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jobsite interior trim cut station setups

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  • #601652
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    The setup of a Finish Carpentery jobsite cut station

    When it comes to Trimming either a house or even in multi unit buildings a proper work station is pivotal for efficiency, nothing kills production more than a disorganized setup and scattered material storage. Whether is one carpenter or a crew of 10, the first and foremost important thing is to set up the station so that your not tripping over the materials while working on a tool, and move around the area carrying sheet goods while not knocking into tools or walls.

    Typical tools and setup layout

    Depending on the scope of a trim package, the tools required can be much more extensive as a more detailed trim design can require specialty fasteners or even hidden fasteners both of which need specialized tools.

    Sliding compound mitre saw the mitre saw is the primary workhorse used for cutting moldings and flat stock up to 13” wide. Either 10 “ or a 12” saw are preferred because of cut capacity. First and foremost you will be working with longer trim materials ranging from 12′ up to 18′ depending on what is offered by local suppliers. its best to set up the mtire saw in the longest room possible along the wall to maximize outfeed on either side and to still maintain floor space if in a house, for those working in buildings ive found having the saw out in the main hall of each floor works best so two installers can use the same saw in units on opposite sides of the hall. If your going to have more than 3 people installing trim at the same time you should have one saw for every two guys

    Mitre saw stands
    No matter what make of mitre saw your using a proper stand is pivotal. Having the saw elevated allows for less user fatigue eliminating cutting on the floor, along with allowing for better line of sight of the cut line along with supporting the materials. Both site built stands or portable stands work well, the site built ones are often heavy and clunky best suited for longer periods of cutting such as in a building where as the portable ones offer light weight compact designs suited for setting up and tearing down daily

    Table saws
    The second most important tool on a trim install is the table saw. For site use a contractor saw is your best bet, pretty much all the companies have the standard size contractor saw which provide up to 25” rip capacity for sheet goods while Bosch, Dewalt and Rigid have their more compact models . Similar to the mitre saw, when locating the table saw you should have as much space as possible around it to allow for easy maneuvering of materials around it, front to back and to the side. 3 or 4 feet on the left side to allow for sheet goods and up to 12′ both front and back for feeding and outfeed of longer materials. If you are going to be doing quite a bit of ripping of materials in order to mill up

    Assembly Table / Outfeed table

    In conjuction with the table saw an outfeed table is pivotal, it will provide material support when ripping stock on the table saw and then be used as a work table for edge sanding, routing along with assembly of pre built trim pieces or small site built cabinets. The simplest outfeed table can be a sheet of plywood set on two sawhorses at the same height as the table saw or slightly lower. More eleborate tables can be built which have multiple shelves or even drawers to allow for storaage of smaller tools or fasteners. The MFT built by Dan Pattison is one such design or the Paulk workbench. A secondary work table can be set up but is best to be kept clear of the cutting stations. For those who will using a router quite a bit the table can be made into a router table as well with the use of mounting hardware to hold the router .

    Pneumatics These days no one hand nails trim, everything is installed using nail guns. For production reasons most guys are still using air nailers connected to a comprossor.

    Compressor The size compressor used will depend on how many installers are going to be connected to the compressor. Someone installing solo can get by on a 3 or 4 gallon single tank compressor, 2-4 installers will can use a 6 gallon twin tank outfitted with a hose splitter to provide exta outlets , 5 or more installers you can use either a 20 gallon compressor or have multiple twin tank compressors going. Either way your best bet is to not exceed running hoses more than 150 ft as there will be a noticable drop in air pressure at the tool resulting in protruding nails.

    Portable power tools Fasteners
    there is any number of portable tools that are needed , by preference I keep trim routers, jigsaw and a orbital sander and usually one cordless drill at the work table so they are in arms reach when needed.

    rthe variety of nail guns, trim are typically stored together in a box when not in use. I keep the corresponding nails in a small parts type tool box all together . the exact same is said for cordless drills and different trim screws. I like to keep this sort of thing off to the side of a room all together along with toolbags which hold hand tools

    Materials Storage

    As already mentioned the amount of materials that will be on site will vary based on the trim details thats spec’d on the plans. Either way your dealing with finished product so storing it in a manner which reduces damage is of utmost importance but it should also be located near the cut station to minimize time walking back and forth.

    – Prehung doors should be placed near the rough opening they will be going in , if doors are going to have site built jambs, its prefeable to keep them near the work station where your router and jig is located.. Doors should also be kept standing up

    -Casings, moldings and flat stock materials should all be near the saws but not obstruct moving around. Each should be kept grouped together seperately for easy access and laying flat so to eliminate warping. Keeping shorter offcuts next to the saw can make it easier to sort through when you need short pieces

    Final Words
    No matter how you set up there will always be space confinements depending on the site. Always try to keep the work area tidy and all garbage off cuts in cans which are emptied daily or atleast taken out of the area, dust control eithe rwith a dust extractor or atleast sweeping up or vacuuming will save your lungs. The other option is to set up outdoors if the weather permits, some crews will setup a canopy style shelter . But most importantly work smart, work safe and keep the mitres tight



    @bethepro

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #601666

    Thanks Jeff for sharing your trim knowledge on your trimming setup for the jobsite . What would say you can’t live without on site minus the miter saw , table saw .

    Always willing to learn .

    #601672

    Very interesting.

    I have heard that some guys still favour using a hand saw and miter box for quick in-place adjustment (not for all the cuts, they still have the big miter saw for that)

    Is that something you guys do?

    #601681
    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    Here is couple of my setup for trim and wood working stuff when im gonna stay at the jobsite for longtime i like taking the reaxx but for portability gts1031 is very light weight

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #601692
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    hand saw wise i carry a gomboy silky folding handsaw and a small irwin flush cut hand say.. 99% of the time door jambs and window boxes should be perfectly square when installed. if i do have to fuss with mitres its usually when replacing old casings to match the new within other new areas of the project. i can sometimes cheat the margin a just a hair by adjusting the trim to get the mitre tight

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #601697
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Very informative @jkirk . I have been debating on the portable miter saw stand. Right now I either set the saw on horses or on a folding table we haul around. I never leave my tools on a job so I have to load and unload every day. I’m sure the stand would be nice but just another thing to lug in every day. Any input?

    #601700
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    @roninohio i use to do the folding table thing.. and also worked for a guy that had a workmate he set his mitre saw on… i found the table was very limited for material support and the workmate was a major hazord… he was using it and the workmate collapses while cutting,, in the process he took off his thumb… then he switched to setting it across planks. the planks didnt provide enough support and the saw fell off a couple times breaking the saw… that was the point i decided im using my own mitre saw and a stand

    i thought i had some better photos of my trim gear setup but seems i deleted them.. i will get some new ones and update them when im back to work

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #601703
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I have a couple wood blocks I made the same height as the miter saw table that help. Not perfect. I like the saw stands but afraid to leave it on the jobs. May be a good thing if someone takes the folding table!

    #601714
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I have been repurposing some old doors that were destined for the dumpster. Set them up on horses and it is a great support for the track saw. Eventually, when they get kerfed up a lot, just trash it and start all over again.

    #601723
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I still use the basic DeWalt setup for cutting most of my trim work.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #601742

    @jkirk great information, thanks for taking the time to get all the details out for us,
    Some good info and helpful tips,

    #601760
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I still use the basic DeWalt setup for cutting most of my trim work.

    Nice and very effective. Like the weather shots too.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #601762
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    Great read. I like seeing everyone’s set ups aswell.

    I don’t have any pictures on hand but I when doing trim I use my 12 ” Dewalt on their version of a gravity stand, along with my 10″ Ridgid tablesaw on the TSUV.

    However that setup might be changing.

    #601863
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I still use the basic DeWalt setup for cutting most of my trim work.

    Nothing wrong with using the best table saw fence on the market!!

    Attachments:
    #601868

    I still use the basic DeWalt setup for cutting most of my trim work.

    Nothing wrong with using the best table saw fence on the market!!

    Those Sanglier stick around once the saw starts screaming?

    #601880
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I still use the basic DeWalt setup for cutting most of my trim work.

    Nothing wrong with using the best table saw fence on the market!!

    I have a couple of the Dewalt Stands that I have gotten with Saws. They are Great, lots of length for material support and very portable. I have tried others, but in the end, we use the Dewalts more than anything.

    #601881
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I still use the basic DeWalt setup for cutting most of my trim work.

    Nothing wrong with using the best table saw fence on the market!!

    It is a really nice fence system. I still like the DW780 miter saw a lot. Maybe even more than my glide in some ways.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #601884
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Do any professionals on here cope their trim? I do it on my own house, but I am not a professional trim installer. Just wondering if people find it time effective or if there’s another method.

    #601885
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Do any professionals on here cope their trim? I do it on my own house, but I am not a professional trim installer. Just wondering if people find it time effective or if there’s another method.

    I like to cope my inside corners,,,, I think I’ve gone off topic again

    https://bethepro.com/forums/topic/coping-baseboard/
    https://bethepro.com/forums/topic/coping-what-do-you-use/

    #601886
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Do any professionals on here cope their trim? I do it on my own house, but I am not a professional trim installer. Just wondering if people find it time effective or if there’s another method.

    I cope most of my trim work. Coping gives tighter fitting inside joints most of the time.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

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