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Most Durable Tool

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  • #17177

    Which tool of yours has stood the test of time best?
    Taken a beating and survived?
    Or simply continues to work well after years of use?

    John S

    #17180
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I would have to say all of them. I haven’t had a tool that has given out on me yet. If I had to pick one that stood out from the rest I would probably say my thickness planer. It’s had a lot of bdft of lumber go through it over the years and it still works great.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #17261
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    hmmm id have to say my milwaukee circular saw and my makita orbital sander. the sander has been service twice, the bearings were replaced and hte pad replaced.

    the circ saw has been dropped. left in the rain and snow and keeps going, its needs a new chord put on it and the base straightened but the motor still purs.

    both tools are almost 10 years old.. there the only two tools from when i started out that are still in use today

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #17264
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    Jeff, I have to agree, My Milwaukee saw has taken a beating. As far as the cords, yup, seems like they had inferior cords for a period of time… they crack and crumble ! Before that and after the cords were OK

    #17281

    I would say that I am quite impressed with my Hilti impact so far. I am not ready to throw it off a three story building yet, but it sure is tough.

    Do you guys think the durability of tools has shifted in quality in the last ten years? Has the priority of technological innovations replaced the priority of quality materials used in the manufacturing of the tools? Or is it case by case, depending on the brand/tool?

    John S

    #17306
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I think it depends on the tool brand and the tool itself. One example I can think of would be cordless drills. From what I have seen they are built tougher now as far as withstanding drops. Some of the older drills are made of more brittle plastic that is more prone to cracking where as a lot of the new ones are made of a more flexible plastic that will absorb shock. The Bosch drills that I have are a good example of that with the rubber sections on the body and the flexible housing material.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #17314

    That is very, very true Dan – the new tough black rubber does a great job of holding up to occasional drops without flinching. And it definitely keeps the dust out pretty well

    John S

    #17340

    I have to say my 24volt drill. It fell about 12feet.
    The drill ended 5 ft from where the battery pack was.
    Yet it kept working for about three yrs after that.
    Sears told me they don’t make that battery. They said
    They never had.
    And yet I have the drill in my hands.
    So I just left it at that.

    #17347
    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    As a whole, I think tool quality has decreased. The technology is far superior, which is both good and bad. With older tools, if something broke, you could take it apart, get the replacement part, and fix it. Now there is so much circuitry and computer boards, that if something breaks, you are better off just getting a new one.

    #17392
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    That’s very true Brian. That goes for most things now especially vehicles. It gets harder and harder to fix things yourself when there are complicated electronics involved rather than just a series of mechanical parts. With more electronics being put into products the life expectancy seems to go down too. By the time something breaks the technology is obsolete so it’s not worth the money to fix it.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #17394
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I couldn’t agree more ! When things with electronics work, they work well, when they “break” you either replace them or pay the price to repair

    #17404

    This is definitely an interesting trend! It is too bad I am not better with the electrical side so I could repair my own stuff 🙁

    John S

    #17409
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    To fix things now you have to be good mechanically and electronically. If something is dead and the cost of repair is more than it’s worth or more than the cost of a new one I’ll have a go at it myself. My Porter Cable battery charger died a couple years ago so I opened it up and played around with it until I figured out that the fuse was blown. I bought a new fuse at The Source and I was back in business.

    I wonder sometimes if companies put more electronics into things to make more money since you either have to pay a fortune to have it fixed or buy a new one.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #17436

    maybe it is time for a forum about conspiracy theories 🙂 haha jk

    John S

    #17444
    parenos
    Moderator
    Honesdale, PA

    well think about it this way, if someone made a tool that lasted forever, they would be in essence putting themselves out of business. That’s why so many more cordless tools are being brought to market. They are more convenient, but they also have batteries that die. Dead batteries lead to new tools because replacement batteries cost so much, that it makes more sense to get something new

    #17446
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    That’s true Brian. That would probably be part of the reason that really good tools are more expensive since they will last you longer and fewer replacements will be purchased down the road.

    Ok here’s an example of a new tool being cheaper than replacing the batteries or charger. The Bosch DDS180-03 cordless drill is $169 on Amazon. If you buy the same two batteries and charger separately they come to $224.97 and that is with no drill. So for $55.97 less you can have a whole new drill, batteries and charger rather than replacing just the batteries and charger if they crap out.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #17449

    Cordless is definitely a profitable sector for tool companies – as you have all mentioned the high cost of replacing batteries… But you can’t say that we don’t get our value out of being cord free!! So on some level, it is win-win for the Man and us 🙂 I still would tend to agree, that buying cordless you just have to know that you will, sooner or later, absolutely have to replace your batteries. On some of my corded tools, they very well may last 10 to 30 years (my Hilti hammer drill) because of how rarely I use it / assuming I take care of it.
    -But in 30 years, can you even imagine what a hammerdrill looks like and how it functions? Man…

    I am curious to see what the (immediate and distant) future of quality corded tools like. Especially with regards to the huge popularity of impact drivers. I am curious if anybody will start making corded impacts… I know Hitachi makes one and recently B&D added one I think as well.

    John S

    #17493
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Have you seen this one John?

    http://www.makita.ca/index2.php?event=tool&id=780&catid=3

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #17548

    longest lasting would be my humble dremel oscillating tool… blades for various tasks aren’t the cheapest and don’t always last as long as I’d like, but the oscillating tool itself hasn’t batted an eye at anything I’ve thrown at it or dropped on it.

    #17559
    goldss
    Pro

    My most durable tool would have be my Vaughn 16oz. hammers.I’ve probably replaced 10 wooden handles, but the heads on the pair that I’ve had for a lot of years have not failed.

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