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JAWS (2018)

This topic contains 11 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Miamicuse 3 months ago.

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  • #707468

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    So…one of my tenants kept a smaller 30 pound dog. I have no clue a smaller dog like this can dig a hole in the yard and rip up half a dozen sprinklers and chewed out sprinkler controller wires.

    I also have no clue that it can take the entire corner off an interior door.

    OK so I need to “fix” this.

    Normally, I would just rip the entire door out and replace with a brand new prehung door, BUT this is a tight corner at the end of the hallway, so the door casing didn’t fit, they had been trimmed on both sides to fit, and adjacent to it, there is another door also kind of butt up against it and it’s door casing were also trimmed to fit so the two casings were mitered at the corner. Also that room on the inside has a tight corner so the trim casing on the inside was also trimmed to fit. I worry that if I remove the door casing I might end up tearing into or damage the casing of the adjacent door around the corner and I would prefer to leave the casing and jamb alone.

    Replacing just the door slab is an option but I have to cut mortises for the hinges and locks.

    I wonder if an epoxy putty filler at the corner might be easier.

    What do you think? New door slab or patch it?

    #707482

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    What do you think? New door slab or patch it?

    I would just install a new door.

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    #707494

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    What do you think? New door slab or patch it?

    I’m with Alex, new door slab. Sounds like cutting mortises for hinges and locks would be easier than fiddling with all the trim.

    Not a very happy dog by the look of the door.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought stupid than to open your mouth and remove all traces of doubt.

    #707502

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    New door slab would be the answer.
    30$ ( maybe cheaper in US) for the slab, 10 minutes for the mortises and you have a new door.

    #707507

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    New door slab. Why spend the time trying to patch when a new slab is so much simpler?

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #707509

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    well, I just know it’s going to be a pain to find a matching slab somewhere. That hallway has three bedroom doors, a bathroom door, a closet door all next to each other, so if I get another slab and the pattern is similar but not quite the same, it is going to be very obvious one of them is “odd”. These are very common six panel doors, but each brand is slightly different, narrower here and taller there.

    So it’s going to take time to look for a match. I have to take into account to find the match.

    I will take another look next week. May be I can find another door in that house further sway from that hallway with a matching slab, transfer that slab to the broken one, then install another six panel there that may not be side by side with other similar doors.

    How can a small dog take such a big bite?

    #707518

    CB
    Pro

    I finally clicked on this thread.

    With a thread title like “JAWS (2018)”, I literally thought it was a talk around the jobsite movie review of a remake of Speilburg’s “JAWS” of 40 years ago.

    Where does the door lead to? A bedroom or a mud room / vestibule / laundry room? The hard tile throughout suggests something other than a bedroom, which opens up the opportunity for you to logically install a stainless steel toe plate over the bottom of the door to give the next doggie something a little more discouraging to chew on.

    #707530

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    logically install a stainless steel toe plate over the bottom of the door to give the next doggie something a little more discouraging to chew on.

    Stainless steel is expensive. Aluminum plate would do the same thing.
    Or get rid of the dog.

    #707567

    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    Square it up, patch in with wood, blend with auto body filler, sand, prime, paint, install kick plate.

    #707588

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    Square it up, patch in with wood, blend with auto body filler, sand, prime, paint, install kick plate.

    idk but perhaps it takes too much time trying to fix/patch up the existing door

    unless he gets paid by hour 😛

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    #707606

    I would also suggest the metal kickplate on either the repaired or replaced door to prevent this from becoming too common an occurrence.

    Will

    #707625

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I finally clicked on this thread.

    With a thread title like “JAWS (2018)”, I literally thought it was a talk around the jobsite movie review of a remake of Speilburg’s “JAWS” of 40 years ago.

    Yeah I made a misleading title because I think at that moment I was really thinking about the size of that bite then what I would need to do to fix this. I just could not believe how big that damage is compared to the size of that dog LOL.

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