dcsimg

New Bosch OSC114C Oscillating Multi-Tool Carbide Blade Review

This topic contains 102 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  Nyx 4 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 103 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #29236

    bethepro
    Keymaster
    Mt Prospect, IL

    Bosch is manufacturing a new carbide OMT blade and we wanted to give a select group of product testers the opportunity to review the blades and share their thoughts.

    We also gave them the challenge of cutting non-traditional materials with the blade to test the strength of the carbide blade. Bosch ran their own tests with the carbide blade and it was able to make more than 30 cuts in 1/2″ rebar.

    Our product testers will post their reviews (and pictures of what they tried to cut with the blade) throughout the week. Be sure to check back to see what they had to say and feel free to ask them any questions about the blade’s performance.

    Aaron

    Email us at bethepro@bethepro.com

    #29352

    woodman_412
    Moderator

    After I received the new carbide tooth OMT blades from Bosch I put them to work in a variety of materials. I was very impressed with their performance in every material that I tried to cut. The new carbide teeth add a tremendous amount of durability to the blade and by far surpass all other OMT blades that I’ve used.

    I tested the blades in a variety of materials which include: hardwood, screws, nails, 1/8″ steel, Corian, Staron and porcelain enamel coated steel. The blades handled hardwood with no trouble at all. They didn’t cut quite as quickly as a Japanese tooth blade but they weren’t far behind. The cut was smooth and controlled and left a good finish. Cutting nails and screws was no problem at all. I cut through wood screws and galvanized nails quickly and with no loss of sharpness of the teeth. The carbide blades handled 1/8″ steel with no issues. I made cuts in steel angle and I was very impressed with how the blades held up and the speed of cut. I found that the carbide blades cut through metal quicker than standard metal cutting blades. I also made some cuts in Corian which went very well. The blades had no problem cutting through it and were very durable.

    To test the blades in more non-traditional materials that I wouldn’t usually cut with an OMT I tried Staron and an old bathtub. Staron is a solid surface material that is similar to Corian but a little bit different. The carbide blade worked very well in the Staron and cut quickly and did not damage the blade at all. I think these blades make an excellent choice for cutting solid surface materials because of their durability. For my test of cutting porcelain enamel coated steel I made some cuts in an old bathtub that I had sitting behind the shed. I was very impressed with how the blade cut and how well the teeth held up to the task. I could tell by the speed of cut that the bathtub was a more difficult material to cut than the 1/8″ steel angle. Even so, the blade performed very well. I have included a couple of photos of me cutting the bathtub and the Staron.

    I found that the width and length of the blades was very well suited to all the tasks that I used them for. For my applications I wouldn’t need a blade that is any longer or wider. I find that in general longer and wider blades are harder to control so I think these carbide tooth blades are an ideal size. Based on the performance of these blades I would say that they could replace a reciprocating saw or portable band saw for making cuts in tight spaces where the bigger saws won’t fit.

    After making all of my test cuts I examined the teeth under 15X magnification to see how the actual cutting edges held up under the stress. I was amazed to see that the tips of the teeth had not been dulled by all the cutting I did. One thing I did notice though under magnification is that some of the teeth had small pieces broken off. This wasn’t surprising since carbide is harder and more brittle than steel so while it holds its edge very well it is more prone to fractures the same as any carbide tipped blade. There was no decrease in performance though from the small fractures that had occurred. The other observation that I made while using the blades is that due to the carbide blades being slightly heavier than a standard blade, there was slightly more vibration in the tool when it was running. It certainly wasn’t enough to cause any problems or be uncomfortable but I did notice the difference.

    Bosch has done an excellent job with these new carbide OMT blades. They allow you to cut difficult materials without worrying about dulling the teeth like a standard OMT blade. They will definitely be my go-to blades for tough applications since they inspire confidence and I know they will hold up.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #29355

    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    Hello all, this is my review of the Bosch OSC114C OMT Carbide Teeth Blade. First I want to thank BeThePro and Bosch for the opportunity to test out their products and to be able to provide feedback about them.

    I received the OMT blade in Bosch’s standard packaging which informs the user that these blades are specifically designed to cut various types of metal material. Although these blades can be used to cut wood and wood with nails like some of their other blades are designed for, this blade was built to take on metal specifically. The blade was easy to install into my Dremel OMT with an adapter. If you will reference the pictures below you will see that I have setup a test block of wood with various sizes of random screws I had laying around. I also had a padlock I wanted to try this on. My thought was that if I wanted to cut these materials I might use a grinding tool such as a small dremel with a grinding disk or a larger grinder such as one that would be used to cut rebar. I might also use a recip saw fit with a metal cutting blade. The pre-req’s specified the possiblity of using this OMT blade instead of a recip metal blade and I wanted to see how it would do.

    I fired up the OMT and went at the first screw. My initial thoughts were this blade has to hold up because that’s what it’s designed to do and this isnt a very demanding test on a metal cutting blade cutting a metal screw. It cut through the first screw without issues. After the first one I realized that this thing was going to cut all my materials with variations in only how long it will take to make the actual cut. One by one I went through each screw and then finally to the padlock. I wouldn’t have taken a recip saw to a padlock so this was my “non-traditional” material test and really quite practical.

    A few things I noticed about my test as things progressed. My tool started to heat up and since there was a good amount of vibration I was holding onto the tool firmly. Since it’s a small tool that meant I was sometimes covering part or all of the vents on the OMT preventing it from cooling properly. If I had a recip saw in my hand there would be plenty of tool to hold onto without interfering with the cooling mechanism. Another thing was that even though the blade itself seemed to heat up, it didn’t leave burn marks on the wooden test piece. I didn’t have any crazy material around like Dan’s bathtub to test this on but after seeing how well the blade did on these pieces I don’t have doubts about its performance.

    I took a picture before and after the blade and with 0 magnification I couldn’t tell much of a difference in the blade that indicated it took a beating. Some general cosmetic wear is shown and a few scratches from half cut screws are visible but the teeth look to be in great shape after the test.

    Overall, I am very happy with the performance of the blade and think it will be an excellent addition to anyone’s OMT blade arsenal. In additional to the above review I will briefly address the specific questions below:

    • Do you think these blades could replace a reciprocating saw blade or band saw blade to cut pipes and screws in small spaces? Yes, the Bosch Carbide blade performed very well in comparision to a metal recip blade.
    • What specifically did you cut (i.e. hardwoods, nails and screws, stainless steel bolts, cast iron pipe, galvanized steel pipe, plaster and lathe, cement board, fiber board, sheet metal, wall, tile, other) with this carbide blade and how did it compare (in terms of speed, strength, versatility, etc.) to other OMT blades and even non-OMT blades/saws? I cut various sized steel screws and lag screws ranging from 1/8 inch to ½ inch as well as a padlock.
    • Do you have the need for a wider blade? How wide? What applications would you use a wider blade for? I don’t see the need for a wider blade given this is a blade for an OMT, if I needed a wider blade for something so large I might be more inclined to use a recip saw anyway.
    • Do you have the need for a longer blade? How long? What applications would you use a longer blade for? I think the blade length was just fine on this product, it’s just enough for a plunge cut and yet short enough to keep under control.

    #29361

    Anonymous

    Very impressive, Really detailed reviews from both of you guys. Thanks for the pics too.

    #29369

    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    Thanks Boyd.

    #29373

    redwood
    Pro

    That is impressive, especially the hardened steel of a padlock.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #29378

    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    Mark, i thought the same thats why i was interested to give it a try. Half way through the cut i felt like the blade could have been like “uh really? is this all you got?”

    #29387

    joesainz
    Keymaster
    Chicago, IL

    Love the feedback guys – I can’t wait to hear from the rest. I’ve definitely put the blade through some tests, and it is awesome.

    #29508

    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    They really are a great blade, I am working on my review now, wait till you see what I cut with it.

    #29513

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i recieved my blades a couple weeks ago.. but actually havent had a chance to do any tests on them.. ill try to this weekend on a commercial millwork install im doing outside of the topsail boat, as a subcontractor under my new company title “TrimCats Carpentry”

    however ill anwer some of hte other questions right now

    Do you think these blades could replace a reciprocating saw blade or band saw blade to cut pipes and screws in small spaces? they definitely have there place in the blade case.. theres times when a recip is just too aggressive for tight quarters

    • Do you have the need for a wider blade? How wide? What applications would you use a wider blade for? thats kinda tough to answer.. i think a wider blade wooiuld heat up too quick for it being made of thinnner metal and it would put more strain on the tool because of larger cutting area,. since oscilators are a lower amperage tool the motor could take abuse from such a thing

    • Do you have the need for a longer blade? How long? What applications would you use a longer blade for? these blades are about the same length as most blades. i have run into situations where ive needed a longer blade but didnt have one.. ive had to make relief cuts in the material to remove stock so i could get the blade in deeper to complete the cut.. making a blade thats 1″ longer than the current ones wouldnt be a bad idea

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #29514

    redwood
    Pro

    I had a chance today to try out the new OSC114C blade. It was impressive in the wide range of materials it would cut.

    Rebar: I cut a piece of #4 rebar (1/2″) with my Bosch multi oscilating tool and it did OK. I figured I would time it against a recip saw. It wasn’t a fair contest. The recip saw took 8 seconds and the oscillator 21 seconds. Despite that, there would be times the multi tool would be much easier to use.

    Fiber cement: I cut a square out of a piece of Hardi plank to simulate cutting out for a electrical box. It worked flawlessly and was probably a lot quicker then using a jig saw with a special blade. We do a fair amount of fiber cement siding jobs and this blade would really come in handy.

    Azek PVC trim: For kicks I tried the blade on a piece of Azek. Yes it made the cutout, but probably not as well as a jigsaw. It tended to melt the Azek, as it cut it.

    Joist hanger nail: The new blade worked great cutting off a .148″ JH nail. I suspect that a recip saw would be cleaner, but not as accurate or able to cut the nail perfectly flush with the surface of the wood.

    Ipe hardwood decking: This was a failure. I was not able to plunge cut into a piece of 1″ ipe. It smoked like crazy and I gave up. Thinking that maybe the blade was worn out by that time, I used another new blade. Unfortunatly the result was the same. I then tried another bosch blade designed for hardwoods. It to smoked a little, but was able to make the cut. Both blades performed much better when cutting into the edge grain, such as for a notch.

    Here are some pics.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #29519

    redwood
    Pro

    Here are a couple more pics into the hardwood and cutting the JH nail.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #29524

    redwood
    Pro

    Here is the blade specific for hardwoods.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #29534

    Anonymous

    Great review Mark, I see when you said it smoked in the hardwood you weren’t kidding, Wow. I was amazed to see it cut through a padlock too, Especially a Master Lock, I always thought those were really tough. I’ve had to cut a few with bolt cutters and it wasn’t easy. Thanks for the pics.

    #29572

    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I’m very impressed that the blade cut through the lock. I never even thought of trying it but I would have figured that it wouldn’t go through. Might not be something that should be advertised though…might make things easier for thieves 🙂

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #29593

    Hey guys, it is past time for me to give my review of the Bosch OSC114C OMT Carbide Teeth Blade. Thanks again to BTP and Bosch for the chance to test out this sweet new blade (and the patience in my posting this review!)

    I used this blade with my Bosch MX30 OMT. Which is one sweet tool if you are in the market for a new OMT. Tool-less blade change is the way to be.

    Now, I have to admit that sometimes I am skeptical about tools that claim to excel in multiple tasks that previously required different tools or blades, but I would tend to agree with the other reviewers thus far: for places a recip blade can’t fit or is unhelpful, this blade can potentially replace the need for one. Not sure I would take this blade to a demolition contest, but it can get the job done in a pinch for sure.

    I wasn’t able to test the blade on anything as crazy and exciting as I was hoping to (especially compared to your guys’ ideas with the padlocks, bathtub, etc) – you see, my landlord didn’t seem too thrilled about the idea of me cutting a hunk of metal out of our radiators – hahaha… But I was impressed with the way this blade was able to cut different metals and woods.

    One of the first things I cut was my Husky 5 shelf storage shelving unit. I wanted to trim a little bit from the excess metal on the posts from the top because of a particularly low ceiling in my basement. The blade easily cut off the excess metal on the post and left a decent finish. Since that was an easy task for the blade, and I happened to not use one of the shelves, I decided to cut the slightly thicker beams – and was able to do so again without much sweat.

    I also built a basic shelf in our closet and realized I had done some poor math and the 2×4 supporting the shelf were sticking out a bit on the sides… Long story short, the blade plunge cut cleanly and easily without burn marks and without hesitation.

    My initial thoughts are that I am actually excited about the versatility of this blade. I was not able to put it through the ropes in terms of testing its breaking/dulling point, but I would highly recommend this blade for any time you need to cut really tough material in a tough spot and/or if you cut a wide array of materials and would be quite happy to have a general blade left on your OMT all of the time. In additional to my thoughts above, I will briefly address the specific questions below:

    • Do you think these blades could replace a reciprocating saw blade or band saw blade to cut pipes and screws in small spaces? Not entirely if speed your #1 concern, but it can absolutely work in a pinch / if there are not 100 cuts.
    • What specifically did you cut (i.e. hardwoods, nails and screws, stainless steel bolts, cast iron pipe, galvanized steel pipe, plaster and lathe, cement board, fiber board, sheet metal, wall, tile, other) with this carbide blade and how did it compare (in terms of speed, strength, versatility, etc.) to other OMT blades and even non-OMT blades/saws? I cut the steel in the Husky shelving and softwood (pine and cedar).
    • Do you have the need for a wider blade? How wide? What applications would you use a wider blade for? I would echo the thoughts of the other guys here. Not sure I want a wider blade on my OMT.
    • Do you have the need for a longer blade? How long? What applications would you use a longer blade for? Not sure I need a longer blade, but perhaps you could package a set of 1/2″, 1″ and 1 1/2″ carbide blades IF the shorter lengths reduced vibration/increased life of blade… Not sure what the other guys think about how helpful shorter blades would be, but I didn’t need the full length when cutting the metal I cut… And you wouldn’t need it for cutting screws, etc… But I imagine the shorter length would not be super helpful cutting certain pipes and other applications.

    John S

    #29609

    Anonymous

    Dan wrote:I’m very impressed that the blade cut through the lock. I never even thought of trying it but I would have figured that it wouldn’t go through. Might not be something that should be advertised though…might make things easier for thieves

    LOL Dan, I thought the same thing but bolt cutters are faster & quieter LOL. Last year I won a pair of Folding handle bolt cutters from Sears. They feel really heavy duty and I thought, Why would anyone need one of these with folding handles? Seems like a perfect pocket tool for thieves LOL.

    #29611

    Anonymous

    John S wrote:Hey guys, it is past time for me to give my review of the Bosch OSC114C OMT Carbide Teeth Blade. Thanks again to BTP and Bosch for the chance to test out this sweet new blade (and the patience in my posting this review!)

    I used this blade with my Bosch MX30 OMT. Which is one sweet tool if you are in the market for a new OMT. Tool-less blade change is the way to be.

    Now, I have to admit that sometimes I am skeptical about tools that claim to excel in multiple tasks that previously required different tools or blades, but I would tend to agree with the other reviewers thus far: for places a recip blade can’t fit or is unhelpful, this blade can potentially replace the need for one. Not sure I would take this blade to a demolition contest, but it can get the job done in a pinch for sure.

    I wasn’t able to test the blade on anything as crazy and exciting as I was hoping to (especially compared to your guys’ ideas with the padlocks, bathtub, etc) – you see, my landlord didn’t seem too thrilled about the idea of me cutting a hunk of metal out of our radiators – hahaha… But I was impressed with the way this blade was able to cut different metals and woods.

    One of the first things I cut was my Husky 5 shelf storage shelving unit. I wanted to trim a little bit from the excess metal on the posts from the top because of a particularly low ceiling in my basement. The blade easily cut off the excess metal on the post and left a decent finish. Since that was an easy task for the blade, and I happened to not use one of the shelves, I decided to cut the slightly thicker beams – and was able to do so again without much sweat.

    I also built a basic shelf in our closet and realized I had done some poor math and the 2×4 supporting the shelf were sticking out a bit on the sides… Long story short, the blade plunge cut cleanly and easily without burn marks and without hesitation.

    My initial thoughts are that I am actually excited about the versatility of this blade. I was not able to put it through the ropes in terms of testing its breaking/dulling point, but I would highly recommend this blade for any time you need to cut really tough material in a tough spot and/or if you cut a wide array of materials and would be quite happy to have a general blade left on your OMT all of the time. In additional to my thoughts above, I will briefly address the specific questions below:

    • Do you think these blades could replace a reciprocating saw blade or band saw blade to cut pipes and screws in small spaces? Not entirely if speed your #1 concern, but it can absolutely work in a pinch / if there are not 100 cuts.
    • What specifically did you cut (i.e. hardwoods, nails and screws, stainless steel bolts, cast iron pipe, galvanized steel pipe, plaster and lathe, cement board, fiber board, sheet metal, wall, tile, other) with this carbide blade and how did it compare (in terms of speed, strength, versatility, etc.) to other OMT blades and even non-OMT blades/saws? I cut the steel in the Husky shelving and softwood (pine and cedar).
    • Do you have the need for a wider blade? How wide? What applications would you use a wider blade for? I would echo the thoughts of the other guys here. Not sure I want a wider blade on my OMT.
    • Do you have the need for a longer blade? How long? What applications would you use a longer blade for? Not sure I need a longer blade, but perhaps you could package a set of 1/2″, 1″ and 1 1/2″ carbide blades IF the shorter lengths reduced vibration/increased life of blade… Not sure what the other guys think about how helpful shorter blades would be, but I didn’t need the full length when cutting the metal I cut… And you wouldn’t need it for cutting screws, etc… But I imagine the shorter length would not be super helpful cutting certain pipes and other applications.

    Nice review John, Thanks. I don’t have an OMT and didn’t really know what all they’re capable of doing. After reading these reviews I feel like I should get one

    #29615

    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    Dan wrote:I’m very impressed that the blade cut through the lock. I never even thought of trying it but I would have figured that it wouldn’t go through. Might not be something that should be advertised though…might make things easier for thieves

    Dan, you serious? Have you ever seen storage wars? Almost before every storage unit they auction off they show someone ripping through a lock with a grinder and a few seconds later you’re in. Locks only offer a certain level of protection, if someone wants past any level of security bad enough they will find a way in. The only protection you can offer a lock is preventing someone from getting to it.

    #29619

    redwood
    Pro

    Dan, you serious? Have you ever seen storage wars? Almost before every storage unit they auction off they show someone ripping through a lock with a grinder and a few seconds later you’re in. Locks only offer a certain level of protection, if someone wants past any level of security bad enough they will find a way in. The only protection you can offer a lock is preventing someone from getting to it.

    That is true Nick, but now you can use the Bosch cordless multi tool to cut that lock off. A little smaller, a little quieter. All less conspicuous.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 103 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 0.602 seconds