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Metal screws stripped bunk beds very loose

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  • #727776
    Jen2598
    Pro

    Hello.. we have a metal bunk bed and the screws are stripped. It is very loose and not sure if this can be fixed. Any ideas on how to repair this would be greatly appreciated. Unfortunately welding is not an option. Thank you!
    Jen

    #727780
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Are the screws stripped or the insert that they go into? Or is it the head of the screw that is bad?

    #727781
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    You could drill a hole all the way through the headboard and get a longer machine screw and bolt it all the way through and put a washer and nut on.
    Hope that makes sense . Or get a larger screw and try that.

    #727787
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Hard to really see what the real issue or potential solution(s) is with such dark pictures. I’m sure there’s a dozen ways to fix this, some uglier than others.

    #727838

    Are the screws stripped or the insert that they go into? Or is it the head of the screw that is bad?

    That’s what I was thinking , if it is the threads in the frame , you can always go up one size , or replace the threads with a rivnut , basically a new threaded insert
    If it’s the screw/bolt , just replace that and add a lock washer

    You can always fix it like roninohio suggested.

    These are rivnuts.

    #727863
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    From the pics you posted, it looks like weldnuts on the frame have stripped with use. I like both the idea of drilling out and tapping to a larger size bolt and the alternative of drilling and installing a rivnut. The rivnut would have the advantage of providing a longer thread and may be the longest lasting solution.

    Let us know how you tackle the problem.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #727890
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I have a feeling that tapping out to a larger size is not an option as if he had a tap set, it would have come to mind to him.

    #727894
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    From the pics you posted, it looks like weldnuts on the frame have stripped with use. I like both the idea of drilling out and tapping to a larger size bolt and the alternative of drilling and installing a rivnut. The rivnut would have the advantage of providing a longer thread and may be the longest lasting solution.

    Let us know how you tackle the problem.

    That is my guess also that the rivnuts need to be replaced. If you have the right tools, tot to bad of a fix. In this type of frames it seems to be a problem. At the lake we have bunk beds that have a similar construction and when the kids were younger, I was tightening the screws all the time. If I had not, something surely would have stripped.

    #727936
    CB
    Pro

    I like rivnuts. They are neat way to blind fasten into sheet steel with a removable and replaceable machine screw. I’ve even used them in the back of my truck to hold things down… but not to hold things up.

    The difference is in the lateral loading of the screw. A rivnut might be inclined to twist upwards inside the tube with cyclical shock loads, especially if kids are jumping or adults are _umping on the bed.

    All the sturdier solutions I can think of would be more difficult to execute though.

    Briefly… fabricating bushings with radiused ends, fishing them through the bottom of the bed post tube inline with the holes, and through bolting through both walls of the tube, where the bushing keeps the tube from collapsing under the clamp load. The through bolts would be similar to those used on lawnmower handles… T bolts with arched heads that follow the contour of the round tubing, to minimize snagging of the bedspread on the outer wall of the tube. The arched head also serves as the anti rotation feature as the nut is brought to final torque value.

    If two through bolts (per joint) is still not sufficient, then I would find decorative metal shelf brackets of similar surface patina as the bed post and rail, and use these shelf brackets as supplemental angular gussets to the rails, increasing the geometry of the triangle that keeps the post and rails perpendicular to each other. Modifications would need to be made to the shelf bracket to work around the existing small triangle under the rail, so it is important the shelf bracket be of triangular design with a welded hypotenuse, not just an L bracket.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #727939
    Jen2598
    Pro

    Hello and thank you for all of your advise. I really appreciate you taking the time to share your knowledge. The beds are in a summer place that we rent out and we were worried about the stability of the beds and had a very limited to fix. We took the beds down for now and when we go back in two weeks I will follow up but feel confident now applying your suggestions!

    A thousand thanks to all of you!
    Jen Charapata

    #727948

    Hello and thank you for all of your advise. I really appreciate you taking the time to share your knowledge. The beds are in a summer place that we rent out and we were worried about the stability of the beds and had a very limited to fix. We took the beds down for now and when we go back in two weeks I will follow up but feel confident now applying your suggestions!

    A thousand thanks to all of you!
    Jen Charapata

    Glad you found some answers.
    Looking forward to seeing the fix , if you actually do need rivnuts , I have a good selection of them , from 6/32 to up to 3/8 and even one size around 1/2 inch. Also for different thickness and countersink or top mounted.
    An easy fix is you can use typical hardware to install them , you don’t necessarily have to buy the specific tools for the install.
    I’ve done it before with just typical hardware.

    Good luck , and welcome to BTP.

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