dcsimg

Old concrete basement floor – resurface or replace?

This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  bruparto 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #726083

    My first post, so thank you in advance!

    I just bought an old house with a concrete basement floor with extensive surface scaling. Otherwise, it doesn’t have any cracks/foundation issues and the basement is (now) dry.

    The previous owners only partially removed some very old tile and then covered the entire floor with 2″ thick rubber mats that kept in a lot of moisture from two (now fixed) leaky pipes.

    Ideally I’d like to resurface the floor with something self leveling. Is that a terrible idea? I’m on a budget and would like to avoid replacing the floor, but don’t want to set myself up for certain disaster later.

    #726093

    Doobie
    Pro

    Question….what do you want to use the space for?

    #726094

    Probably a spare bedroom or entertainment space, not quite sure yet. But I don’t imagine putting carpeting down.

    #726123

    Doobie
    Pro

    Probably a spare bedroom or entertainment space, not quite sure yet. But I don’t imagine putting carpeting down.

    Then you need not worry about imperfections then most likely for the most part. You could lay an insulated or non insulated subfloor system once you’ve maybe removed with a concrete floor scrapper/grinding machine or a hand held concrete surface grinder you can rent to smooth off any chunky motar or glue residues from the old tiles or whatever were there before, ignore most of the ‘potholes’ there maybe filling in only the worse ones by hand with mortar patches, and lay subfloor panels over top where you can lay almost anything you want.

    There all sorts of different kinds of sub flooring panel systems you can use. Provided you truly have no severe moisture or wetness issues down there and your floor is moderately level thruout, that’s the way to go. There will be some slope to the floor typicallyif done right towards what is a floor drain in most basements somewhere. Do not block the drain with subfloor.

    https://www.lowes.com/search?searchTerm=sub+flooring

    Installed correctly, you can turn that grungy old basement into a proper living space. Can you think of any reason this wouldn’t solve your issue Mike?

    Here’s some different concrete surface grinders….

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/tool-and-vehicle-rental/p.concrete-floor-grinder.09015.html&ved=2ahUKEwitq7HAh5vjAhXIVs0KHU_XBK8QFjAKegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw1jTfHX-AufjxHZYIWu9nQo

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/tool-and-vehicle-rental/p.concrete-floor-grinder.09015.html&ved=2ahUKEwitq7HAh5vjAhXIVs0KHU_XBK8QFjAKegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw1jTfHX-AufjxHZYIWu9nQo

    https://www.homedepot.ca/product/bosch-5-inch-concrete-surfacing-grinder-with-dedicated-dust-collection-shroud/1001168827?eid=PS_GOOGLE_E-Comm_GGL_Shopping_PLA_EN_Power+Tools_Power+Tools_PLA_EN__PRODUCT_GROUP_pla-327236419169&gclsrc=aw.ds&&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_vy5wIeb4wIV2rjACh3mGQOQEAsYCCABEgIejvD_BwE

    @bruparto

    #726269

    Thanks so much for the advice, I really appreciate it.

    A concrete contractor came to look at it and his opinion was to smooth it out and put another layer of concrete between 1/2″ and 3″ thick depending on the section. It’s about 850sqft and he priced it at $2,500.

    I prefer the idea suggested here of just grinding the existing floor and putting subfloor on top of it since it’s cheaper. I’ll be putting subfloor down regardless. But are there any downsides to putting another layer down (except that I’ll lose some height)?

    #726300

    Doobie
    Pro

    You’d lose an inch and a half to two inches for the subfloor itself depending on which one you go with. The ones with a foam type base are thicker the more insulative they are. Plus add whatever you would be laying over top of it.

    The real potential issue with putting down any kind of subfloor is water. If you get a bit of water under it, maybe not a problem. But enough water, then the OSB top of the subfloor will delaminate and the whole thing needs to ripped out.

    #726457

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Thanks so much for the advice, I really appreciate it.

    A concrete contractor came to look at it and his opinion was to smooth it out and put another layer of concrete between 1/2″ and 3″ thick depending on the section. It’s about 850sqft and he priced it at $2,500.

    I prefer the idea suggested here of just grinding the existing floor and putting subfloor on top of it since it’s cheaper. I’ll be putting subfloor down regardless. But are there any downsides to putting another layer down (except that I’ll lose some height)?

    I would say this option really depends on the concrete mix design they use and proper floor preparation. You do not indicate where you are located, but this is not the project for just any concrete “guy”

    Special mix designs are required to get the mix to work as thin as 1/2″ in addition to bonding agents and special fibers in the concrete. I would not hire anyone to do this unless they really “know their stuff” and would want a detailed proposal of everything they will do. If something like this is not done right, you end up removing and replacing the work and what they add just doubles the removal work.

    Many times I have seen where a concrete guy says he can just feather it out over the thin areas and as soon as he leaves, the feathered area is cracking and coming loose. You do not want this.

    #726460

    That’s helpful insight. I’m in the Cleveland area.

    Since this apparently isn’t a simple job and because of needing special mixes for 1/2″ thin concrete, what would be your advice on the most practical and economical solution, given my goal of putting down subflooring?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 0.242 seconds