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Leak proof alkaline batteries

This topic contains 14 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  CB 4 weeks, 1 day ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #726948

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    For those who keep their tools in their work vehicle 24/7, subjecting their tools to extreme heat and cold, I am sure you have dealt with leaked AA or AAA batteries inside your flashlights, stud finders, miltimeters, voltage testers, continuity probes, laser measures etc…

    I noticed Amazon has “leak proof” batteries made by Anker, I wonder if that solves this problem?

    #726967

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    For those who keep their tools in their work vehicle 24/7, subjecting their tools to extreme heat and cold, I am sure you have dealt with leaked AA or AAA batteries inside your flashlight ls, stud finders, millimeters, voltage testers, continuity probes, laser measures etc…

    I noticed Amazon has “leak proof” batteries made by Anker, I wonder if that solves this problem?

    I do buy some batteries from Amazon. I can’t say I have seen the leak proof ones before.
    If they say they are leak proof then should solve the problem.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #726974

    CB
    Pro

    For those who keep their tools in their work vehicle 24/7, subjecting their tools to extreme heat and cold, I am sure you have dealt with leaked AA or AAA batteries inside your flashlight ls, stud finders, millimeters, voltage testers, continuity probes, laser measures etc…

    I noticed Amazon has “leak proof” batteries made by Anker, I wonder if that solves this problem?

    Any type of alkaline chemistry battery, regardless of brand or price, will not store as well or as long, especially in the thermal gradients of inside an outdoor 24/7 vehicle, as a lithium iron disulfide battery.

    So why not just get lithium batteries? They don’t leak. They have a 20 YEAR shelf life. By comparison, the Anker Alkaline PowerLocks only have a 10 year shelf life.

    Lithium batteries also perform better, compared to alkaline.

    The Energizer Ultimate Lithium batteries hold the Guiness World Record as being the longest lasting AA batteries.

    Energizer makes AA, AAA, and 9 Volt sized batteries with Lithium Iron Disulfide chemistry. They can be identified at any store by their all silver appearance, blue packaging, and higher price tag.

    But that price is worth it, compared to cleaning battery acid corrosion out of my expensive Fluke meters and small lasers.

    #726975

    Doobie
    Pro

    I remember seeing some batteries like that in some stores years ago, but they were brutally expensive at the time.

    I mostly buy mine at Costco. Kirkland brand whenever I can.

    #727019

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    For those who keep their tools in their work vehicle 24/7, subjecting their tools to extreme heat and cold, I am sure you have dealt with leaked AA or AAA batteries inside your flashlight ls, stud finders, millimeters, voltage testers, continuity probes, laser measures etc…

    I noticed Amazon has “leak proof” batteries made by Anker, I wonder if that solves this problem?

    Any type of alkaline chemistry battery, regardless of brand or price, will not store as well or as long, especially in the thermal gradients of inside an outdoor 24/7 vehicle, as a lithium iron disulfide battery.

    So why not just get lithium batteries? They don’t leak. They have a <strong class=”d4pbbc-bold”>20 YEAR shelf life. By comparison, the Anker Alkaline PowerLocks only have a 10 year shelf life.

    Lithium batteries also perform better, compared to alkaline.

    The Energizer Ultimate Lithium batteries hold the Guiness World Record as being the longest lasting AA batteries.

    Energizer makes AA, AAA, and 9 Volt sized batteries with Lithium Iron Disulfide chemistry. They can be identified at any store by their all silver appearance, blue packaging, and higher price tag.

    But that price is worth it, compared to cleaning battery acid corrosion out of my expensive Fluke meters and small lasers.

    Would they be okay to use in smoke detectors ? Especially since they sound like they would last much longer

    #727029

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    For some reason I am not aware of the lithium ion AA/AAA batteries.

    I for the most part have been using Sanyo’s Eneloop rechargeable AA and AAA NiMH batteries because they seem to leak much less than those I experienced before.

    But sometimes rechargeables can be a pain compared to throwaways. I will have to look at these lithium ion ones. Thanks CB.

    #727034

    Doobie
    Pro

    But sometimes rechargeables can be a pain compared to throwaways.

    That’s basically why I have avoided them in the past. Even when my kid had toys that gobbled batteries, I still preferred to use the disposable alkaline Kirkland batteries. I don’t mind power tool batteries, but little traditional batteries….they’ve got to be largely user easy friendly.

    #727045

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Would they be okay to use in smoke detectors ? Especially since they sound like they would last much longer

    I am sure you could but smoke or fire alarms would be one device that I wouldn’t mind changing annually, especially since they need to be periodically tested anyways, and you get an audible warning when low. My laser measure and stud finder don’t beep to remind me when low.

    #727050

    CB
    Pro

    Would they be okay to use in smoke detectors ? Especially since they sound like they would last much longer

    I am sure you could but smoke or fire alarms would be one device that I wouldn’t mind changing annually, especially since they need to be periodically tested anyways, and you get an audible warning when low. My laser measure and stud finder don’t beep to remind me when low.

    How long has it been since you guys have installed smoke detectors?

    Around here, that is just about the only guaranteed thing that every inspector will roam around looking for… sometimes, unfortunately, because they don’t really know what to look for related to the work they were called out to inspect, and in order to appear competent and useful in their job, have to look at something, so up their heads and eyes turn scanning all the ceilings. I always smile inside when I see their heads turn upward. That means guaranteed pass, because they couldn’t find anything to whine about with the work. And of course I already made sure that smoke and CO detectors were in place and in working order before I called them.

    Anyway, I buy smoke detectors by the case, and they haven’t had replaceable batteries in years. No place for a battery. They are a 10 year product and then that’s it, the entire unit gets replaced. Adding more plastic and pcb boards to the landfill. By the millions.

    Guaranteed the built in, non replaceable battery inside of them is NOT Alkaline.

    #727052

    CB
    Pro

    For some reason I am not aware of the lithium ion AA/AAA batteries.

    I for the most part have been using Sanyo’s Eneloop rechargeable AA and AAA NiMH batteries because they seem to leak much less than those I experienced before.

    But sometimes rechargeables can be a pain compared to throwaways. I will have to look at these lithium ion ones. Thanks CB.

    Just know that I didn’t say lithium ion… I said lithium iron.

    There is a difference… and runaway heat leading to risk of fire is one of the differences. Some lithium ion batteries have that problem. Lithium iron batteries do not.

    Sanyo sold their EneLoop battery business to Panasonic. Those are great, cost effective batteries also. I have a couple dozen of them. They don’t leak either… or at least, have never leaked on me. But they do not last as long in dormancy as do the Energizer Lithium Ultimate lithium iron disulfide batteries.

    Plus, the Energizer batteries are significantly lighter in weight, which is nice for LED headlamps.

    #727053

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I replace all the smoke & fire alarms at my rentals when I purchased the property, and also buy them by the case. If one of them acts up, I replace all the alarms at all the rentals at the same time. Last time I did it was in 2017.

    The ones I bought were still equipped with replaceable 9v batteries. Once you get the alarm wired, you open the battery door, pull the plastic tab off for the backup battery.

    Most of the time I have a bad alarm when someone doing drywall sanding did not cover/protect/remove the alarm while sanding.

    #727095

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Would they be okay to use in smoke detectors ? Especially since they sound like they would last much longer

    I am sure you could but smoke or fire alarms would be one device that I wouldn’t mind changing annually, especially since they need to be periodically tested anyways, and you get an audible warning when low. My laser measure and stud finder don’t beep to remind me when low.

    How long has it been since you guys have installed smoke detectors?

    Around here, that is just about the only guaranteed thing that every inspector will roam around looking for… sometimes, unfortunately, because they don’t really know what to look for related to the work they were called out to inspect, and in order to appear competent and useful in their job, have to look at something, so up their heads and eyes turn scanning all the ceilings. I always smile inside when I see their heads turn upward. That means guaranteed pass, because they couldn’t find anything to whine about with the work. And of course I already made sure that smoke and CO detectors were in place and in working order before I called them.

    Anyway, I buy smoke detectors by the case, and they haven’t had replaceable batteries in years. No place for a battery. They are a 10 year product and then that’s it, the entire unit gets replaced. Adding more plastic and pcb boards to the landfill. By the millions.

    Guaranteed the built in, non replaceable battery inside of them is NOT Alkaline.

    Here every new house built has to have them 1 for each floor , they are hardwired and the one on the main floor also has a battery backup
    I actually just installed a few in my garage a few years ago
    I changed the batteries every daylight savings time
    I have around 9 battery operated , plus the 3 hardwired when the house was built , plus a carbon monoxide detector also hardwired
    And I bought a carbon monoxide detector to have close to the fireplace , funny , it just went into warning mode last week , it’s been 10 years.

    I’ll have to check into the batteries you mentioned. Especially for my keyless garage door keypad, that being outside year round , really eats up batteries.

    #727159

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    For some reason I am not aware of the lithium ion AA/AAA batteries.

    I just purchased some EverReady AAA and AA lithium batteries. Looking for something that does not leak when left in electronic equipment. Hoping this does the trick. Anybody have any experience with them?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #727217

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    For some reason I am not aware of the lithium ion AA/AAA batteries.

    I just purchased some EverReady AAA and AA lithium batteries. Looking for something that does not leak when left in electronic equipment. Hoping this does the trick. Anybody have any experience with them?

    CB in the third post up top provided some good info on it. 20 year shelf life is quite a bit. So it’s going to out live me LOL.

    #727391

    CB
    Pro

    20 years is shelf life. Obviously the longevity will reduce as stored energy is withdrawn from the battery. So as long as you make use of the batteries, you are likely to outlive them. The nice thing is, you won’t have to clean up after them.

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