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Jim's Watertone videos

Viewing 20 posts - 961 through 980 (of 999 total)
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  • #684531
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    Part 1B of my re edit of the long format video I did of milling the ash slabs for the top of my Roubo bench.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/9uCNPR1DLWw?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    great video JDO. good to hear and see something from you again.
    still snowing up north? man we already have triple digits (fahrenheit) yikes lol

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    Palm Springs, CA

    #684576

    still snowing up north?

    No snow here, that was older footage. I have been in the pool already (the water has been up to 80 F with no heater in it). Though the last few days have been cooler, still, not cold enough for snow…lol.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685158
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    @JimDaddyO, how long to you plan on drying the slabs before final milling?

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #685160

    @jimdaddyo, how long to you plan on drying the slabs before final milling?

    I have been at them already. They are almost to size. My inexperience is showing though. They are giving me a hard time.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685222
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    @jimdaddyo, how long to you plan on drying the slabs before final milling?

    I have been at them already. They are almost to size. My inexperience is showing though. They are giving me a hard time.

    I thought there was a rule of thumb 1 year for inch for air drying lumber. I thinking you slabs might dry alittle quicker do to the milling you have been doing. I also know ash can be burnt for firewood green as there isn’t much sap in the wood.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #685226

    I thought there was a rule of thumb 1 year for inch for air drying lumbe

    That is a good rule of thumb for furniture making though according to some of the research I have done work bench tops in the Roubo style were (are) often worked pretty green. The traditional double tenon joinery to the legs means that the mortises cut into the top will actually shrink around the legs tenons and tighten them up. An occasional planing over the next few years keeps everything flat.

    This makes sense to me in another way also. In the days of the journeyman joiner there was no way he would be travelling with a bench weighing several hundred pounds. It would not be a profitable to him to arrive at a location to set up shop, cut some wood for his work bench, and then wait several years to open his shop and begin work while the wood dries for his work bench. A more likely method would be to get the bench built as soon as possible, probably from fresh wood, and begin earning an income right away, then deal with any shrinkage as time goes on and as needed. Methods similarly used in post and beam (timber frame) construction and log homes. The bench wood would be similarly large wood.

    Most of this theory I have gleaned from the writing of Chris Schwarz, who has built probably more benches than anyone in the modern day. He has built benches from wood that was off the scale of what his moisture meter could read, and some of that wood had been cut and sitting for decades. Such is the nature of large timbers.

    I wish I could write short answers sometimes…lol.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685230
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I thought there was a rule of thumb 1 year for inch for air drying lumbe

    That is a good rule of thumb for furniture making though according to some of the research I have done work bench tops in the Roubo style were (are) often worked pretty green. The traditional double tenon joinery to the legs means that the mortises cut into the top will actually shrink around the legs tenons and tighten them up. An occasional planing over the next few years keeps everything flat.

    This makes sense to me in another way also. In the days of the journeyman joiner there was no way he would be travelling with a bench weighing several hundred pounds. It would not be a profitable to him to arrive at a location to set up shop, cut some wood for his work bench, and then wait several years to open his shop and begin work while the wood dries for his work bench. A more likely method would be to get the bench built as soon as possible, probably from fresh wood, and begin earning an income right away, then deal with any shrinkage as time goes on and as needed. Methods similarly used in post and beam (timber frame) construction and log homes. The bench wood would be similarly large wood.

    Most of this theory I have gleaned from the writing of Chris Schwarz, who has built probably more benches than anyone in the modern day. He has built benches from wood that was off the scale of what his moisture meter could read, and some of that wood had been cut and sitting for decades. Such is the nature of large timbers.

    I wish I could write short answers sometimes…lol.

    Wen you stop to think about it, that makes a lot of sense. Does that mean that you are looking more towards the split top to deal with wood movement in the future?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #685232
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    I thought there was a rule of thumb 1 year for inch for air drying lumbe

    That is a good rule of thumb for furniture making though according to some of the research I have done work bench tops in the Roubo style were (are) often worked pretty green. The traditional double tenon joinery to the legs means that the mortises cut into the top will actually shrink around the legs tenons and tighten them up. An occasional planing over the next few years keeps everything flat.

    This makes sense to me in another way also. In the days of the journeyman joiner there was no way he would be travelling with a bench weighing several hundred pounds. It would not be a profitable to him to arrive at a location to set up shop, cut some wood for his work bench, and then wait several years to open his shop and begin work while the wood dries for his work bench. A more likely method would be to get the bench built as soon as possible, probably from fresh wood, and begin earning an income right away, then deal with any shrinkage as time goes on and as needed. Methods similarly used in post and beam (timber frame) construction and log homes. The bench wood would be similarly large wood.

    Most of this theory I have gleaned from the writing of Chris Schwarz, who has built probably more benches than anyone in the modern day. He has built benches from wood that was off the scale of what his moisture meter could read, and some of that wood had been cut and sitting for decades. Such is the nature of large timbers.

    I wish I could write short answers sometimes…lol.

    I guess you are right. A work bench is far from fine furniture. What you say doesn’t make sense. I see what you mean about the legs go threw the top.

    I know very little about joinery really. I am still learning many things. Chris Schwarz has made alot of work benches for sure.

    Sometimes short answer are hard to get the point across.

    Honestly I am sure you will get it figure out and sounds like you have done some research.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #685235
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I have been at them already.They are giving me a hard time.

    I’m sure you’ll get it figured out. Good plan on using the wood before it fully dry.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #685256

    Does that mean that you are looking more towards the split top to deal with wood movement in the future?

    I am still sitting on the fence about that. I checked it yesterday and it looks so nice as a single top and the joint is fairly tight now. I will play with it and contemplate my options further.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685325
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Congrats, Jim, getting a great feature of your guitar stand on Matt’s weekly shop update.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #685327
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Great explanation that makes a lot of sense. I was mainly thinking about twisting/warping, but as you mention – an occasional planing of the top should take care of that.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #685329

    Congrats, Jim, getting a great feature of your guitar stand on Matt’s weekly shop update.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/AEwCYzuOWCE?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    Oh, I haven’t watched that one yet. Does this mean I’m famous?…lol

    Great explanation that makes a lot of sense. I was mainly thinking about twisting/warping, but as you mention – an occasional planing of the top should take care of that.

    I was looking at the slabs today. Both have a slight twist in them. If I twist one the joint looks nice but the top needs a lot of planing. If I twist the other instead, the top is really nice but the joint needs some tuning up. At this point I am thinking of working the joint, making the base to fit, and going with it. I just wish there were someone around that could look at it and I could bounce ideas off of…..Oh Peter! Got time for a coffee? @smallerstick !!

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685347
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Congrats, Jim, getting a great feature of your guitar stand on Matt’s weekly shop update.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/AEwCYzuOWCE?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    Oh, I haven’t watched that one yet. Does this mean I’m famous?…lol

    Great explanation that makes a lot of sense. I was mainly thinking about twisting/warping, but as you mention – an occasional planing of the top should take care of that.

    I was looking at the slabs today. Both have a slight twist in them. If I twist one the joint looks nice but the top needs a lot of planing. If I twist the other instead, the top is really nice but the joint needs some tuning up. At this point I am thinking of working the joint, making the base to fit, and going with it. I just wish there were someone around that could look at it and I could bounce ideas off of…..Oh Peter! Got time for a coffee? @smallerstick !!

    Well,maybe not famous yet, but Matt has 160K subs or so and maybe some of them will go your way too. Help get you to the magic 1,000.

    I think we do need to get together soon. Yeah, I have time for coffee.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #685357

    I think we do need to get together soon. Yeah, I have time for coffee.

    This forum needs a thumbs up button.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685359
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Congrats, Jim, getting a great feature of your guitar stand on Matt’s weekly shop update.

    Congrats JDO. Well done.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #685379
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Congrats, Jim, getting a great feature of your guitar stand on Matt’s weekly shop update.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/AEwCYzuOWCE?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    Congrats Jim! I made on there once. This may boost your YT channel.

    I just wish there were someone around that could look at it and I could bounce ideas off of…..Oh Peter! Got time for a coffee? @smallerstick !!

    This maybe just what you need. It always helps to bounce ideas off somebody.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #685415

    This week’s video brings me to fixing up my favourite set of wind chimes. They fell apart a couple of years ago so I re claimed some old fence boards, some string, a bit of time and a few knots to get the pleasant sounds in my yard again.

    The video is titled “The one where I show my Ding Dong”….not too much into click bait territory is it?

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #685468
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    JDO Thank you for posting the video. Enjoyed it.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #685470
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    This week’s video brings me to fixing up my favourite set of wind chimes. They fell apart a couple of years ago so I re claimed some old fence boards, some string, a bit of time and a few knots to get the pleasant sounds in my yard again.

    The video is titled “The one where I show my Ding Dong”….not too much into click bait territory is it?

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/-t-CyfRlksc?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    I almost thought you made these from scratch. Good job! It always nice when you can fix something. This is alot better then throwing them out.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

Viewing 20 posts - 961 through 980 (of 999 total)
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