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Keeping batteries inside your truck/van

This topic contains 26 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  CB 1 year, 1 month ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 21 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #681720

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Do you guys put a date on your batteries so you know how old they are?

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #684467

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I don’t date the batteries or tools.

    I do keep an electronic record of them. The purchase receipt (in case of warranty) has the date and the corresponding serial number. So if I need to find out I could but nothing on the actual tool or battery itself.

    #684471

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Do you guys put a date on your batteries so you know how old they are?

    I usually do, this way I know approximately how long I’ve had them,

    I do a mix of both, leaving them in the car / truck, and bring them in, all depends on the weather,
    In Quebec the winter months can get really cold, my old ni-cad never had any issues what so ever with cold and heat,
    But I have been issues with the lithium, in the cold, they just need to warm up a little, then it’s okay. Once or twice, my little lithium ratchet has just stopped working when left in the sun, guess that is the overheating protection

    #684522

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Do you guys put a date on your batteries so you know how old they are?

    I usually do, this way I know approximately how long I’ve had them,

    I do a mix of both, leaving them in the car / truck, and bring them in, all depends on the weather,
    In Quebec the winter months can get really cold, my old ni-cad never had any issues what so ever with cold and heat,
    But I have been issues with the lithium, in the cold, they just need to warm up a little, then it’s okay. Once or twice, my little lithium ratchet has just stopped working when left in the sun, guess that is the overheating protection

    I’ve never had to worry about the cold here hurting the batteries.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #684523

    CB
    Pro

    I worry about the heat, especially in an all black (read:oven) service body.

    #684568

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Do you guys put a date on your batteries so you know how old they are?

    I usually do, this way I know approximately how long I’ve had them,

    I do a mix of both, leaving them in the car / truck, and bring them in, all depends on the weather,
    In Quebec the winter months can get really cold, my old ni-cad never had any issues what so ever with cold and heat,
    But I have been issues with the lithium, in the cold, they just need to warm up a little, then it’s okay. Once or twice, my little lithium ratchet has just stopped working when left in the sun, guess that is the overheating protection

    I’ve never had to worry about the cold here hurting the batteries.

    Haha, unless you accidentally forget them in the freezer while getting ice for the scotch lol

    I know that one thing lithium batteries do not like is heat, have you ever had any issues with that DirtyWhiteBoy

    #685433

    CB
    Pro

    I used to know by the label design or the manufacturing code how old the batteries are. I didn’t write my own dates on the batteries, because what date would I write? The date I bought the battery?

    That would assume that the store I got the battery from sold me fresh stock. Which assumes that the distributer that supplied the store sold shipped them fresh stock. Which assumes that the wholesaler who supplied the distributer shipped them fresh stock. Which would assume that the shipping container that the batteries come from gets depleted and replenished at a regular rate.

    For all I know, the battery I bought in 2006 came from the same manufacturing run as the battery I bought in 2004, because people stopped buying those batteries en masse in 2000, because that battery system was relatively underpowered, obsolete, and replaced in 1998.

    So my purchase date has very little to do with the actual age of the battery. And since I grab whatever battery that is charged and handily available when I’m working… I can’t really tell how many cycles any given battery of mine has endured, rendering that method of aging a battery moot as well.

    I do mark poorly performing batteries, so I know not to expect a full pull from those units if I happen to get stuck using them out of desperation.

    It would be kind of nice if manufacturers didn’t codify and/or encrypt the manufacturing date of the batteries in cleverly disguised notation.

    And it also would be nice if there were a cycle counter built into the chip inside the battery, where if the voltage was depleted below 50% of charge (or whatever the fully discharged percentage is to be, which might be chemistry dependent), the chip would increment a counter, and that counter would accumulate over the life of the battery, so that a user would know and understand how much life that battery has remaining.

    Several patents on this idea have been filed, some are expired due to non payment of a maintenance fee, some are timed out, and some are set to time out in a couple of years. Seems like an obviously useful idea, no doubt held hostage by greed and the patent system.

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