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Masonry Question Brick wall Support

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  • #748404
    dk_99
    Pro

    OK I have an odd question, I noticed the bottom outside corner of the garage door was crumbling. I started digging at the corner there is no foundation, I can see dirt.
    From the looks of it the garage door size might was reduced and some sort of brick or block was used and covered with parging.

    My worry now is that part of the brick wall is supported by this.
    Do I need to remove it? or just had some concrete to shore it up?
    what can I do to fix this?

    I have included pics.

    #748432
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    In my opinion you have concrete block in that location that has disintegrated. I have seen this many times where the block continually exposed to wetting and drying will start to fail. This is especially common in areas where it may be exposed to salt in freeze thaw climates. There is probably a foundation there but the couple courses of block have deteriorated.

    Based on Photo 2 it appears that there was block there at one time. My guess is that at some time in the past the block was crumbling and a previous owner had the surface of the block parged thinking it would protect it. The probably did not get all the loose material removed in all areas which did not allow the parging to bond properly.

    I would remove all the loose material and fill the void with concrete then use a parging again to coat the surface to make everything look uniform. Once done, I would coat the area with a water seal every year or two to keep moisture and chemicals from affecting it again.

    #748433
    Doobie
    Moderator

    What Kurt said. 👍

    #748503
    dk_99
    Pro

    Thanks that sounds like a good plan, appreciate the help

    DK

    #748640

    I wonder if the previous owner didn’t drive into that spot since it’s right next to the door frame and patch badly . I would add just use a good bonding agent on all existing concrete before applying new material .

    Always willing to learn .

    #748668
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I wonder if the previous owner didn’t drive into that spot since it’s right next to the door frame and patch badly . I would add just use a good bonding agent on all existing concrete before applying new material .

    Good additional point. Didn’t think of that myself and that’s what I’ve always done in the past.

    Even more would be to add some imbedded stems in the surrounding solid crete before the pour if feasible. Just added insurance.

    #748707

    I wonder if the previous owner didn’t drive into that spot since it’s right next to the door frame and patch badly . I would add just use a good bonding agent on all existing concrete before applying new material .

    Good additional point. Didn’t think of that myself and that’s what I’ve always done in the past.

    Even more would be to add some imbedded stems in the surrounding solid crete before the pour if feasible. Just added insurance.

    Have you seen the plastic rebar they have over the traditional steel ones .

    Always willing to learn .

    #748715
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I wonder if the previous owner didn’t drive into that spot since it’s right next to the door frame and patch badly . I would add just use a good bonding agent on all existing concrete before applying new material .

    Good additional point. Didn’t think of that myself and that’s what I’ve always done in the past.

    Even more would be to add some imbedded stems in the surrounding solid crete before the pour if feasible. Just added insurance.

    Have you seen the plastic rebar they have over the traditional steel ones .

    No I haven’t. I guess the advantage would be corrosion resistance in the future should a crack develop, or does it go beyond that reason?

    #748717
    dk_99
    Pro

    Thanks for the advise, but it is due to a car hitting it, since it is replicated on the right side of the door as well.

    #748760

    Thanks for the advise, but it is due to a car hitting it, since it is replicated on the right side of the door as well.

    Quick question would homeowners insurance or Automobile insurance cover the cost of repairs to the house . But I’m guessing that would require a claim be made .

    Always willing to learn .

    #748873
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    A car hitting the wall on both sides of a wide garage wall? This low?

    #748875
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    No I haven’t. I guess the advantage would be corrosion resistance in the future should a crack develop, or does it go beyond that reason?

    FRP rebars are made of fiberglass. They don’t corrode. Well, epoxy coated rebars resist corrosion as well. In addition, they are much lighter to handle, transport and install. Although you can’t bend them on site like you can with steel rebars. The issue with steel rebars isn’t just corrosion after install, it’s corrosion before install. This material can be dropped and staged at a site for weeks or even months, exposed to rain while waiting to be used. It’s already half rusted by the time they are unbundled. fiberglass rebars are necessary in some medical buildings that requires EM neutral walls, like places with MRI machines.

    #748992
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    I agree with Kurt that this could be a water issue accelerated by freeze/thaw and salt.

    When I see this on buildings there are a few possible issues.
    1. Water is working it way down from above and this is the best area for it to escape. This damage can be worsened by freeze/thaw/salt and damage from shovel.

    2. Water is draining below that area and working it’s way up the block accelerated by freeze/thaw/salt

    3. Salt and snow buildup in that area during winter left to soak into the wall and block.

    I’m sure there could be more reasons but generally these are the most common.

    Also, a fancy parge fix generally doesn’t last more then a couple years.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #749109

    I agree with Kurt that this could be a water issue accelerated by freeze/thaw and salt.

    When I see this on buildings there are a few possible issues.

    1. Water is working it way down from above and this is the best area for it to escape. This damage can be worsened by freeze/thaw/salt and damage from shovel.

    2. Water is draining below that area and working it’s way up the block accelerated by freeze/thaw/salt

    3. Salt and snow buildup in that area during winter left to soak into the wall and block.

    I’m sure there could be more reasons but generally these are the most common.

    Also, a fancy parge fix generally doesn’t last more then a couple years.

    If a parge is down correctly and sealed does hold moisture in the wall causing more damage .

    Always willing to learn .

    #749929

    It looks like the block is missing from the place, put concrete in it and page it.
    Do not forget to put a bonding agent before putting concrete,

    #750619
    dk_99
    Pro

    Complete

    Hi Everyone just wanted to give you all an update, After your suggestion, I was able to patch the hole and re-parge the from.
    DK

    Attachments:
    #750623
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    I’m surprised to see the stack joints on the brick. Was it originally like that?

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #750629
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Hi Everyone just wanted to give you all an update, After your suggestion, I was able to patch the hole and re-parge the from.
    DK

    Hey, that’s great. Glad you gave us an update. Too often we don’t get to hear back on things like this.

    👍

    #750643
    dk_99
    Pro

    Yes it is , for a pattern the bricklayers did.

    #750664
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m surprised to see the stack joints on the brick. Was it originally like that?

    Yes it is , for a pattern the bricklayers did.

    We’ll assume this is the post you were answering to in that reply.

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