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Job site pens and markers

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  • #682895
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I started this thread with a title of “who’s pen is the best?” but I don’t know if that will break any forum rule that would send me to a virtual jail so I rephrased it.

    So who makes the best, long lasting, non fading marking instrument on rough, dusty, dirty surfaces like concrete, plaster, stucco, that one can draw a line or mark a location with, that will stay at least a few days in the hot sun and rain?

    I have used various versions of sharpies, Milwaukee inkzall, regular carpenter pencils. What else is out there?

    #682899
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    In my shop I use various colours of chalk, pencils and markers depending on the material and the degree of precision required. I also us a utility knife and a marking knife, again, depending on precision required.

    Most rough marking is done with chalk or pencil.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #682916
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    We have had quite the discussion on the Inkzall.
    https://bethepro.com/forums/topic/milwaukee-inkzall-markers/

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #682927
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’ve wondered about the Pica Visor Marking Crayons on the bottom of this page at LV for some time.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=71121&cat=1,42935,42936,43509,71121

    Anybody ever try them? They’re not cheap and I can’t find them anywhere but at LV. They’re made in Germany.

    This one though, would be one I’d be most interested in…

    https://www.pica-marker.com/en/pen/pica-classic-590-pro-lumber-industrial-marking-crayon

    Problem is, I don’t think you can get them here in NA. Seems it can write on just about anything wet or dry.

    PICA has a lot of different cool marking pencils and markers.

    https://www.pica-marker.com/en/products-0#

    #682935
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I carry a carpenter pencil and a Inksall on me daily.

    #682945
    CB
    Spectator

    A scratch awl makes a more precise mark in wood than

    So who makes the best, long lasting, non fading marking instrument on rough, dusty, dirty surfaces like concrete, plaster, stucco, that one can draw a line or mark a location with, that will stay at least a few days in the hot sun and rain?

    I have used various versions of sharpies, Milwaukee inkzall, regular carpenter pencils. What else is out there?

    A scratch awl, scribe, soapstone, sharp pointed punch, utility knife… any or all of the foregoing instruments will meet your “rough, dusty, dirty surfaces like concrete, plaster, stucco, that will stay at least a few days in the hot sun and rain” requirements.

    I bought a bunch of Milwaukee Inkzalls. Once. The best thing I’ve noticed about them is how clever their product name is. Leveraging their stellar reputation with their class defining Sawzalls, by making an artful play on words with the name Inksall. Smart. Very smart. It worked, too. I bought them. But as marking pens, I’ve found better at the Dollar store.

    I had a small pile of Inkzalls ready to return to Home Depot… I just never got around to returning such a piddly group of items, and now that 90 days has passed, my loss. They are useless as marking pens. When I reach for a marker that I know will work, I reach around the Inkzalls to get to the Sharpies. Or a pencil. Plenty of carpenter’s pencils on hand, and a quck slice with a utility knife can shape and sharpen the lead for more precise marking if required.

    But the thinnest, most precise mark is a scratch, made by a sharp metal instrument. That scratch will last through sun and rain, dust and rough. Maybe even longer than you want it to.

    #683089
    Clev08
    Pro

    I have an Inkzall and a pencil but sometimes I use my utility knife to mark a cut line

    #683693
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I picked these two Pica ‘Visor’ Markers today. Been curious about them for some time and decided to buy a couple of them at LV today.

    #683704
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I usually just use a regular pencil . I got pretty used to using them in the cabinet shops. A carpenter pencil was never fine enough for precise marks. I am going to find a light color marker for the vinyl planks we have been using. I can’t see pencil lines on the dark color flooring.

    #732980

    Old thread warning

    I bought a pica dry marker pencil for the shop/plant
    Sometimes it is extremely helpful when we need to install or re fit load units that have been Incorporated from an ecr
    I liked it so much , that I bought another one for home use , plus I bought the kit for work with the added marker , plus the permanent white pen/marker
    I’ve been using them for a week
    I have to say , well worth it for my type of work

    #762087

    You can consider Sharpie permanent markers. These markers are designed for a variety of applications, including industrial use, so they can write on a variety of surfaces. The most amazing feature of these markers, however, is that they can write on wet or oily surfaces.

    #762089

    You can consider Sharpie permanent markers. These markers are designed for a variety of applications, including industrial use, so they can write on a variety of surfaces. The most amazing feature of these markers, however, is that they can write on wet or oily surfaces.

    Yes they are good , my only complaint is that they don’t last very long , plus it’s very hard to get and keep the tips pointy

    #762092
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    not sure if the Inkzall or the sharpie is best. I have used both and had similar results with both. The Inkzall looks a lot more professional with the red case and Milwaukee label, instead of something that was stolen from the office.

    Price wise I don’t think there is a great difference.

    #762109
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    You can consider Sharpie permanent markers. These markers are designed for a variety of applications, including industrial use, so they can write on a variety of surfaces. The most amazing feature of these markers, however, is that they can write on wet or oily surfaces.

    Yes they are good , my only complaint is that they don’t last very long , plus it’s very hard to get and keep the tips pointy

    I have agree with what you are saying. They don’t last very long. I use get a week out of Sharpie at work. We don’t use them any more not for those reasons. We have went to metal detectable markers.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #762114

    You can consider Sharpie permanent markers. These markers are designed for a variety of applications, including industrial use, so they can write on a variety of surfaces. The most amazing feature of these markers, however, is that they can write on wet or oily surfaces.

    Yes they are good , my only complaint is that they don’t last very long , plus it’s very hard to get and keep the tips pointy

    I have agree with what you are saying. They don’t last very long. I use get a week out of Sharpie at work. We don’t use them any more not for those reasons. We have went to metal detectable markers.

    That sounds interesting , I don’t think I’ve heard about those types, what is a metal detecting marker

    #762120
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    You can consider Sharpie permanent markers. These markers are designed for a variety of applications, including industrial use, so they can write on a variety of surfaces. The most amazing feature of these markers, however, is that they can write on wet or oily surfaces.

    Yes they are good , my only complaint is that they don’t last very long , plus it’s very hard to get and keep the tips pointy

    I have agree with what you are saying. They don’t last very long. I use get a week out of Sharpie at work. We don’t use them any more not for those reasons. We have went to metal detectable markers.

    That sounds interesting , I don’t think I’ve heard about those types, what is a metal detecting marker

    There is metal in the marker that can be detected by a metal detection device. This way if marker got lost in the product we make it can be found.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #762139

    You can consider Sharpie permanent markers. These markers are designed for a variety of applications, including industrial use, so they can write on a variety of surfaces. The most amazing feature of these markers, however, is that they can write on wet or oily surfaces.

    Yes they are good , my only complaint is that they don’t last very long , plus it’s very hard to get and keep the tips pointy

    I have agree with what you are saying. They don’t last very long. I use get a week out of Sharpie at work. We don’t use them any more not for those reasons. We have went to metal detectable markers.

    That sounds interesting , I don’t think I’ve heard about those types, what is a metal detecting marker

    There is metal in the marker that can be detected by a metal detection device. This way if marker got lost in the product we make it can be found.

    Ah okay , that makes sense , thanks for the information

    #762154
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I use Sharpie a lot.
    Different colors.

    #762177
    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    I’ve tried so many markers and pencils…. I’m a sucker for gimmicky things at the tool store.
    I even still have one of those pencils that was modeled after a utility knife…. Quick Draw I think.
    Anyways… I’ve settled on a few different ones (depending on the task). Pica marker for general carpentry work, a 6mm lead marker for strong layout lines, an awl for precise framing lines, an industrial Sharpie for the occasional permanent mark, and I still have a fine tip Inkzall for some reason.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #762183
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I’ve tried so many markers and pencils…. I’m a sucker for gimmicky things at the tool store.

    I even still have one of those pencils that was modeled after a utility knife…. Quick Draw I think.

    Anyways… I’ve settled on a few different ones (depending on the task). Pica marker for general carpentry work, a 6mm lead marker for strong layout lines, an awl for precise framing lines, an industrial Sharpie for the occasional permanent mark, and I still have a fine tip Inkzall for some reason.

    When I worked a woodworking shop making paddles we used pens to mark stuff out. I just went to the Dollar store and bought a package or 2 of pens. Then seem to work well for what we needed them for.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

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