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Nail gun repair

Viewing 10 posts - 41 through 50 (of 50 total)
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  • #708708
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    That NR83A is one of the best air nailers made. And yours in particular as shown in the photo, is an original, mostly likely made in Japan.

    Ummmmmm that’s not a NR83A
    NR83s are stick nailers. That is a coil nailer NV83A.
    I don’t know why it’s missing the air inlet nipple? I hope they weren’t using it for parts. It’s easy enough to fix. Make sure you put in a god 10 drops of gun oil to make it slippery inside.
    these below are Old school NR83s

    #708890
    CB
    Spectator

    That NR83A is one of the best air nailers made. And yours in particular as shown in the photo, is an original, mostly likely made in Japan.

    Ummmmmm that’s not a NR83A
    NR83s are stick nailers. That is a coil nailer NV83A.

    The main bodies of the NR83A and the NV83A are the same. The same unique cylinder drive valve system. In other words, the business end, where the energy stored in compressed air is converted into mechanical energy to drive the nail is shared between both nail guns, and is what distinguishes this lineage of nail guns from all others. That’s what I was referring to.

    Any differences between coil and strip magazines are obviously self evident, but notice how the air cylinder heads are the same.

    These are good fast acting, reliable nail guns, regardless of whether fitted with a coil or strip load. The same air cylinder is also fitted to an aluminum 34 degree strip magazine, called an NR83AAx, where x is the revision number, now at 5.

    The OP’s has no revision number, so that is why I say it is an original made in Japan, not Taiwan. The photos above are of a revision 4 and revision 3 respectively.

    #708969
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The main bodies of the NR83A and the NV83A are the same. The same unique cylinder drive valve system. In other words, the business end, where the energy stored in compressed air is converted into mechanical energy to drive the nail is shared between both nail guns, and is what distinguishes this lineage of nail guns from all others. That’s what I was referring to.

    Oh ,, thanks for the side by side pics. I never knew that they both shared the same bodies. I just keep learning. Thanks.

    #708997
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    OK, so for the guys that use the Hitachi framers, what brand of nails do you use ? Do you prefer one brand over another ?

    Had a little time today so I pulled the drum off, removed the plate from it and got that all cleaned up. Also sprayed down all the external moving parts and gave them a quick brushing off. They definately need a much better cleaning… lots of dirt stuck to oil all around everything.

    #709004
    CB
    Spectator

    OK, so for the guys that use the Hitachi framers, what brand of nails do you use ? Do you prefer one brand over another ?

    Yes, I prefer one brand over another.

    I prefer USA made nails over nails made in China, especially after personally conducting crude but credible (due to remarkable repeatability) bend tests of equivalently sized and equivalently coated nails in a vice, and the nails made in China severed in less than half the back and forth bends of the nails made in the USA by Tree Island Steel, who makes Halsteel and TruSpec branded nails in the US and Canada.

    The Made in China nails I have tried in the last couple of years were branded by DeWalt. The Made in Oman nails were branded by Hitachi. Neither the DeWalt nor the Hitachi branded nails could match the number of bend cycles that the Halsteel branded nails could endure.

    The test involves securing the nail within a vice at a set distance from the tip, consistently measured for each nail tested. Then the nail body is grasped with vice grips at a consistent distance from the vice jaws, and bent 90 degrees, then 180 degrees in the opposing direction, and back and forth 180 degrees each time until separation.

    On average, the Chinese made nails (such as DeWalt) separated in two bend cycles, whereas the same diameter thickness, length, and coating nail in the USA made Halsteel brand took five bend cycles to break. I don’t work for Tree Island Steel. They don’t send me nails. I pay more for their products, and through my own evaluation, discovered a convincing reason to do so.

    #709007
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Had a little time today so I pulled the drum off, removed the plate from it and got that all cleaned up.

    What did you clean it with? I like the WD40 spray it down and let it soak. I get some compressed air and a rag on it and they shine right up.
    Did you try to fire it? It should shoot.

    #709034
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    Had a little time today so I pulled the drum off, removed the plate from it and got that all cleaned up.

    What did you clean it with? I like the WD40 spray it down and let it soak. I get some compressed air and a rag on it and they shine right up.
    Did you try to fire it? It should shoot.

    I used a citrus based cleaner. The drum mag cleaned right up. Everything else is packed with crap. So much it was a chore just to open the nail guide. It’s going to take a few more soakings and blasting with air to get it all cleaned out…. I hope. If not I’ll take everything from the body down apart and soak it all in a coffee can. Didn’t try to fire it yet, want to get all the dirt cleaned up first. Even if it shoots, I doubt it could advance nails with all that dirt. I hope to spend a little more time on it tomorrow.

    #709046
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I used a citrus based cleaner.

    Once you get all the junk out WD-40 can be used to really do a good final clean. Spray it on and let it drip and all the remaining junk will come out.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #709101
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I used a citrus based cleaner.

    Once you get all the junk out WD-40 can be used to really do a good final clean. Spray it on and let it drip and all the remaining junk will come out.

    Spent some time on it today, more than expected. I doubt that gun was ever cleaned and I can see it probably didn’t function properly.. or at all. Every nook, cranny and spring was packed solid with oily junk. I ended up spraying it down with an engine degreaser multiple times today, blasting it with air and scrubbing with a tooth brush. I got most everything cleaned out and can now freely move all the moveable parts but can still feel some dirt when moving. Next go-round I’ll blast it down with WD-40… hopefully that flushes out the remaining grit. I’ll get some pics later today or tomorrow

    #709119
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    Here’s a few after clean pics. Going to need a feeder piston bumper.. it came out in pieces.

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