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New reciprocating saw features

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  • #733409
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I have been looking at buying a new reciprocating saw, but several things have kept me waiting for a new version.

    First, I can’t decide between a corded or cordless. I have a corded saw by Porter Cable (before PC was destroyed by SBD) that still working good. I have three other one handed reciprocating saws (M18 FUEL, Bosch, Ridgid) and I use the M18 for lighter duty work.

    Cordless seem to be more convenient, but then I am tied to a battery platform as part of the decision making process, in addition, it seems many of the newer features are happening to the corded versions, so may be it’s worth to wait till they become more common place on the cordless.

    For the most part, tool free blade change, pivotal shoe, variable speed control, orbital action, and better vibration control seems to be fairly standard features on most saws now, but there are some unique features I saw that’s very interesting. Here are three saws that intrigued me.

    (1) Dewalt has both the corded and cordless adopting it’s newer four position blade clamp. Basically you can rotate the direction of the blade in four positions, up-down-left-right.

    Not sure if this is that useful. I can see up vs down being useful, and may be less work then rejecting and turning around a blade, not sure about the horizontal positions. They said it allows flush cuts, not entirely clear to me how, I think you still need a longer flexible blade. As far as I know many manufacturers are providing some way to make it easier to allow some flexibility in how the user positions his/her hands. Some do it via rotating handles, some do it via rotating the actual saw body, some do it via rotating a rotating blade clamp, and Bosch do it via a different handle allow “multi-grip”.

    (2) Milwaukee Supersaw 6523-21 – this one has a bunch of good features. Here is a summary.

    (a) Provides for the handle to rotate 360 degrees into 8 positions – all the 90 and 45 degrees. What’s also interesting is the handle and body are independent, so you can rotate over and over and over without worrying about wires and conductors inside getting twisted as you turn in the same direction. This is only available in the corded version.

    (b) Adjustable shoe – now most shoes are pivotal but this one has an additional flexibility to lengthen and shorten the actual shoe. Not sure how useful it really is except in saving blades because you can extend the shoe a bit longer so a blade worn at one spot may have extended life when cutting at a different spot.

    (c) Even this one is corded, the cord is removable at the tail of the tool, this makes it easier to store. Furthermore, if the handle and the other half of the body are truly “independent”, I can see it’s possible to disengage the saw into two pieces, just like some of the quasi chainsaw/pole saw that you can take apart. A full size recip. saw that can be disengaged in the middle into two pieces would make it easier to store in standard size tool boxes. Right now you have to toss it into a very deep box sitting at an angle.

    (d) Variable speed control X 2 – so it has a variable speed dial AND variable speed control at the trigger. The dial is sort of setting the speed limit, then the trigger provides additional control within that set limit. Useful? May be. I think most of the time I would set it to high and use the trigger to control speed, but may be on starting a cut I may tone the dial down?

    Here is a video.

    (3) WORX WX550L – now this is more a light duty toy and I probably won’t ever buy this brand but the features of this 2 year old saw are quite nice. I hope some other “pro” brand would copy it but so far no one has.

    (a) It can switch between being a one handed sawzall or jigsaw by pivoting the head to horizontal and vertical.

    (b) It has orbital control, and a dust blower.

    (c) It takes both jigsaw blades and recip saw blades.

    While I am not into these Frankenstein design, but this one does have some good ideas I hope can be integrated by some of the “big boys”.

    In addition, and I never realized this before, there are many accessory “blades” available for both recip. saws and jigsaws that’s not for cutting. Did you know that?

    (i) Reciprocating saw percussion massage heads

    (ii) Jigsaw massage heads

    (iii) This thing below is called a “SEXSALL” LOL and can be attached to any recip. saw.

    This one is called a SHAGSALL.

    and there are soft rubberly “sleeves” you can fit over these. Use your imagination hahahaha. I bet ORBITAL is good for this application huh?

    #733420
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I have been looking at buying a new reciprocating saw, but several things have kept me waiting for a new version.

    First, I can’t decide between a corded or cordless. I have a corded saw by Porter Cable (before PC was destroyed by SBD) that still working good. I have three other one handed reciprocating saws (M18 FUEL, Bosch, Ridgid) and I use the M18 for lighter duty work.

    Cordless seem to be more convenient, but then I am tied to a battery platform as part of the decision making process, in addition, it seems many of the newer features are happening to the corded versions, so may be it’s worth to wait till they become more common place on the cordless.

    For the most part, tool free blade change, pivotal shoe, variable speed control, orbital action, and better vibration control seems to be fairly standard features on most saws now, but there are some unique features I saw that’s very interesting. Here are three saws that intrigued me.

    (1) Dewalt has both the corded and cordless adopting it’s newer four position blade clamp. Basically you can rotate the direction of the blade in four positions, up-down-left-right.

    Not sure if this is that useful. I can see up vs down being useful, and may be less work then rejecting and turning around a blade, not sure about the horizontal positions. They said it allows flush cuts, not entirely clear to me how, I think you still need a longer flexible blade. As far as I know many manufacturers are providing some way to make it easier to allow some flexibility in how the user positions his/her hands. Some do it via rotating handles, some do it via rotating the actual saw body, some do it via rotating a rotating blade clamp, and Bosch do it via a different handle allow “multi-grip”.

    (2) Milwaukee Supersaw 6523-21 – this one has a bunch of good features. Here is a summary.

    (a) Provides for the handle to rotate 360 degrees into 8 positions – all the 90 and 45 degrees. What’s also interesting is the handle and body are independent, so you can rotate over and over and over without worrying about wires and conductors inside getting twisted as you turn in the same direction. This is only available in the corded version.

    (b) Adjustable shoe – now most shoes are pivotal but this one has an additional flexibility to lengthen and shorten the actual shoe. Not sure how useful it really is except in saving blades because you can extend the shoe a bit longer so a blade worn at one spot may have extended life when cutting at a different spot.

    (c) Even this one is corded, the cord is removable at the tail of the tool, this makes it easier to store. Furthermore, if the handle and the other half of the body are truly “independent”, I can see it’s possible to disengage the saw into two pieces, just like some of the quasi chainsaw/pole saw that you can take apart. A full size recip. saw that can be disengaged in the middle into two pieces would make it easier to store in standard size tool boxes. Right now you have to toss it into a very deep box sitting at an angle.

    (d) Variable speed control X 2 – so it has a variable speed dial AND variable speed control at the trigger. The dial is sort of setting the speed limit, then the trigger provides additional control within that set limit. Useful? May be. I think most of the time I would set it to high and use the trigger to control speed, but may be on starting a cut I may tone the dial down?

    Here is a video.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe title=”Milwaukee 360° Rotating Handle Orbital Super Sawzall Recip Saw – 6523-21″ width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/BmODKzAtIuA?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    (3) WORX WX550L – now this is more a light duty toy and I probably won’t ever buy this brand but the features of this 2 year old saw are quite nice. I hope some other “pro” brand would copy it but so far no one has.

    (a) It can switch between being a one handed sawzall or jigsaw by pivoting the head to horizontal and vertical.

    (b) It has orbital control, and a dust blower.

    (c) It takes both jigsaw blades and recip saw blades.

    While I am not into these Frankenstein design, but this one does have some good ideas I hope can be integrated by some of the “big boys”.

    In addition, and I never realized this before, there are many accessory “blades” available for both recip. saws and jigsaws that’s not for cutting. Did you know that?

    (i) Reciprocating saw percussion massage heads

    (ii) Jigsaw massage heads

    (iii) This thing below is called a “SEXSALL” LOL and can be attached to any recip. saw.

    This one is called a SHAGSALL.

    and there are soft rubberly “sleeves” you can fit over these. Use your imagination hahahaha. I bet ORBITAL is good for this application huh?

    Are those massage heads for real or are you joking?

    #733444
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida
    #733451
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Milwaukee used to make a sawzall that switched from one to two-handed. I don’t think it ever really caught on.

    I have the 15A Milwaukee corded. It’s very nice. It doesn’t have the rotating handle, but honestly, I’ve never needed it.

    I’ve also never needed a blade to be set at an angle. And I do almost exclusively remodel.

    I have a Milwaukee M28 cordless also. It’s extremely powerful. I haven’t tried some of the very new stuff, but it’s the most powerful cordless I’ve ever used.

    I have an older Milwaukee corded, I think a 6.5 Amp. That one doesn’t get much use. It has a blade clamp that you need an allen wrench for. :blink: Pain in the ass.

    I have a dually flatbed, with multitudes of tools boxes, and a 14″ cargo trailer, so I’ve never really had an issue where I needed to break down a sawzall into a smaller package. I carry a corded and cordless on the truck.

    #733452
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    As far as the other stuff, :no: no thanks.

    Friend of mine who is a nurse had a patient, who had a homemade version of one of those used on her.:eek:

    This is a professional forum, so I’ll leave it at that.

    The power tools should stay in the construction field.

    #733456
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I used to swear by the Makita 15 amp corded. For many years that was all we used, after trying all the rest. 18 months ago, I bought the Dewalt 60v recip, and it is life changing. I added a couple more, and we have not used the corded ones since. Prior to this, the other cordless were always underpowered.

    #733466
    Doobie
    Moderator

    First, I can’t decide between a corded or cordless. I have a corded saw by Porter Cable (before PC was destroyed by SBD) that still working good.

    I have an old corded PC that is 20 or so years old or so that still works fine. But since I bought the Bosch bigger and smaller ergo shaped models a couple of years ago, it never gets used.

    Yesterday I used the larger model to cut apart some buried 6x6s and it had plenty of power for the job. The blade change on it is a bit finicky, but at least it’s tool-less. The vibration control does make a diff compared to my old PC which is a plus.

    Innovations are nice, just sometimes what is dubbed an innovation is maybe just a gimmick.

    #733536
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I have an old corded PC that is 20 or so years old or so that still works fine. But since I bought the Bosch bigger and smaller ergo shaped models a couple of years ago, it never gets used.

    Occasionally I would use the smaller one handed hackzall. I use the M18 FUEL version and it’s OK for light duty work. I have the Bosch one tool which I redeemed but it doesn’t perform as well as the M18 so I gave that to my neighbor, but then he gave it back to me after a month LOL. A few weeks ago I tried to use the one handed saw to cut a 1.5″ diameter tree root and it took at least 30 seconds. With my old corded PC it took like 5 seconds. Huge difference. I do need a full size cordless sawzall but I kept thinking they will have a newer, smaller, lighter one with a long stroke length soon.

    #733546
    CB
    Spectator

    Recip Manifesto:

    1. Forget the gimmicks

    2. Cordless brings MEANINGFUL utility, speed, safety, efficiency, balance, control, time savings, and other intangibles over corded, especially in what amounts to be often a key tool in demolition work.

    3. Anti Vibration will be greatly appreciated by your forearms, and in the overall ease of your work. I have found that older, less featured, made in the USA before TTI took over Milwaukee Sawzalls in around the 10 amp size (corded) to be butter smooth. I’ll use that one for cutting pipes if I have it along, especially if I intend to refit the ends of those pipes later. It isn’t just blade selection… it is the smoothness of the reciprocation that I have found to be beneficial.. and yes I have the fancy full featured super orbital big 15 amp Milwaukee (Made in China).

    4. For some tasks, less power means more control, which means more finesse can be teased out of delicate material cuts. Very thin aluminum, brittle plastics, random things that need a solution that involves cutting, but the cuts are long and the time is short so doing it by hand is not gonna “cut it” pa dum pum. I used to run two 9.6V Makita recips and two 9.6v Makita jigs, with a metal blade in one, and a wood blade in the other. Anemic little things for certain, but that anemia was just the ticket sometimes to getting something done faster that was best done by hand, but that would be ruined immediately with a more powerful, heavier, larger, more awkward to control full size recip.

    5. Stroke length. A corollary to speed on one hand, and control on the other. One of the reasons why I recently bought a the black Makita sub compact recip, with a body that fits entirely within the 14.4″ open space of stud bay, wasn’t just the short body length… it was the short stroke. Not always needed, but occasionally, it is useful in a tight spot where you don’t want the outstroke of the blade to poke through something, and other circumstances confound resolution by just selective blade length alone.

    6. Blade change collet… enabling blade changes with ease, access, and speed. You want to be able to change blades quickly without any tools and without having to reposition the foot and without any additional bs. This makes it even easier to use the right blade for the task, because the blade can be changed instantly. All those four angle gimmicks shown in the original post I know nothing about, so I can’t speak to them. Let’s not forget… we can always flip the saw, and that is faster than any blade change. Only when the handle structure interferes in an upward flush cut will I flip the blade upside down in the collet. This is possible with almost every collet made today, but back in the 70’s this wasn’t possible universally, and I think it was Milwaukee who first blew the industry away with the a tool free collet that could mount the blade both ways. That’s good enough for most of the guys I know who run recips in demo work day in and day out. I guess I shouldn’t discount innovation… but the question returns to: with all those options to mount the blade this way and that, how easy and how quick is it to just change the damn blade?

    Ultimately, you may decide on having two or three recips on hand… a big heavy corded high amp long stroke orbital action monster, combined with an all around cordless in the battery system you run, and perhaps a small short handle short stroke with less power for delicate control. If you could only have one, then the all around cordless in the middle can be pushed into the heavy territory, and pulled into the light territory of tasks.

    I do have my share of recip gimmicks… nothing naughty… just a wire brush and a metal file attachment kit. Saves a lot of time and tedium.

    #733561
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    2. Cordless brings MEANINGFUL utility, speed, safety, efficiency, balance, control, time savings, and other intangibles over corded, especially in what amounts to be often a key tool in demolition work.I do have my share of recip gimmicks… just a wire brush and a metal file attachment kit. Saves a lot of time and tedium.

    My recip gimmicks is an attachment to for spray cans to mix paint. A lot easier than shaking.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #733571
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    When you’re up a ladder, not fighting with a cord would be nice.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #733581
    Doobie
    Moderator

    2. Cordless brings MEANINGFUL utility, speed, safety, efficiency, balance, control, time savings, and other intangibles over corded, especially in what amounts to be often a key tool in demolition work.I do have my share of recip gimmicks… just a wire brush and a metal file attachment kit. Saves a lot of time and tedium.

    My recip gimmicks is an attachment to for spray cans to mix paint. A lot easier than shaking.

    Can you show what you have for the Bill?



    @theamcguy

    #733587

    When you’re up a ladder, not fighting with a cord would be nice.

    Most definitely a huge advantage of cordless tools.

    #733634
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Can you show what you have for the Bill?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #733651
    Doobie
    Moderator

    That’s a neat little accessory Bill. And not ridiculously priced at $25 USD, except for international shipments they add $20 min to ship to Canada, which then becomes at least around $70 CAD after our exchange on our dollar, never mind potentially getting dinged at the door with cross border shipment brokerage fees, which is just way too much for how much I would need it.

    https://www.mixkwik.com/

    I found it on Amazon.ca by some 3rd party seller….$121… No way!

    https://www.amazon.ca/MixKwik-Tool-by/dp/B01LXYTGC4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=26CE7H920MS55&keywords=mixkwik&qid=1570451045&sprefix=Mixkwi%2Caps%2C349&sr=8-1

    I had actually thought it was some kind of gizmo when you mentioned it that was for gallon cans and such. That would be way more handy for my needs.

    #733654

    Haha yeah I remember that , it’s been talked about here before
    I think I’ll try to make one today if I have some spare time
    I’ll try to post up later today.

    Done two of them , few little things left , file and bolt a old recip blade to it and some rubber and a strap or two.

    #733658
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Haha yeah I remember that , it’s been talked about here before
    I think I’ll try to make one today if I have some spare time
    I’ll try to post up later today.

    I just don’t have enough of a need to make one myself, nor the time. But I have thought and looked at different times how to make one for gallon cans. Just never found a DIY one I liked. Real paint can mixers are pricey.

    #733659

    Haha yeah I remember that , it’s been talked about here before
    I think I’ll try to make one today if I have some spare time
    I’ll try to post up later today.

    I just don’t have enough of a need to make one myself, nor the time. But I have thought and looked at different times how to make one for gallon cans. Just never found a DIY one I liked. Real paint can mixers are pricey.

    I won’t use it very regularly , but I have time and the material to make it , so at least I’ll have one for use when I actually do need it
    I definitely won’t pay that for one , unless like the guy using it daily , then yeah I could easily justify the cost.

    #733682
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Haha yeah I remember that , it’s been talked about here before
    I think I’ll try to make one today if I have some spare time
    I’ll try to post up later today.

    Done two of them , few little things left , file and bolt a old recip blade to it and some rubber and a strap or two.

    It nice when you have the stuff to work with to make theses. That way they don’t cost as much. Nice work Brian.
    I was just wondering why you couldn’t use a water bottle holder for a bike to hold the can. I saw at the $ store.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #733695
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I don’t think I’d run out to buy the recip saw the Op posted up.. I just don’t need that kind of gimmick for the recip saw to work for me.

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