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James Hardie Siding Discussion.

This topic contains 145 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by  Doobie 3 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 121 through 140 (of 146 total)
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  • #631543

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    ive used the makita fibre cement circ saw which has a dust shroud built into it and hooks up to a collector.. their a special order tool from tool dealers but it does work well.. the shears produce virtually no dust, but as they dull dont make hte cleanest cuts

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #631550

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    the shears produce virtually no dust, but as they dull dont make hte cleanest cuts

    I know there are cheapo shears that don’t last and is why I went with what seemed to me to be a quality brand/unit. The blade on the Bullet Tools shearer I got is probably close to a quarter inch thick and is rated for 10,000 cuts. It cuts everything I’ve fed it so far like a hot knife thru butter. I was even using it to cut one inch thick stacked roof shingles. It cuts thru no prob. Typically, tools that impress me have a plug and cord. This thing is the exception.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #631591

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The Hitachi jig saw blades are great for cutting arches and corners on cutouts of windows and the like. that said, if you are only doing one job, they are probably not necessary. you may tear up a couple of cheaper blades but they will work. if you have a lot of curves and arches, then I would go with the Hitachi fiber cement blade.

    Thanks Kurt.

    Kurt, I’ve been meaning to ask you something else somewhat related from a post a vaguely recall some months ago, but I can’t recall if it was yourself who posted it. I ‘think’ you had posted a pic of some kind of what looked like a premolded saddle for fixtures/mechanicals for siding installation. It looked white and was obviously designed to prevent water infiltration for where one has like an electrical outlet on an exterior wall. Was that you, and if so who makes them? I’ve asked at my BB stores about these and nobody knows what I’m asking about.

    Kevin, was it the Quick Flash product. I have always been impressed with them but never used them. I do remember a lineset flashing i thought was real neat and clean looking fot eh AC but I cannot remember who’s it was.

    http://www.quickflashproducts.com/products.html

    #631699

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    The Hitachi jig saw blades are great for cutting arches and corners on cutouts of windows and the like. that said, if you are only doing one job, they are probably not necessary. you may tear up a couple of cheaper blades but they will work. if you have a lot of curves and arches, then I would go with the Hitachi fiber cement blade.

    Thanks Kurt.

    Kurt, I’ve been meaning to ask you something else somewhat related from a post a vaguely recall some months ago, but I can’t recall if it was yourself who posted it. I ‘think’ you had posted a pic of some kind of what looked like a premolded saddle for fixtures/mechanicals for siding installation. It looked white and was obviously designed to prevent water infiltration for where one has like an electrical outlet on an exterior wall. Was that you, and if so who makes them? I’ve asked at my BB stores about these and nobody knows what I’m asking about.

    Kevin, was it the Quick Flash product. I have always been impressed with them but never used them. I do remember a lineset flashing i thought was real neat and clean looking fot eh AC but I cannot remember who’s it was.

    http://www.quickflashproducts.com/products.html

    No that’s not it Kurt. Maybe what I saw posted was a self made white pvc one. It looked manufactured and I should have bookmarked it when I saw it posted. I just looked all over online at websites and image Google galleries and I cannot find anything like I saw. Maybe it was Jeff who had posted it. @jkirk. It was some months ago, maybe as far back as late fall.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #631709

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i can get various types of vents, along with blocks for mounting electrical fixtures on the outside of the house which allow siding to tuck into them. their sold at my siding supplier

    as for the siding hooks for james hartie siding, they used to be advertised in finehomebuilding all the time.. cant remember hte name of them but you should be able to find them pretty easy

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #631712

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    i can get various types of vents, along with blocks for mounting electrical fixtures on the outside of the house which allow siding to tuck into them. their sold at my siding supplier

    Do you know a brand name I can look up Jeff?

    How’s the leg/foot/Achiles btw. You back on the job doin’ physical now?

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #634171

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    OLD THREAD WARNING…sorta.

    I started tinkering with my setup for how to deal with fastening my Hardie lap siding. There’s still a couple of nuances to work out with regard to screwing them rather than nailing them. One thing I’m finding is that trying to use my 18V drywall screw gun, it’s apt to crack the siding and also it is harder to get the siding to remain flush with the face of the substrate. Even with variable speed control, it is a hit and miss trying to get that setup to work properly. It’s also prone to the screw going in askew with the drywall screwgun. The outer cuff on the screwgun drill can also leave a mark, but that would be covered by the overlapping siding anyways. I’m just gonna have to drive them with my regular driver. No biggee there. I had a feeling the drywall gun wouldn’t work for this anyways, so it’s no real surprise.

    I did figure out mostly also how to set myself up for a cutting station for the lap siding. I’m gonna be using mostly my Bullet Tools siding shearer for the straight and angled cuts. With the two Keter work tables and also a weird miter saw/tool stand I bought for a steal last fall to rest the shearer on, that will allow the platten to be at exactly the height of the Keter tables and some sawhorses, I should be good to go in that regard. Didn’t anticipate this combo of stands til yesterday, but after a few minutes taking some measurements, it looks like this should work and avoid me having to do some kind of custom build for a cutting station which is what I was hoping to avoid.

    The only issue I’d like to have better that I’m still pondering is not having to re-orient the stand that the shearer sits on for doing angled cuts even though it’s a mobile stand. But I don’t see that as being a big deal as when geitting to a point where I’d be doing angled cuts working up a wall, you’d just be re-positioning it once to do that series of cuts.

    I may actually also set up my MFT with my track saw with my CMT Hardie blade hooked up to my extractor and have that as a seperate station for the angled cuts or for doing rough length straight cuts before doing the actual angled cuts with the shearer. That may be easier all around. I feel I’ll get the versatility and efficiencies I want at this juncture and not be overly handling materials.

    We’re getting close guys. On the shed structure itself, I still need to do the rest of the soffit installs, corner trims, and mark out my studs, pop in a couple of dormer windows in the upper storage loft, but we’re pretty darn closer now than ever to finally cladding this forever shed build of mine and doing my first ever Hardie install.

    I do hope the weather starts cooperating better. It’s been weeks now of daily multiple thunderstorms rolling thru during the days here. It’s gotta change for the better in that regard at some point.

    I’m also nervous about how my Hardie siding has fared thru the winter. It was delivered way later than originally expected last mid December and has been sitting on pallets all wrapped up in my driveway. If water got in to the planks, I don’t know what to expect when I unwrap it. Got my fingers crossed on that one for sure! Wish me luck guys!

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #634180

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    OLD THREAD WARNING…sorta.

    I started tinkering with my setup for how to deal with fastening my Hardie lap siding. There’s still a couple of nuances to work out with regard to screwing them rather than nailing them. One thing I’m finding is that trying to use my 18V drywall screw gun, it’s apt to crack the siding and also it is harder to get the siding to remain flush with the face of the substrate. Even with variable speed control, it is a hit and miss trying to get that setup to work properly. It’s also prone to the screw going in askew with the drywall screwgun. The outer cuff on the screwgun drill can also leave a mark, but that would be covered by the overlapping siding anyways. I’m just gonna have to drive them with my regular driver. No biggee there. I had a feeling the drywall gun wouldn’t work for this anyways, so it’s no real surprise.

    I did figure out mostly also how to set myself up for a cutting station for the lap siding. I’m gonna be using mostly my Bullet Tools siding shearer for the straight and angled cuts. With the two Keter work tables and also a weird miter saw/tool stand I bought for a steal last fall to rest the shearer on, that will allow the platten to be at exactly the height of the Keter tables and some sawhorses, I should be good to go in that regard. Didn’t anticipate this combo of stands til yesterday, but after a few minutes taking some measurements, it looks like this should work and avoid me having to do some kind of custom build for a cutting station which is what I was hoping to avoid.

    The only issue I’d like to have better that I’m still pondering is not having to re-orient the stand that the shearer sits on for doing angled cuts even though it’s a mobile stand. But I don’t see that as being a big deal as when geitting to a point where I’d be doing angled cuts working up a wall, you’d just be re-positioning it once to do that series of cuts.

    I may actually also set up my MFT with my track saw with my CMT Hardie blade hooked up to my extractor and have that as a seperate station for the angled cuts or for doing rough length straight cuts before doing the actual angled cuts with the shearer. That may be easier all around. I feel I’ll get the versatility and efficiencies I want at this juncture and not be overly handling materials.

    We’re getting close guys. On the shed structure itself, I still need to do the rest of the soffit installs, corner trims, and mark out my studs, pop in a couple of dormer windows in the upper storage loft, but we’re pretty darn closer now than ever to finally cladding this forever shed build of mine and doing my first ever Hardie install.

    I do hope the weather starts cooperating better. It’s been weeks now of daily multiple thunderstorms rolling thru during the days here. It’s gotta change for the better in that regard at some point.

    I’m also nervous about how my Hardie siding has fared thru the winter. It was delivered way later than originally expected last mid December and has been sitting on pallets all wrapped up in my driveway. If water got in to the planks, I don’t know what to expect when I unwrap it. Got my fingers crossed on that one for sure! Wish me luck guys!

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #634481

    redwood
    Pro

    Hi Kevin, I’ve used those pvc flashings for receptacles and such on occasion. I’m sorry though, I can’t remember who made them. I don’t think I’d worry that much on a shed though. Just use peel and stick flashing tape.

    I can’t say I’ve ever heard of anyone screwing Hardi plank and it might even void the warranty. We used HDG ring shank siding nails.

    Your siding may have water stains, but should be fine structurally.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #634504

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I can’t say I’ve ever heard of anyone screwing Hardi plank and it might even void the warranty.

    They do have specs for screws in their installers manual. I like screws whenever I can and I’m also a bit of a klutz at times with that type of nail gunning, so I wanted to go with screws. The decision on that isn’t final yet though, but I’m heavily leaning towards screws. I feel I’d have more control and less prone to foul-ups.

    Hi Kevin, I’ve used those pvc flashings for receptacles and such on occasion. I’m sorry though, I can’t remember who made them.

    Thanks for chiming on that. Starting to give up on that quest for pre-made nice PVC recepticle flashing boxes. I know I saw them here some time last year on this forum. Shoulda bookmarked the darn post.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #634595

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Received my carbide tipped 3 pack of Hitachi fiber cement blades from Amazon yesterday. This was pretty well the last item I needed for that job coming up soon finally.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #634619

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Received my carbide tipped 3 pack of Hitachi fiber cement blades from Amazon yesterday. This was pretty well the last item I needed for that job coming up soon finally.

    Congratulations Kevin, will be interesting to see how they hold up,

    #634628

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Received my carbide tipped 3 pack of Hitachi fiber cement blades from Amazon yesterday. This was pretty well the last item I needed for that job coming up soon finally.

    Congratulations Kevin, will be interesting to see how they hold up,

    From the reviews I read, they seem to hold up very well. I don’t see myself using them a ton, but I need them nonetheless. I had wondered if any carbide tipped blade would do the trick, but not knowing for sure, I went with the Hitachi as that is what they are branded and sold to do.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #634790

    redwood
    Pro

    I used those Hitachi jig saw blades quite a bit and they worked fine. If I didn’t have those handy, I just used a diamond grit blade. If you want those blades to last, just use them for their intended purpose. Don’t use them in place of the other tools at your disposal, like your shear.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #634817

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I will generally just use a common wood blade in the jig saw. It does beat them up pretty good, but you usually don’t have a lot of jig sawing to do. I have had bad results with the Hitachi fiber cement circular saw blades in the past, so I would worry about the jig saw blades.

    #634826

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    I used those Hitachi jig saw blades quite a bit and they worked fine. If I didn’t have those handy, I just used a diamond grit blade. If you want those blades to last, just use them for their intended purpose. Don’t use them in place of the other tools at your disposal, like your shear.

    Thanks for chiming in Mark. My thoughts right now envisioning production doing this for the first time is that I probably won’t even go thru one blade for the odd times I’ll need them for this initial project. But I do know I will need them nonetheless for notches and whatnot.

    The Bullet Tools shearer will handle the vast majority of cutting. I just attached my Malco shearer head I bought last year to one of my beastier Bosch drills for the first time yesterday and did some cross cut tests. While I’m glad I didn’t buy this for its ability to do clean cuts with lots seeing lots of chipped edge I immediately noticed, it is not idea for accurate straight cuts either. I see that Malco drill attachment being used for rough length crooscuts cuts only to be followed with my Bullet Tools shearer for the final clean cut. It will have a role in a game plan I’m devising, but frankly I coulda done without it likely. Generates way more granular dust debris than I anticipated also.

    For any long straight rips, I’ll be using my TS75 track saw with a CMT fiber cement blade I bought. Haven’t experimented with that yet, but I doubt there will be any surprises when I go to use it. Of course I will have dust extraction to my Festool CT36AC extractor in doing so.

    I’ve studied this whole fiber cement install like crazy for a long time and feel at this juncture I am well prepared. Probably better than some pros who have installed Hardie for a long time in fact. Execution is the next step. That’s where I’m sure I’ll encounter new adventures. Lol!

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #635040

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I have never had an issue with the jigsaw blades, we had one job where we had to cut some arches out of the 1″ thick trim and to cut a wrap for an oval window. the blades sliced everything like butter.

    #637028

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    So now I’m real close to embarking on putting up Hardie Lap siding for the first time, just a couple of things to figure out.

    One is the starter strip. Hardie suggests ripping a one inch strip of Hardie and using it as a starter strip. I want to avoid this primarily for two reasons. One is it is a waste of expensive siding if something else could be used, and second it lends itself to potential damage of the leading bottom edge of the siding particularly in my situation with it being on a shed built on piers. I’m also concerned I may not have ordered enough siding even though I had tried to factor in 15% waste when I did my initial calcs when I ordered it. Would hate to have to order just a few strips at the end of it all due to my initial miscalculation.

    The latter concern may be applicable to any siding install, but with the leading edge bottom being beveled out away from a starter strip by what seems a minuscule amount of about 1/16th of an inch, I still see it prone as suffering breakage if anything bangs into that leading bottom edge as most of the edge will be near just below knee high around the perimeter of the shed.

    So basically my idea so far is I want to rip some cedar beveled strips instead for the bottom starter strip so that the overlapping backside of the siding of the first course sits flush to the face of the cedar starter strip as it does for all the other subsequent courses of siding.

    I also want to mitigate a minor potential risk with any water that may be migrating down the wall on the underside of the siding between the siding and the house-wrap from being trapped at the bottom of the cedar starter strip.

    Where I can see how the siding with it’s irregular simulated cedar face and a slopped/rounded upper edge can allow water to seep from top to bottom if it finds it way in between the backside of the siding and the house-wrap, once it reaches that bottom starter strip, it could remain trapped there somewhat if I don’t incorporate relief holes on the face of the custom made cedar strip that rest against the house wrap. With the backside of the siding not having a glazed non porous finish like its face, water getting absorbed by standing water trapped there with fiber cement siding is its worst culprit and could cause the bottom starter course of the siding to swell and become compromised.

    I have an idea for how to create some relief drainage for this using my Kapex or my TS stacked dado blades to run drain slots along that bottom cedar starter strip that would otherwise sit flush along its course against the house-wrap. I may also run the strips thru my router table to bevel the leading top edge also to further improve water drainage even further, we’ll see.

    Pics below are some sample pieces and mock up install lay-ups I was using to assess all of these options and concerns.

    Kevin.

    Support your local VIKING.

    #637048

    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    I would say if it makes you sleep better at night, do it. I’ve definitely used cedar for starter when materials were tight, not a big deal imo. I’ve thought about your same concerns, but never seen water be trappped behind the first course in practice. I’ve only seen fiber cement failures when ran too close to an abutting roofline or when no kick out flashings were installed at the end of a run of step flashing, or if cut ends weren’t sealed. I think you will generally see something going on with the paint finish well before the product breaks down.
    Not sure if it fits the style of your shed as it’s more of a craftsman detail, but you could install a “water table” base under the starter course, it would keep that bottom course protected, but might look funny since your shed is built up on piers. I’ll include a picture

    Attachments:
    #637068

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    You can buy fiber cement lap siding at most Lowes stores. Buy a couple pieces, and rip them down for your first few starters. Eventually, you will end up with other rips from finishers that can be used as starters.

    I wouldn’t worry too much about trapping water. Your siding will not be extremely tight along the entire edge of the row. Water will easily flow behind your siding or quickly evaporate.

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