was till I found myself laying flat on my back gasping for air. Luckily it was only a 6 footer and I landed on grass.

    #64245
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Tip of the day #2: Guards (As it pertains to power tools)

    The exposed moving parts of power tools need to be safeguarded.
    Belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums,
    flywheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating, or moving parts
    of equipment must be guarded.
    Machine guards, as appropriate, must be provided to protect the
    operator and others from the following:
    β€’ Point of operation.
    β€’ In-running nip points.
    β€’ Rotating parts.
    β€’ Flying chips and sparks.
    Safety guards must never be removed when a tool is being used.
    Portable circular saws having a blade greater than 2 inches (5.08
    centimeters) in diameter must be equipped at all times with guards.
    An upper guard must cover the entire blade of the saw. A retractable
    lower guard must cover the teeth of the saw, except where it
    makes contact with the work material. The lower guard must
    automatically return to the covering position when the tool is
    withdrawn from the work material.

    #64248
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Tip of the day #2: Guards (As it pertains to power tools)

    The exposed moving parts of power tools need to be safeguarded.<br>
    Belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums,<br>
    flywheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating, or moving parts<br>
    of equipment must be guarded.<br>
    Machine guards, as appropriate, must be provided to protect the<br>
    operator and others from the following:<br>
    β€’ Point of operation.<br>
    β€’ In-running nip points.<br>
    β€’ Rotating parts.<br>
    β€’ Flying chips and sparks.<br>
    Safety guards must never be removed when a tool is being used.<br>
    Portable circular saws having a blade greater than 2 inches (5.08<br>
    centimeters) in diameter must be equipped at all times with guards.<br>
    An upper guard must cover the entire blade of the saw. A retractable<br>
    lower guard must cover the teeth of the saw, except where it<br>
    makes contact with the work material. The lower guard must<br>
    automatically return to the covering position when the tool is<br>
    withdrawn from the work material.

    What if the guard gets in the way of use Say on a 7ΒΌ” Skil saw

    #64276
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I have employees that will never set the band saw guard down. I had to put a piece of tape on the guard and when they got done working for the day the tape was still there. Needless to say I had to write them up. If someone hacks their arm off on a saw and OSHA is called it it wouldn’t look good if the guard was a foot too high.

    #64316
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    Well make sure you have some steel toes, and maybe steel ankles and shins: πŸ™‚

    #64320
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    In all seriousness though, I think guys who have their guards pinned up are probably more aware of their tools. The worry would be when someone else unfamiliar with the tool picks it up – which I guess could be karma if your tool is stolen, not so much for the new guy on the crew though πŸ™‚

    #64329
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    Dirty, that video reminds me of the dozens of safety video’s we had to watch during the OSHA certification.

    They opened up the class by telling us a story of how a guy had his balls explode because he fell from a lift and didn’t have his safety harness tightened properly. If that doesn’t give you chills I don’t know what would.

    #64330
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    Wow Jason, that’s one I wouldn’t want to witness. One I was surprised at was air compressor safety. Looking at photos of air compressor accidents where a tank failed or a compressor head was leaking oil into the tank and the fumes ignited. Some super scary stuff. When I bought my used compressor I was pretty paranoid about checking the tank thickness, even then I was nowhere near it the first time I pressurized it.

    #64393
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Geez, I felt like I was on the job again watching that safety film, I’ve had to watch hundreds maybe even into the thousands of them during my career. Some are good and some are stupid.

    #64398
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    In all seriousness though, I think guys who have their guards pinned up are probably more aware of their tools. The worry would be when someone else unfamiliar with the tool picks it up – which I guess could be karma if your tool is stolen, not so much for the new guy on the crew though :)

    Matt in the nicest way possible, that is exactly why if you use the tool everyday you should never have your guards pinned up, because someone else may come over and chop off body parts. I am a firm believer that guards on tools are a necessity (especially in a business environment) if they were for ” recommended” use, they would not even be on the tool. Guards are proven to save lives and even if you work with that tool all day everyday and know everything there is to know, you should ALWAYS use the guards.

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

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