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Let's talk silicone…

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 40 total)
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  • #80067
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    This is great information. I’m gonna check the composition of the ones I usually use.
    For general purpose caulking/adhesive, I prefer Loctite’s Polyseamseal. It’s always been reliable for me. I have used GE I and II if Polyseamseal’s not available.
    Regardless of what brand I use, I always check the label to make sure the product is right for my application. For paint prep, I use Alex. For kitchens and bathrooms, I make sure to use the kitchen/bath stuff – never the general purpose silicone because I prefer the mold resistant caulking. For windows, doors, concrete, walls etc. I get the application specific product. And, then there’s the waterproof versus the water-resistant aspect that I watch for. I use general purpose silicone for things like flooring, repairs, or other non-specific jobs that come up that don’t require mold protection, waterproofing or tight bond.

    Pat

    #80078
    Moze
    Moderator
    Dallas, TX

    Just curious, I know that silicone makes a pretty good adhesive but is there a reason you use it over a product like an epoxy or polyurethane based adhesive?

    Silicone is pretty much the industry standard when it comes to installing signs. It’s not uncommon for the use of silicone to be called out for on installation specs. It’s flexible, so it allows for contraction and expansion of the sign material and the material it’s attached to in pretty extreme temperatures.

    I’m sure there are other adhesives and sealants out there that work just as well, but I guess for the price and performance, silicone is just the way to go.

    Moze, Lexel is a great product and I have seen great reviews on it but I think the price is about double what the GE priducts would be. Way back when I worked at a lumber yard, it was double most other caulks.

    Exactly. I’ve heard rave reviews about it, and if you’re in a bind where you have to install something and the surface is still wet, I think Lexel can be used. But it’s definitely not something I’d use for everyday installations.

    I haven’t really paid much attention to which silicone I use because until this thread I thought silicone was silicone. I had noticed that some tubes were much smellier than others. I just wrote it off to brand differences because I had not ever paid attention. Now I know how to control that if I need to and lots of places I need to.

    If you see “acetoxy” or a longer word that includes the word “acetoxy”, that’s the acid curing silicone and that’s the one that has the strong ammonia smell.

    Great information guys. It will help when buying silicone in the future. Moze, I had a add a piece of trim in a place where I could not nail. A friend recommended silicone and it worked great. He uses it all the time for adhesive.

    Yeah, it’s great stuff!

    Resident Sign Guy

    #80167
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Gee whiz, I wonder if you guys are talking about something different than I’ve ever used. It’s ok for some stuff but I’ve never had good luck with it like for a surface sealant, and it sucks for around the tub. I’ve found after a while the only thing it sticks to is itself LOL. I’ve tried to use it in Marine applications and forget it. I’ve had pretty good luck with the gasket sealer though but only if you do it right. I think the difference is the clamping force. I used the adhesive to glue a couple little pieces of plywood together once but I put them in a vise for a day. That worked pretty good. My favorite now is made by 3M called 5200. It’s a marine ‘under the water line grade’ adhesive sealant. Absolutely 100 times better than any silicone I’ve ever used, The bad thing is it takes a full 7 days to cure LOL. Yeah it takes 24 hrs to ‘skin’, I’ve heard they make a faster set version but I’ve never tried it. It’s expensive too. JMHO

    #80168
    Calidecks64
    Pro
    Anaheim Hills, Cali

    That’s great info more, I would’ve never thought there was a difference either. I know you can mix paint into some stuff, but I don’t think it can be done with Silicone.

    #394837
    Moze
    Moderator
    Dallas, TX

    This is an older thread, but wanted to update it with my thoughts on Lexel, since I’ve been using it for a while.

    I believe I’ve posted about it elsewhere on the forum, but I actually came across this thread when I did a Google search.

    Anyway, the primary appeal of Lexel for me is when I’m installing acrylic or polycarbonate. The Lexel actually etches and forms a really high bond with those materials. It’s pretty impressive. A bit more expensive at $8 a tube, but for those jobs where you need that piece of mind, it’s my go-to.

    The attached letters were stud-mounted 1/2″ acrylic. Also used Lexel to ensure they don’t go anywhere.

    Attachments:

    Resident Sign Guy

    #394934
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    @Moze,
    ThanX for resurrecting this thread.

    I am in the beginning stages of re doing the caulk in my shower stall (been there 8 years) and was getting ready to research a better product to the GE II Kitchen & Bath Silicone.

    I am sure that is what I used (clear) and it has gone yellow and in a couple of spots has started to show mold and mildew.

    The only thing I hate when re doing caulk is the removal of old and making sure that all silicone residue has been removed. I know that a high % alcohol will do the trick.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #394942
    Moze
    Moderator
    Dallas, TX

    The one downside to Lexel is it can be a bit stringy. Wetting your finger to smooth the bead seems to help.

    Resident Sign Guy

    #394961
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    I’m glad you revived this thread.

    Do you need a sealant or an adhesive?

    I was about to reply saying that when I made it to that post. 🙂

    It seems that I’ve seen charts on the tube (too tiny for me to read) or in stores that describe the sealant and adherence qualities of each type.

    If I remember correctly, at least some of your work also involves bolts or studs on the letters. They would significantly relieve the stress on a non-optimum adhesive and allow it to work or assist in sticking.

    Thanks for the lesson. I’m here to learn, and the timing was great.

    #394965
    Moze
    Moderator
    Dallas, TX

    Yeah, a lot of what I install has studs on the back so that definitely helps carry the weight. The Lexel or silicone are for good measure.

    Resident Sign Guy

    #394975
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Depends on the surface the GE silicone can be pretty damn sticky, found it out the hard way.

    #395028

    Hey @Moze,

    We buy silicone from here. It is good priced stuff. We have had good luck with it. Maybe give them a call and see if they would send you a tube or two to try.

    http://www.inland-inc.com/

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #395038
    Moze
    Moderator
    Dallas, TX

    Thanks @overanalyze

    What are their prices like (if they’re on the site, I’m not seeing them).

    Resident Sign Guy

    #395047

    Thanks @overanalyze

    What are their prices like (if they’re on the site, I’m not seeing them).

    It has been a year or so since we bought from them…I think around $3-4 a tube. Buying more saves on shipping. We bought a few cases of a couple different colors.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #395049
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have always used mostly Phenoseal for my caulking needs, in my trade, as I like its bonding properties. I do use the GE some, too. I’ll have to read through this thread, as there’s probably something better.

    #395080
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    Lexel is wonderfull stuff. Even to repair hip waiders.

    I thought I read some where that GE 11 lost it’s cureability after a time.

    One project I worked on the counter top guys had silicone peeling off many top to splash joints. The owner asked me to fix it. I could get my knife under a loose edge and pull up the whole thing in one piece.

    So I cleaned every thing well with a scraper then wiped it with vinegar. Taped the joint, applied the tranclucent silicone and used a finger wet with vinegar. pulled the tape and it turned out very well. Owner was happy.

    #395165
    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    I have always used mostly Phenoseal for my caulking needs, in my trade, as I like its bonding properties. I do use the GE some, too. I’ll have to read through this thread, as there’s probably something better.

    I just wanted to point out that Phenoseal is a VINYL product, not silicone. I like it a lot and keep a lot in the van but it’s got a different function than silicone. Personally, I typically use GE II or Lexel for silicone applications depending on the application.

    Some of the posts I’ve read on here suggest that folks should make sure to clean the surface before applying silicone and use rubbing alcohol for smoothing and/or removal. It doesn’t last forever so wet locations should have the silicone removed and replaced every 10 years or so.

    #395183
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Before I go into this too far, I’m curious if anyone knows where I might be going with this.

    Man you got me there, I was thinking my barber???

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #395302
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I have always used mostly Phenoseal for my caulking needs, in my trade, as I like its bonding properties. I do use the GE some, too. I’ll have to read through this thread, as there’s probably something better.

    I just wanted to point out that Phenoseal is a VINYL product, not silicone. I like it a lot and keep a lot in the van but it’s got a different function than silicone. Personally, I typically use GE II or Lexel for silicone applications depending on the application.

    Some of the posts I’ve read on here suggest that folks should make sure to clean the surface before applying silicone and use rubbing alcohol for smoothing and/or removal. It doesn’t last forever so wet locations should have the silicone removed and replaced every 10 years or so.

    Great point Ethan. A clean surface when using silicone is required. Visually clean just isn’t good enough some times…a quick wipe with an alcohol wipe(yes I keep them…) does the trick.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #395303

    Yes alcohol or laquer thinner on the surfaces before you caulk will definitely improve adhesion. You want to avoid mineral spirits as that would leave a slight oily residue behind.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #395407
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    you have to keep an eye on paintability

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