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Makita XDT12M/DTD170/TD170 18V LXT Brushless Impact Driver REVIEW

This topic contains 19 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  bbernardesjr87 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • #655114

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    Hello guys,

    I’ve been using this impact driver for quite a while, a good friend let me try it while he was taking holidays 40 away lol.
    So, I’m going to try to express my personal impressions here.

    NOTE: (I already used other impact drivers like Dewalt DCF887, Bosch IDH182, Milwaukee M18 Fuel 2653, old Ryobi ones and some 12v, then I believe I have good notion to compare.)

    4 words to start: FAST – LIGHT – STRONG – CONFORTABLE

    This impact driver was first released in Japan, available in different colours, Black, White, Blue, Pink, Green, Red and Brown.
    I got some internet pictures to show some colours.

    SOME SPECS:

    Model: Makita XDT12M, Makita XDT12Z (Bare Tool)
    Battery: 18V LXT Lithium-Ion
    No Load Speed (4 speed): 0 – 1,100 / 0 – 2,100 / 0 – 3,200 / 0 – 3,600 RPM
    Impacts Per Minute (4 speed): 0 – 1,100 / 0 – 2,600 / 0 – 3,600 / 0 – 3,800 IPM
    Maximum Torque: 1,550 in.lbs.
    Hex Shank : 1/4″
    Overall Length: 4-5/8″
    Weight (with battery): 3.38 lbs.
    Includes: 18V LXT Lithium-Ion batteries, rapid charger, tool case
    Warranty: 3-year
    Price: US$186.99 (Bare Tool), you can get it in different colours from Japan on Ebay.

    On paper, the Makita XDT12M looks solid and matches what the XDT09 offered. That means we can expect up to 3600 RPM, 3800 IPM, and 1550 inch pounds of torque.
    The RPM is pretty much at the top of the rankings already and allows for very fast screw driving. The impact rate nearly follows suit but has been bested by Hitachi’s Triple Hammer Impact Driver at 4000 IPM.
    Torque is well under the 2250 inch pounds of torque we found in the Ridgid Gen5X impact driver. However, keep in mind what you need an impact driver for. The specifications on the Makita XDT12M are dialed in for fast screw driving. The torque rating is enough to handle small lag screws, so you’ll have to decide for yourself how far into the realm of an impact wrench you expect your impact driver to go.

    ERGONOMICS:

    Makita has been getting lighter and more compact with their impact driver classes for some time. However, the Makita XDT12M is just a hair heavier than the XDT09. Heavier is relative course – this new model is 1.96 pounds bare and 3.38 pounds with a 4.0 amp hour battery.
    I measured the new Makita impact driver at 4-5/8 inches long – just a touch shorter than the XDT09. The XDT12 also shares the ergonomic handle and rubber overmold of the 09 model, which is a slight upgrade from some of their previous 18-volt and current 12-volt models. It’s textured a bit more to give a slightly more secure grip, with or without gloves it fells great.
    Essentially, Makita has packed their new impact driver into the XDT09 housing with only minor changes.

    CONTROL CENTER:

    Milwaukee’s One-Key impact driver may be the King of customization, but this Makita isn’t being totally left behind. For starters, Makita put 4 standard impact driver modes on this model. Most Pro level impact drivers these days have 3 modes, so you get a little more control between low and high speeds.
    Like the XDT09, Makita included Quick-Shift, AKA T–Mode. This mode is optimized for fastening in metal applications where a self-tapping screw is often employed to cut through the metal before the threads grab. The danger comes in the form of the impact driver’s high speed, you need that speed to let the tip cut through the metal. Once that happens, there’s little resistance when the threads catch and it’s not uncommon to destroy a bit, cam out a screw head, or sheer a screw head off.
    Makita’s Quick-Shift Mode starts the drive fast and when it feels the resistance, it slows down to help you control the end of the drive.
    Makita also included their new Assist Mode in this model. Assist Mode essentially does the opposite of T-mode. It starts the drive slow and then accelerates to finish the drive quickly. This mode is perfect for driving screws in wood, particularly when you want an accurate start.
    (I found out many guys don’t use/like that assist mode)

    EXTRA FEATURES?

    The LED light is still situated above the trigger like the previous model. The difference is you now have more control over that as well. There is an on-off switch for the light next to the other controls on the tool. Pull the trigger to activate the light like you normally would, then press the button and the light is off. Now when you pull the trigger, the light will remain off. Press the light button again to switch it back to its normal operating mode.

    I believe that’s it guys, remember those are my personal impressions.

    Cheers,
    Ben

    #655129

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Thank you for the review. Really enjoyed reading about your impressions on what seems like a fine tool.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #655150

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    Thank you for the review. Really enjoyed reading about your impressions on what seems like a fine tool.

    Thanks Bill, in fact it is a very impressive tool.

    #655151

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I use mine every single day! It’s never failed to impress. Frankly, I rarely use my big impact wrench anymore.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #655179

    Hello guys,

    I’ve been using this impact driver for quite a while, a good friend let me try it while he was taking holidays 40 away lol.
    So, I’m going to try to express my personal impressions here.

    NOTE: (I already used other impact drivers like Dewalt DCF887, Bosch IDH182, Milwaukee M18 Fuel 2653, old Ryobi ones and some 12v, then I believe I have good notion to compare.)

    4 words to start: FAST – LIGHT – STRONG – CONFORTABLE

    This impact driver was first released in Japan, available in different colours, Black, White, Blue, Pink, Green, Red and Brown.
    I got some internet pictures to show some colours.

    SOME SPECS:

    Model: Makita XDT12M, Makita XDT12Z (Bare Tool)
    Battery: 18V LXT Lithium-Ion
    No Load Speed (4 speed): 0 – 1,100 / 0 – 2,100 / 0 – 3,200 / 0 – 3,600 RPM
    Impacts Per Minute (4 speed): 0 – 1,100 / 0 – 2,600 / 0 – 3,600 / 0 – 3,800 IPM
    Maximum Torque: 1,550 in.lbs.
    Hex Shank : 1/4″
    Overall Length: 4-5/8″
    Weight (with battery): 3.38 lbs.
    Includes: 18V LXT Lithium-Ion batteries, rapid charger, tool case
    Warranty: 3-year
    Price: US$186.99 (Bare Tool), you can get it in different colours from Japan on Ebay.

    On paper, the Makita XDT12M looks solid and matches what the XDT09 offered. That means we can expect up to 3600 RPM, 3800 IPM, and 1550 inch pounds of torque.
    The RPM is pretty much at the top of the rankings already and allows for very fast screw driving. The impact rate nearly follows suit but has been bested by Hitachi’s Triple Hammer Impact Driver at 4000 IPM.
    Torque is well under the 2250 inch pounds of torque we found in the Ridgid Gen5X impact driver. However, keep in mind what you need an impact driver for. The specifications on the Makita XDT12M are dialed in for fast screw driving. The torque rating is enough to handle small lag screws, so you’ll have to decide for yourself how far into the realm of an impact wrench you expect your impact driver to go.

    ERGONOMICS:

    Makita has been getting lighter and more compact with their impact driver classes for some time. However, the Makita XDT12M is just a hair heavier than the XDT09. Heavier is relative course – this new model is 1.96 pounds bare and 3.38 pounds with a 4.0 amp hour battery.
    I measured the new Makita impact driver at 4-5/8 inches long – just a touch shorter than the XDT09. The XDT12 also shares the ergonomic handle and rubber overmold of the 09 model, which is a slight upgrade from some of their previous 18-volt and current 12-volt models. It’s textured a bit more to give a slightly more secure grip, with or without gloves it fells great.
    Essentially, Makita has packed their new impact driver into the XDT09 housing with only minor changes.

    CONTROL CENTER:

    Milwaukee’s One-Key impact driver may be the King of customization, but this Makita isn’t being totally left behind. For starters, Makita put 4 standard impact driver modes on this model. Most Pro level impact drivers these days have 3 modes, so you get a little more control between low and high speeds.
    Like the XDT09, Makita included Quick-Shift, AKA T–Mode. This mode is optimized for fastening in metal applications where a self-tapping screw is often employed to cut through the metal before the threads grab. The danger comes in the form of the impact driver’s high speed, you need that speed to let the tip cut through the metal. Once that happens, there’s little resistance when the threads catch and it’s not uncommon to destroy a bit, cam out a screw head, or sheer a screw head off.
    Makita’s Quick-Shift Mode starts the drive fast and when it feels the resistance, it slows down to help you control the end of the drive.
    Makita also included their new Assist Mode in this model. Assist Mode essentially does the opposite of T-mode. It starts the drive slow and then accelerates to finish the drive quickly. This mode is perfect for driving screws in wood, particularly when you want an accurate start. Here’s another video, this time with Assist Mode in action. If you turn up your volume, you’ll hear the mode take over as it accelerates into the drive.
    (I found out many guys don’t use/like that assist mode)

    EXTRA FEATURES?

    The LED light is still situated above the trigger like the previous model. The difference is you now have more control over that as well. There is an on-off switch for the light next to the other controls on the tool. Pull the trigger to activate the light like you normally would, then press the button and the light is off. Now when you pull the trigger, the light will remain off. Press the light button again to switch it back to its normal operating mode.

    I believe that’s it guys, remember those are my personal impressions.

    Cheers,
    Ben

    Thanks for the review. Makita is really impressing me lately

    #655182

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    Awesome review Ben, thanks for taking the time. seems like it’s a solid tool

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    Palm Springs, CA

    #655184

    xtsallad
    Pro
    Dallas, TX

    Thanks for the review!

    I own an XDT14 which has the same specs except it is 3 speed with T-Mode but no Assist mode. I wouldn’t need the assist mode, personally, as it starts slow and doesn’t speed up until your fastener is already half way in in most cases. I find it easier to use trigger control for that and speed up when I want. My father could use it since he only fully depresses any trigger. The ‘14 is also made in a Makita factory in China rather than Japan. I’ve seen torque testing on the ‘12 somewhere in an online review and it hits in the 1800 in.lb. range. I believe that when comparing my ‘14 with my other impacts in work use. It has much more torque than my IDH182 and makes the 182 seem slow. The Makita has become my go-to impact. The T-Mode is really nice and I end up using the fulll range of modes regularly. The T-Moode is perfect for metal fasteners and allows you to drive them fast and not shear the fastener heads. It helps with wood screws as well by shifting from highest speed to the next down upon impact engagement and allows more control to keep from over-driving flat head screws and not stripping pan head and washer head screws, especially in softer woods as the impact mechanism usually doesn’t even start until the fastener head is countersinking.

    Here is a link of a really good teradown of one, I think the XDT14, but not exactly sure. The guy is super smart and hilarious.
    youtube.com/watch?v=aZUbbu6J19E

    j

    #655197

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    I use mine every single day! It’s never failed to impress. Frankly, I rarely use my big impact wrench anymore.

    Being honest Jon, while using it I got myself in the same situation…just put away the wrench.
    Super powerful, it is magic!

    #655198

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    Hello guys,

    I’ve been using this impact driver for quite a while, a good friend let me try it while he was taking holidays 40 away lol.
    So, I’m going to try to express my personal impressions here.

    NOTE: (I already used other impact drivers like Dewalt DCF887, Bosch IDH182, Milwaukee M18 Fuel 2653, old Ryobi ones and some 12v, then I believe I have good notion to compare.)

    4 words to start: FAST – LIGHT – STRONG – CONFORTABLE

    This impact driver was first released in Japan, available in different colours, Black, White, Blue, Pink, Green, Red and Brown.
    I got some internet pictures to show some colours.

    SOME SPECS:

    Model: Makita XDT12M, Makita XDT12Z (Bare Tool)
    Battery: 18V LXT Lithium-Ion
    No Load Speed (4 speed): 0 – 1,100 / 0 – 2,100 / 0 – 3,200 / 0 – 3,600 RPM
    Impacts Per Minute (4 speed): 0 – 1,100 / 0 – 2,600 / 0 – 3,600 / 0 – 3,800 IPM
    Maximum Torque: 1,550 in.lbs.
    Hex Shank : 1/4″
    Overall Length: 4-5/8″
    Weight (with battery): 3.38 lbs.
    Includes: 18V LXT Lithium-Ion batteries, rapid charger, tool case
    Warranty: 3-year
    Price: US$186.99 (Bare Tool), you can get it in different colours from Japan on Ebay.

    On paper, the Makita XDT12M looks solid and matches what the XDT09 offered. That means we can expect up to 3600 RPM, 3800 IPM, and 1550 inch pounds of torque.
    The RPM is pretty much at the top of the rankings already and allows for very fast screw driving. The impact rate nearly follows suit but has been bested by Hitachi’s Triple Hammer Impact Driver at 4000 IPM.
    Torque is well under the 2250 inch pounds of torque we found in the Ridgid Gen5X impact driver. However, keep in mind what you need an impact driver for. The specifications on the Makita XDT12M are dialed in for fast screw driving. The torque rating is enough to handle small lag screws, so you’ll have to decide for yourself how far into the realm of an impact wrench you expect your impact driver to go.

    ERGONOMICS:

    Makita has been getting lighter and more compact with their impact driver classes for some time. However, the Makita XDT12M is just a hair heavier than the XDT09. Heavier is relative course – this new model is 1.96 pounds bare and 3.38 pounds with a 4.0 amp hour battery.
    I measured the new Makita impact driver at 4-5/8 inches long – just a touch shorter than the XDT09. The XDT12 also shares the ergonomic handle and rubber overmold of the 09 model, which is a slight upgrade from some of their previous 18-volt and current 12-volt models. It’s textured a bit more to give a slightly more secure grip, with or without gloves it fells great.
    Essentially, Makita has packed their new impact driver into the XDT09 housing with only minor changes.

    CONTROL CENTER:

    Milwaukee’s One-Key impact driver may be the King of customization, but this Makita isn’t being totally left behind. For starters, Makita put 4 standard impact driver modes on this model. Most Pro level impact drivers these days have 3 modes, so you get a little more control between low and high speeds.
    Like the XDT09, Makita included Quick-Shift, AKA T–Mode. This mode is optimized for fastening in metal applications where a self-tapping screw is often employed to cut through the metal before the threads grab. The danger comes in the form of the impact driver’s high speed, you need that speed to let the tip cut through the metal. Once that happens, there’s little resistance when the threads catch and it’s not uncommon to destroy a bit, cam out a screw head, or sheer a screw head off.
    Makita’s Quick-Shift Mode starts the drive fast and when it feels the resistance, it slows down to help you control the end of the drive.
    Makita also included their new Assist Mode in this model. Assist Mode essentially does the opposite of T-mode. It starts the drive slow and then accelerates to finish the drive quickly. This mode is perfect for driving screws in wood, particularly when you want an accurate start. Here’s another video, this time with Assist Mode in action. If you turn up your volume, you’ll hear the mode take over as it accelerates into the drive.
    (I found out many guys don’t use/like that assist mode)

    EXTRA FEATURES?

    The LED light is still situated above the trigger like the previous model. The difference is you now have more control over that as well. There is an on-off switch for the light next to the other controls on the tool. Pull the trigger to activate the light like you normally would, then press the button and the light is off. Now when you pull the trigger, the light will remain off. Press the light button again to switch it back to its normal operating mode.

    I believe that’s it guys, remember those are my personal impressions.

    Cheers,
    Ben

    Thanks for the review. Makita is really impressing me lately

    Thanks Eric, it also happened to me, they have really good tools.

    #655199

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    Awesome review Ben, thanks for taking the time. seems like it’s a solid tool

    Hey Alex, thanks!
    Solid solid tool man, I took some time to write this down, however its worthy, wouldn’t be fair, like…to try this and not tell other people how good and impressive this little tool is.

    #655201

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    xtsallad

    Thanks Jason!

    Honestly I prefer to use the trigger over Assist Mode as well. Funny thing my Dad does the same as yours lol.
    Agree on that, the IDH182 seem slow compared to this one, however its a great tool.
    The one I tested was made in Japan.

    #655215

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    nice to see another review.. everyone who uses it has nothing bad to say about it

    i noticed in the stafda posts last week the newest makita impacts coming next year have tech in them that allows it to sense automatcially when its no longer under load and will not only shut down the anvil action but will slow down the speed to similulate finger tightening nuts or bolts

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #655246

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I use mine evry day also and love it! I know it’s better that the best DeWalt ans have used them side by side and raced them too.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #655305

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    i noticed in the stafda posts last week the newest makita impacts coming next year have tech in them that allows it to sense automatcially when its no longer under load and will not only shut down the anvil action but will slow down the speed to similulate finger tightening nuts or bolts

    Wow that is a nice feature right there and will save some stripped threads for sure.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #655345

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    nice to see another review.. everyone who uses it has nothing bad to say about it

    i noticed in the stafda posts last week the newest makita impacts coming next year have tech in them that allows it to sense automatcially when its no longer under load and will not only shut down the anvil action but will slow down the speed to similulate finger tightening nuts or bolts

    Hey Jeff, I heard about that. It’s very impressive how technology have been so fast and giving us amazing tools.

    #655348

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    I use mine evry day also and love it! I know it’s better that the best DeWalt ans have used them side by side and raced them too.

    Glad to hear you like yours Dirty, never heard anyone complaining about that model. Make others seem slow, however other brands do have good impacts as well.

    #655349

    That’s a pretty complete review. I was looking at them at a tool show and they sure are a compact unit. Felt comfy in the hand too.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #655382

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    however other brands do have good impacts as well.

    Great review by the way!
    Yes other brands do have good impacts that will do what is needed. The first company to have battery tools on the market here was Makita and that’s when I started with them and just never switched.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #655405

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    That’s a pretty complete review. I was looking at them at a tool show and they sure are a compact unit. Felt comfy in the hand too.

    Thanks Jim!

    #655407

    bbernardesjr87
    Pro
    Mississauga, Ontario

    however other brands do have good impacts as well.

    Great review by the way!
    Yes other brands do have good impacts that will do what is needed. The first company to have battery tools on the market here was Makita and that’s when I started with them and just never switched.

    I completely understand you, that happened with some friends too, now they stick with only one brand since they started.

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