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New Stanley Bailey Block Plane

This topic contains 17 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  JimDaddyO 2 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 18 posts - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #603700

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    My wife didn’t know what to buy me for our anniversary. So she gave me a gift card for Amazon. She told me to buy a tool that would I like to have. So I bought a block plane. I know it is no Veritas or Lie Nilsen block plane. And I am not Norm Abrams or Roy Underhill. So I think this plane will do the job for now. I always wanted one. But never came across any 2nd hand ones that were cheap enough to buy.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #603701

    What model?

    A bad plane can work just as well if you’re willing to invest the time into getting it well tuned, and accept that it may be harder to accurately adjust and keep tuned

    I doubt anything Stanley is a bad plane, so a “just ok” plane can be made to sing

    Enjoy it

    #603704

    There is plenty of material out there about truing and sharpening hand planes. That aspect seems to separate some makes from the Veritas and Lie-Nielsen which come ready to go out of the box so to speak. If that’s a new subject for you, I would encourage you to dive into that. Stanley block planes have been an industry standard. Have fun making shavings.

    #603705

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    What model?

    A bad plane can work just as well if you’re willing to invest the time into getting it well tuned, and accept that it may be harder to accurately adjust and keep tuned

    I doubt anything Stanley is a bad plane, so a “just ok” plane can be made to sing

    Enjoy it

    The model is a 12-960.
    Thanks Eric I don’t know much using or sharpening a plane. I guess it should be on Workshop Goal list for 2017.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #603760

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    There is plenty of material out there about truing and sharpening hand planes. That aspect seems to separate some makes from the Veritas and Lie-Nielsen which come ready to go out of the box so to speak. If that’s a new subject for you, I would encourage you to dive into that. Stanley block planes have been an industry standard. Have fun making shavings.

    @pi_woodworker Thank you, Ok do you of any names of material about true and sharpening.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #603771

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Nice plane Greg, I too have kept my eyes open at fleas and yard sales but everyone likes to price them according to weight and the going price of gold.

    @jimdaddyo posted up a couple of links to maintaining/sharpening a plane, I thought I had saved them but can’t seem to find them right now.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #603777

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Nice plane Greg, I too have kept my eyes open at fleas and yard sales but everyone likes to price them according to weight and the going price of gold.

    @jimdaddyo posted up a couple of links to maintaining/sharpening a plane, I thought I had saved them but can’t seem to find them right now.

    Thanks Frank. Yes I have to agree people seem to over price them.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #603780

    PI_Woodworker wrote:
    There is plenty of material out there about truing and sharpening hand planes. That aspect seems to separate some makes from the Veritas and Lie-Nielsen which come ready to go out of the box so to speak. If that’s a new subject for you, I would encourage you to dive into that. Stanley block planes have been an industry standard. Have fun making shavings.

    @pi_woodworker Thank you, Ok do you of any names of material about true and sharpening.

    Try this link at FineWoodworking.com: http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/06/02/how-to-tune-up-a-block-plane

    #603790

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    My wife didn’t know what to buy me for our anniversary. So she gave me a gift card for Amazon. She told me to buy a tool that would I like to have

    Nice. If you keep it 30 years it will then be an old plane. My motto I am buying tomorrow’s antiques today.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #603816

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Congrats on pulling the trigger, Greg. Stanley is really the industry standard in planes. It will do you well for many years.

    Paul Sellers has some good instructional videos on tuning planes as well

    Chris Scwarz has another

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #603823

    PI_Woodworker wrote:
    There is plenty of material out there about truing and sharpening hand planes. That aspect seems to separate some makes from the Veritas and Lie-Nielsen which come ready to go out of the box so to speak. If that’s a new subject for you, I would encourage you to dive into that. Stanley block planes have been an industry standard. Have fun making shavings.

    @pi_woodworker Thank you, Ok do you of any names of material about true and sharpening.

    Try this link at FineWoodworking.com: http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/06/02/how-to-tune-up-a-block-plane

    That is a pretty good video, short and accurate.

    I do the flattening on the body up to 400 grt. That is just personal preference. I have seen some guys go right up to buffing them on a wheel to make them look like a mirror.

    I sharpen to 25 degrees (and there is a caveat). I do this with almost all my planes except my #5 (my fore plane) which I do at 30.

    Now for the long winded caveat:

    There are 2 ways that blades are mounted. Bevel up (sometimes called low angle planes) and bevel down. All my bench planes are bevel down. The bed angle is the angle the blade meets the wood. It is different for bevel up planes, which is typical of most block planes.

    Let’s use a typical bed angle of 12 degrees on a bevel up plane as an example.

    If you sharpen at 25 degrees, the total angle will be 37 degrees (12 + 25). Great for end grain as it slices through nicely.

    If at 35 degrees you get 47 in total, pretty close to what a bevel down is, great for general use on most wood.

    If you sharpen at 40 degrees you get 52 total, close to what they call a “York pitch” (50 degrees) and that works best on highly figured wood that is prone to tear out.

    So, now you know you need more planes…welcome to life down the rabbit hole.

    For a plane I just got, I sharpen the primary bevel starting with an old oil stone I got years ago, just a hardware store oil stone. I am not sure of the grit, but it is a double sided one with a course and a “medium” side. I use it to get it started and set the primary angle. Then I switch to the water stone. Again I have a double sided one with 1000 grit and 4000 grit. I use a Veritas Mk ll guide to hold the angle. The last few swipes of the 4000 I crank in another 1 degree for a micro bevel, easy to do on the Mk ll. Make sure you clean off the swarf between grits so you don’t introduce a coarser grit into the next grit. Then I use a strop freehand. After that, most of my sharpening is usually just free hand on the strop, sometimes needing to go to the 4000 grit if I waited too long. I rarely use the guide after I have the blade angle where I want it, but I do use it now and then to get everything back to where I want it after lots of use and several touch ups.

    I have a granite tile that I spray glue some 220 or so wet/dry sandpaper to. I run water over it and use that to flatten my stones.

    Don’t get all hung up about not feeling a burr as you sharpen, sometimes they fall off and you can’t feel them. Use the marker trick shown in the video, and as long as you are getting to the business edge of the blade, you are doing fine. Practice is the best instructor.

    I have a thin piece of 1/4″ wood I put in the vice and take a pass with each side of the blade to see if it is square in the plane. Even shavings on both sides and you are good to go.

    I bought the basic cabinet makers sharpening set from Lee Valley which is the Mk ll and the stone. I got the 2″ wide stone and wish I would have got the wider one. Sharpening methods are as various as there are people. Some use “scary sharp” which is sandpaper spray glued to float glass (or in my case, the granite tile). That is how I started. A cheap way to get into it, not so cheap long term. Some folks like diamond plates, some oil stones, some water stones. Some are very particular about what stones to use, and that is a whole other rabbit hole. My water stones are not the greatest, but they get the job done and were not that expensive. Sure, I could upgrade, but then I am throwing out a perfectly usable stone that I paid money for, and I hate throwing away money. Maybe in 15 years when I wear out what I have. All you need is something that will take away metal and make the blade sharp, and I have that.

    The strop is something I recently started doing and it is a game changer for me. I made an experimental one with an old piece of belt glued to a block of wood and use a buffing compound on it. I have seen buffing compound on plain wood work, and just leather with no compound work too. I believe the green bars of aluminium oxide is probably the best, but it was not available locally so I just picked up some liquid compound used to buff gel coat on fibreglass boats. You can use swirl remover for paint or any other variety to get your feet wet. Strop both sides of the blade.

    Just for kicks, here is a pic of one of my block plane blades in the Mk ll. Everyone likes photos, right?

    Attachments:

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #603864

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I don’t know if I have missed it but @jimdaddyo would you happen to have a video of you using the leather strop?

    #603891

    I don’t know if I have missed it but @jimdaddyo would you happen to have a video of you using the leather strop?

    Yes…it’s a long video of bringing a ’50’s Record #4 back. The strop is at about 51 minute mark if you don’t want to go through the whole thing. I went through the whole process in detail.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #603906

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    My wife didn’t know what to buy me for our anniversary. So she gave me a gift card for Amazon. She told me to buy a tool that would I like to have

    Nice. If you keep it 30 years it will then be an old plane. My motto I am buying tomorrow’s antiques today.

    I like your thinking. I guess that’s what I doing then buying tomorrows antiques.

    Congrats on pulling the trigger, Greg. Stanley is really the industry standard in planes. It will do you well for many years.

    Paul Sellers has some good instructional videos on tuning planes as well

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/vvTcReENk9g?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    Chris Scwarz has another

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/WAYcwubAO2E?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    Thank you for the videos I will check them out. I have wanted a block plane for awhile. But keep holding off on buying one.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #604002

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Can always count on @jimdaddyo for great info on plane maintenance and usage.
    Once again Jim great information. Thank you.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #604011

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Can always count on @jimdaddyo for great info on plane maintenance and usage.
    Once again Jim great information. Thank you.

    Yes thanks Jim.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #604035

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I don’t know if I have missed it but @jimdaddyo would you happen to have a video of you using the leather strop?

    Yes…it’s a long video of bringing a ’50’s Record #4 back. The strop is at about 51 minute mark if you don’t want to go through the whole thing. I went through the whole process in detail.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/j5BE_KzdGUY?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    thanks for that, now another quick question, are you using the rougher side or the shinny side of the leather?

    #604053

    I don’t know if I have missed it but @jimdaddyo would you happen to have a video of you using the leather strop?

    Yes…it’s a long video of bringing a ’50’s Record #4 back. The strop is at about 51 minute mark if you don’t want to go through the whole thing. I went through the whole process in detail.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/j5BE_KzdGUY?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    thanks for that, now another quick question, are you using the rougher side or the shinny side of the leather?

    I have the rough side contacting the iron. I don’t think there is a whole lot of difference though other than the rough side takes a charge of compound slightly better.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

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