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Looking for opinions on building a craft desk for my wife

This topic contains 25 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  DirtyWhiteBoy 1 week, 4 days ago.

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  • #535066

    A torsion box

    A torsion box I missed that part in framing class.

    Here’s a pic of the torsion box top when I was putting it together and a pic of my assembly table after it was done. Basically an MDF skin on each face and a grid in the middle. Makes for a super rigid and flat top.

    That torsion top brings back memories of before cheap imported doors flooded the market and big box stores edged out small supplies. I made a few ply flat panel doors using this method … the core of the door had a similar pattern to it, we would just cut up any old pine scraps run them to a uniform thickness (say 3/8’s) then set them approx 2″ apart on to your first sheet of ply then set out that grid before laying on your second precut ply on top. The top and bottom plus the sides would be approx 1 1/2″ with a block added at lock height.

    Carpenter and Joiner

    Joiner ... a person who constructs the wooden components of a building, such as stairs, doors, and door and window frames.

    Carpenter ... cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork.

    1970 ... to present.

    #535070

    woodman_412
    Moderator

    A torsion box

    A torsion box I missed that part in framing class.

    Here’s a pic of the torsion box top when I was putting it together and a pic of my assembly table after it was done. Basically an MDF skin on each face and a grid in the middle. Makes for a super rigid and flat top.

    That torsion top brings back memories of before cheap imported doors flooded the market and big box stores edged out small supplies. I made a few ply flat panel doors using this method … the core of the door had a similar pattern to it, we would just cut up any old pine scraps run them to a uniform thickness (say 3/8’s) then set them approx 2″ apart on to your first sheet of ply then set out that grid before laying on your second precut ply on top. The top and bottom plus the sides would be approx 1 1/2″ with a block added at lock height.

    That would make a great door construction Mervyn. The torsion box type of construction works well for a lot of things where you need a lot of strength and stability but yet lighter weight. What thickness of ply did you use on the faces?

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #535085

    A torsion box

    A torsion box I missed that part in framing class.

    Here’s a pic of the torsion box top when I was putting it together and a pic of my assembly table after it was done. Basically an MDF skin on each face and a grid in the middle. Makes for a super rigid and flat top.

    That torsion top brings back memories of before cheap imported doors flooded the market and big box stores edged out small supplies. I made a few ply flat panel doors using this method … the core of the door had a similar pattern to it, we would just cut up any old pine scraps run them to a uniform thickness (say 3/8’s) then set them approx 2″ apart on to your first sheet of ply then set out that grid before laying on your second precut ply on top. The top and bottom plus the sides would be approx 1 1/2″ with a block added at lock height.

    That would make a great door construction Mervyn. The torsion box type of construction works well for a lot of things where you need a lot of strength and stability but yet lighter weight. What thickness of ply did you use on the faces?

    Depended on where it was going … often if it was just a domestic door for a home, we would use 3 ply sapele with sapele edges applied or if a paint finish it would just be a plain good-one-side 3 ply. If it was say a door for heavier use the ply would go up to 1/4 thick. We would get called to pubs & restaurants often to replace cheap store imports with the managers complaining that the local yobs would just punch those doors and put their fists through them … we made our doors like this and those managers were “as pleased as punch” (pun intended) No call backs to replace doors. The down side to that was the local hospital had a run of hand injuries come in … no one ever knew the cause … lol.

    True story … my X-wife was the X-ray tech (radiographer)

    Carpenter and Joiner

    Joiner ... a person who constructs the wooden components of a building, such as stairs, doors, and door and window frames.

    Carpenter ... cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork.

    1970 ... to present.

    #535091

    woodman_412
    Moderator

    The down side to that was the local hospital had a run of hand injuries come in … no one ever knew the cause … lol.

    lol that’s funny. I guess it would teach them a lesson about trying to punch holes in doors. That’s a good thing to keep in mind though for projects that require a custom door that needs to be tougher to suit the application.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #535096

    The down side to that was the local hospital had a run of hand injuries come in … no one ever knew the cause … lol.

    lol that’s funny. I guess it would teach them a lesson about trying to punch holes in doors. That’s a good thing to keep in mind though for projects that require a custom door that needs to be tougher to suit the application.

    I looked for some online photos … but no-one seems to have done a door like that.

    Carpenter and Joiner

    Joiner ... a person who constructs the wooden components of a building, such as stairs, doors, and door and window frames.

    Carpenter ... cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork.

    1970 ... to present.

    #716069

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Why you are making, Why you are not buying from online or local stores. In fact, you will see varieties of a standing desk on an online store and its a better way to save your time.

    Man the spam is getting thick lately,, @chadm

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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