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NAIL GUN SAFETY

Viewing 19 posts - 141 through 159 (of 159 total)
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  • #517587
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I remember coming home from buying a refurbed Bostich framing nailer from HD about 15 years ago and trying it for the first time to make sure it worked and also to basically try such a big nailer for the first time. Up until them, I’d only used smaller guns for trim and stapling stuff. This thing was like an elephant compared to the monkees I’d ever used.

    I put two scraps of 2X4 on my workbench and go to use it not realizing that it had the bump firing trigger on it. Three of those 3 1/4in nails are in that board faster than I can blink and the last firing was real close to where my hand was holding down the scraps. Scared the crap out of me.

    After I changed my underwear, first thing I did was swap out the trigger for the sequential one and learned that I didn’t need anywhere near 120 PSI with this beast. I’ve used it lots since that day, and maybe it was a good thing what happened that day. It is etched in my mind to this day that large nailers like this are not toys.

    #517622
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    After I changed my underwear, first thing I did was swap out the trigger for the sequential one and learned that I didn’t need anywhere near 120 PSI with this beast

    A sequential and bump trigger are the same thing. All my guns have them or I wouldn’t own it. They are for pros doing production work. The press the safety down the pull the trigger are new to older carpenters.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #517626
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Here it is,,,
    http://www.aconcordcarpenter.com/nailgun-contact-vs-sequential-trip-triggers.html

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #517633
    Doobie
    Moderator

    After I changed my underwear, first thing I did was swap out the trigger for the sequential one and learned that I didn’t need anywhere near 120 PSI with this beast

    A sequential and bump trigger are the same thing. All my guns have them or I wouldn’t own it. They are for pros doing production work. The press the safety down the pull the trigger are new to older carpenters.

    Semantics aside, you know what I mean. Aaaargh!!!!

    JUST TO CLARIFY. I had a gun I acquired that shot repeatedly if I bumped the nose as I held the trigger.

    I changed the trigger to be like other guns I was used to that required one to engage the trigger each time you wanted to fire.

    NUFF SAID! 🙁

    #517668
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    After I changed my underwear, first thing I did was swap out the trigger for the sequential one and learned that I didn’t need anywhere near 120 PSI with this beast

    A sequential and bump trigger are the same thing. All my guns have them or I wouldn’t own it. They are for pros doing production work. The press the safety down the pull the trigger are new to older carpenters.

    Absolutely they are professional tools and should never be put in the hands of an amateur without some serious operation and safety training. The bump fire feature is one of the reasons they are used by pros.

    I was fortunate enough to get a crash course in framing nailers from the Senco Canada distributor many years ago. He was a customer of mine at the time and wouldn’t consider letting me leave the shop until he knew I was familiar enough with the tool to at least not hurt myself.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #517680
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    All my guns have them or I wouldn’t own it. They are for pros doing production work. The press the safety down the pull the trigger are new to older carpenters.

    I wouldn’t want it any other way either. Power tools are for increasing production, if you have a safety feature that prevents that it is for DIY or HO use.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #518049
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    JUST TO CLARIFY. I had a gun I acquired that shot repeatedly if I bumped the nose as I held the trigger.

    Yup that’s how the all use to work and how this pile all works.

    Attachments:

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #518089
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Yup that’s how the all use to work and how this pile all works.

    Nice collection of nail guns Dirty. I always say power tools are meant to speed production. Besides wouldn’t pulling a trigger all day everyday eventually give you a repetitive injury? Bump firing makes sense.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #518383
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Yup that’s how the all use to work and how this pile all works.

    Nice collection of nail guns Dirty. I always say power tools are meant to speed production. Besides wouldn’t pulling a trigger all day everyday eventually give you a repetitive injury? Bump firing makes sense.

    Yup we bump the gun around as fast as we can.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #518399
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Yup that’s how the all use to work and how this pile all works.

    Nice collection of nail guns Dirty. I always say power tools are meant to speed production. Besides wouldn’t pulling a trigger all day everyday eventually give you a repetitive injury? Bump firing makes sense.

    Yup we bump the gun around as fast as we can.

    I missed that earlier pic you posted. Nice collection there Dirty.

    Any others you’d like to have?

    #717275
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The latest in nailgun safety on this new project is the gun and hose must have a lanyard from the gun to the hose..

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #717290
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The latest in nailgun safety on this new project is the gun and hose must have a lanyard from the gun to the hose..

    Man I guess that is so if you disconnect the gun it will still be attached to the hose. But who doesn’t have the gun in hand when disconnecting the hose?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #717301
    Doobie
    Moderator

    The latest in nailgun safety on this new project is the gun and hose must have a lanyard from the gun to the hose..

    Why? I’m not sure of what safety element it is trying to achieve in requiring that.

    #717302
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The latest in nailgun safety on this new project is the gun and hose must have a lanyard from the gun to the hose..

    Why? I’m not sure of what safety element it is trying to achieve in requiring that.

    I believe it is so that if the hose comes unhooked, it cannot fly off and hit someone causing an injury. It could also startle someone causing them to fall if they are hit by the end of the hose.

    #717305
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The latest in nailgun safety on this new project is the gun and hose must have a lanyard from the gun to the hose..

    Why? I’m not sure of what safety element it is trying to achieve in requiring that.

    I believe it is so that if the hose comes unhooked, it cannot fly off and hit someone causing an injury. It could also startle someone causing them to fall if they are hit by the end of the hose.

    There is a device called an air fuse which is standard on a lot of jobsites using 3/4″ hose running breakers and such. It shuts off the air supply if the hose comes uncoupled or is cut preventing the hose from injuring someone.

    Here is a listing from CP for air fuses in a variety of sizes.
    https://www.cp.com/en/tools/products/accessories/air-line-accessories/air-fuses

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #717327
    CB
    Blocked

    I had air fuses, and safety (air releasing) ball valves, on my old Speedaire portable compressor. Working on sets and stages where there are a lot of scenic artists compressed into a small area, there was an elevated conscientiousness for the safety of others (EVERY tool had to be tethered, down the smallest C wrench).

    But residential, no one cares, and without supervision, it so easy to get lax. Last year I picked up a new Makita 5200 big bore compressor… I’ve done nothing but use it as is… no additional safety valves.

    I use a coil whip on the ground, however, when on a ladder or on a roof, I loop the supply air line to the back of my belt, so that if the line gets moved or pulled by someone downstairs, it will pull the slack loop of through my belt first, before yanking on the nail gun, giving me some reaction time.

    Looping the line through the belt also takes the weight of the 100′ line off of the gun. Much easier to manage a 6′ loop between belt and gun. I’m guessing that the slack/control loop through the belt would mitigate hose whip, but nothing that I have described above is unusual (ie, everyone around here loops the hose through the back of the belt when on a ladder) so if the safety engineers have now determined that lanyards are a minimum standard for safety, I have to assume they found that loops through the belt alone do not solve all of their concerns.

    Thanks for passing that along DWB.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #717330

    JUST TO CLARIFY. I had a gun I acquired that shot repeatedly if I bumped the nose as I held the trigger.

    Yup that’s how the all use to work and how this pile all works.

    That’s some nicely used nailers DWB
    I always use the bump fire mode
    Definitely not the same thing with the older paslode 🤫 battery or cordless with the gas cartridge

    #717343
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The latest in nailgun safety on this new project is the gun and hose must have a lanyard from the gun to the hose..

    Why? I’m not sure of what safety element it is trying to achieve in requiring that.

    I believe it is so that if the hose comes unhooked, it cannot fly off and hit someone causing an injury. It could also startle someone causing them to fall if they are hit by the end of the hose.

    I think the OSHA standard it any tool with 150 PSI or grater needs the lanyard but the Big GC safety bots thought it would be a good idea for us with only 90 to 120 PSI running.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #717366
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I think the OSHA standard it any tool with 150 PSI or grater needs the lanyard but the Big GC safety bots thought it would be a good idea for us with only 90 to 120 PSI running.

    What can you do but comply.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

Viewing 19 posts - 141 through 159 (of 159 total)
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