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JS260 shaft orientation

This topic contains 51 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  DirtyWhiteBoy 2 years, 12 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 41 through 52 (of 52 total)
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  • #556782

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The plywood is full of glues and causes a lot of friction and heat. I would wax the blade to reduce the friction and heat.
    I use paraffin wax I buy in the hardware store.

    I have waxed my hand tools, I guess I should apply the same to some of my power tool blades as well, thanks!

    I was taught this by an old Japanese carpenter that lined me out on production framing when I got here in ’87. Senpai Toku.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #556839

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I was taught this by an old Japanese carpenter that lined me out on production framing when I got here in ’87. Senpai Toku.

    Them old guys know, lots of experience. Guess I’ll start waxing my blades.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #556958

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It’s the excessive heat build up that also dulls the blade. A dull hot blade is not a good blade.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #556962

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    When I drill thick metal I have a cup of water (with some ice if I have them) next to me that I can dip the drill bit every so often. Never tried with jigsaw but could help if heat is a major concern.

    #556966

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    When I drill thick metal I have a cup of water (with some ice if I have them) next to me that I can dip the drill bit every so often. Never tried with jigsaw but could help if heat is a major concern.

    I do that too, usually when I’m drilling a bunch of holes with a spade bit. I know it’s good to cool the blade, but I keep thinking that water, specifically, might also make the problem worse since wet wood is much harder on blades to deal with…and I keep thinking that maybe an oil/ wax would be better. I’ve never tried cooling my jigsaw blade, but then, I never use it for all that long either.

    Charlie
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    #556967

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    @cmeyer25

    That’s a pretty rough cut with the T234X, I’ve had good luck with decently clean cuts with it but I consider it one of the more flexible Bosch blades I have. The cut is square to the surface right?

    Curious question: What setting are you running your jigsaw at? I’ve had good luck using my Mafell with various blades at reduced speeds instead of running it at max. You might have better luck if you use the speed limiter on the JS260 something between 3 to 4 and reducing your feed rate to keep the chipload the same.

    Edit: This might be better advice
    If you have some scrap of similar material, make some cuts about 1-3 inches deep and try doing this:
    Put the other T234X blade in that you haven’t used yet

    Orbit set to 0
    Speed 3
    Stop the cut
    New cut at speed 4

    Orbit set to 1
    Speed 3
    Stop the cut
    New cut at Speed 4

    Orbit set to 2
    Speed 3
    Stop the cut
    New cut at Speed 4

    If you do this you might find the “sweet spot” of speeds and feeds for your JS260 with the T234X. Just keep that down in your notes for that ply. I found that changing species of softwood will change the speeds and feeds for specific Bosch blades when I am using them in my Mafell to get extremely clean cuts.

    That would be an interesting test to run, but then I think I’d need to do that again and again for any new type of material and blade too, and it could get cumbersome when I rarely use that tool. I agree though, there is probably a sweet spot that I’m not quite in – and I never mess with the speed setting, so that is something to keep in mind. Thanks for the advice!

    Charlie
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    #556971

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Never tried with jigsaw but could help if heat is a major concern.

    No,, when the wood is wet it increases the friction and heat. It needs to be waxed.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #556983

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    When I drill thick metal I have a cup of water (with some ice if I have them) next to me that I can dip the drill bit every so often. Never tried with jigsaw but could help if heat is a major concern.

    I do that too, usually when I’m drilling a bunch of holes with a spade bit. I know it’s good to cool the blade, but I keep thinking that water, specifically, might also make the problem worse since wet wood is much harder on blades to deal with…and I keep thinking that maybe an oil/ wax would be better. I’ve never tried cooling my jigsaw blade, but then, I never use it for all that long either.

    Run the tool at full speed in the air for a few seconds dry the bit pretty well. I wouldn’t use oil on wood though, it seeps in and could cause problem with glue/stain later on.

    #556989

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    Never tried with jigsaw but could help if heat is a major concern.

    No,, when the wood is wet it increases the friction and heat. It needs to be waxed.

    That’s what I thought.

    When I drill thick metal I have a cup of water (with some ice if I have them) next to me that I can dip the drill bit every so often. Never tried with jigsaw but could help if heat is a major concern.

    I do that too, usually when I’m drilling a bunch of holes with a spade bit. I know it’s good to cool the blade, but I keep thinking that water, specifically, might also make the problem worse since wet wood is much harder on blades to deal with…and I keep thinking that maybe an oil/ wax would be better. I’ve never tried cooling my jigsaw blade, but then, I never use it for all that long either.

    Run the tool at full speed in the air for a few seconds dry the bit pretty well. I wouldn’t use oil on wood though, it seeps in and could cause problem with glue/stain later on.

    I do that, but I don’t know if I’m just letting the bit heat up too much between coolings, but it seems like it gums up a lot more after cooling in water. I am curious about how an oil migh affect the performance. Especially if it mostly burns away as its being used. I’m not typically gluing to the surface I’m drilling through, (in the instances I’m talking about, I’m usually countersinking 2″ into a 2×4 so my 2 1/2″ screws will grab through them width wise into a butted rail for my beds) so the glued surface isn’t coming in contact with the oiled surface, and it shouldn’t be visible either…so maybe that’ll be something I try.

    Charlie
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    #557022

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    For wood I would think it would burn about the same time as oil, but if as you said there’s no plan to finish that area it shouldn’t be a problem. Although wax is probably a better idea since it’s not absorbed by wood and will stay to lubricate.

    #557668

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    For wood I would think it would burn about the same time as oil, but if as you said there’s no plan to finish that area it shouldn’t be a problem. Although wax is probably a better idea since it’s not absorbed by wood and will stay to lubricate.

    What kind of wax would you use?

    Charlie
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    #557669

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The parafin wax when warm turns to liquid and is absorbed be the metal blade as well as the wood.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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