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Machine Sanders (drum, disc, etc)

This topic contains 94 replies, has 25 voices, and was last updated by  theamcguy 8 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 95 total)
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  • #284595

    I was looking at this Supermax sander again trying to understand what people were saying about it… the way I am reading it, some guys act like it can serve in place of a planer or jointer? I got confused… anyone able to explain the drum sander vs. planer for a dummy like me lol

    John S

    #284650

    The sander has a flat bed to feed stock through. So if you want to get to a specific thickness you can adjust the bed height (raising it up) to get to the desired thickness just as you would with a planer. You are removing material slower than a planer normally would. If you have highly figured wood the sander will be better to reduce chip and tear out. The sander’s bed is a conveyor belt that moves the wood versus rollers in a planer from a mechanical standpoint. I hope that does it for you @supimeister.

    #284658

    The sander has a flat bed to feed stock through. So if you want to get to a specific thickness you can adjust the bed height (raising it up) to get to the desired thickness just as you would with a planer. You are removing material slower than a planer normally would. If you have highly figured wood the sander will be better to reduce chip and tear out. The sander’s bed is a conveyor belt that moves the wood versus rollers in a planer from a mechanical standpoint. I hope that does it for you @supimeister.

    Thanks Lon – so why not just get a drum sander rather than a planer? For the times you want to take more material off with the planer?

    John S

    #284803

    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    so why not just get a drum sander rather than a planer?

    Seems that you’d go through a lot of paper that way.
    One’s for prep, the other for finishing. One makes shavings, the other makes dust.
    I’d love to even have access to drum sander.

    #284804

    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    I’ve got a 6×48″ belt sander. I’m finally using the right tool for the job. There’s a wide variety of grits and materials for the belts and the machine itself is stable.
    For a spindle sander I use the drill press. I’m aware of concerns about side pressure on the spindle, so I don’t use it to try to take off lots of material.
    I also use a drum hooked to the RAS. The drum just barely comes out (horizontally) of a box/table acting sort of like a half a planer.
    It has its uses, but is pretty crude.

    #284928

    Thanks Lon – so why not just get a drum sander rather than a planer? For the times you want to take more material off with the planer?

    Seems that you’d go through a lot of paper that way.
    One’s for prep, the other for finishing. One makes shavings, the other makes dust

    @supimeister, planers will take care of dimensioning much quicker than a drum sander. You could run a lot of material through a planer before you took off enough on a drum sander. As Toolshead mentions, there is the cost of sandpaper and if you have a single drum, there would be a need to switchout grits. Shavings are easier to deal than dust. Portable planers can do a great job and good drum sanders are going to be a lot more expensive than the portable planer. You probably know I have the DeWalt 735 and a Powermatic 27″ Dual Drum sander. I would rather run lumber through the planer to get the job done quicker if the character of the wood allows.

    #284936

    crotalusco
    Pro
    west bend, wi

    ideally get both, beyond that it will depend on how you buy your lumber. Rough cut you almost need a planer. If you buy dimensional a sander might be ok for taking the occasional board down to another size

    #285530

    Thanks for helping it make more sense for me guys. Of course, sounds like both tools may need to find a way into my future hypothetical larger shop 🙂

    John S

    #285536

    Another thought @supimeister that should have hit me earlier. Drum sanders depending on configuration will handle much wider material than a planer. This a fantastic tool for sanding face frames, panel doors, wide glue-ups, etc. If you are going to build cabinets and furniture, the drum sander is invaluable.

    #286522

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Does anyone use a stationary belt sander in their shop? I made a jig for my handheld 4×24″ sander that allows me to use it upside down…the problem is that it has a small work surface. I’m thinking of picking up a 6×48 belt sander with a 9 disc. Menards house brand MasterForce has a good looking model for $219. Thoughts?

    http://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardware/power-tools/sanders/masterforce-6×9-belt-disc-sander/p-1498339.htm?cm_vc=PDPZ1

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #286536

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    The cabinet shop has a 6X120 edge sander. One of the tools that would be hard to do without. It is really nice for sanding glue joints.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #286551

    Does anyone use a stationary belt sander in their shop? I made a jig for my handheld 4×24″ sander that allows me to use it upside down…the problem is that it has a small work surface. I’m thinking of picking up a 6×48 belt sander with a 9 disc. Menards house brand MasterForce has a good looking model for $219. Thoughts?

    I am not sold on Menards MasterForce tools. Here are a couple of alternative sanders that are similar:

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/818917/Jet-Benchtop-6-x-48-Belt–9-Disc-Sander-34HP-1Ph-115V-Model-JSG-96.aspx

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/861425/Rikon-6-x-48-Belt-10-Disc-Sander-with-Stand-50-122.aspx

    Jet is more expensive but their equipment is solid.

    #286568

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Does anyone use a stationary belt sander in their shop? I made a jig for my handheld 4×24″ sander that allows me to use it upside down…the problem is that it has a small work surface. I’m thinking of picking up a 6×48 belt sander with a 9 disc. Menards house brand MasterForce has a good looking model for $219. Thoughts?

    I am not sold on Menards MasterForce tools. Here are a couple of alternative sanders that are similar:

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/818917/Jet-Benchtop-6-x-48-Belt–9-Disc-Sander-34HP-1Ph-115V-Model-JSG-96.aspx

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/861425/Rikon-6-x-48-Belt-10-Disc-Sander-with-Stand-50-122.aspx

    Jet is more expensive but their equipment is solid.

    Jet makes some great stuff, but I happen to have some Menards rebate money to spend…and I’ve been considering buying a stationary belt sander for a while and I though this one would do the job.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #286595

    That’s your call Jon. I hope it does what you want it to do. Let us know how well it performs.

    #286619

    This a fantastic tool for sanding face frames, panel doors, wide glue-ups, etc. If you are going to build cabinets and furniture, the drum sander is invaluable.

    I always thought I would just hand plane my way to smoothness if I ever built something like that 😉

    Sounds like that Masterforce belt sander could be an interesting option for you @jponto07

    John S

    #286731

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Does anyone use a stationary belt sander in their shop?

    I do but use it for metal. I bought a similar one from Craftsman in the 80s. Still going strong. The deal is to check out the tracking mechanism. The one I have is a bit flakey and I need to watch it or the belt will track off center of the rollers.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #286754

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    This a fantastic tool for sanding face frames, panel doors, wide glue-ups, etc. If you are going to build cabinets and furniture, the drum sander is invaluable.

    I always thought I would just hand plane my way to smoothness if I ever built something like that ;)

    Sounds like that Masterforce belt sander could be an interesting option for you @jponto07

    The problem with planing face frames is that the grain inherently goes in two different directions. You’ll likely get tear out trying to plane two ajoining perpendicular grains. Sanding is the best option if the face frames don’t line up perfectly.

    I think I’m going to grab the sander today and try it out…it can ways go back if it’s a dud.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #286783

    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    The nice thing about sanding face frames is that there is not a lot of meat there.

    A table top on the other hand can be a chore.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #286830

    staker
    Pro

    I have a 6×48 belt with a 9″ disc, paid 25 bucks. Always search the used market first. I find it a must have in the shop.

    #287921

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    This a fantastic tool for sanding face frames, panel doors, wide glue-ups, etc. If you are going to build cabinets and furniture, the drum sander is invaluable.

    I always thought I would just hand plane my way to smoothness if I ever built something like that ;)

    Sounds like that Masterforce belt sander could be an interesting option for you @jponto07

    The problem with planing face frames is that the grain inherently goes in two different directions. You’ll likely get tear out trying to plane two ajoining perpendicular grains. Sanding is the best option if the face frames don’t line up perfectly.

    I think I’m going to grab the sander today and try it out…it can ways go back if it’s a dud.

    What a waste of time! The sander bogged down on a little scrap of pine… I was actually able to make the belt STOP!

    I took the sander back 24 hours after bought it… I guess the Masterforce brand is hit and miss. I have their Bench grinder and Drill press. Both have been great… This sanding machine was a huge bust though.

    I’ll be scouring Craigslist for a used model. Hopefully something pops up!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

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