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It's all about the $$$$ :-)

Viewing 20 posts - 81 through 100 (of 121 total)
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  • #459227
    #459244
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Cutting boards are a hard sell. Tons of labour and expensive equipment to make properly… And you can go into walmart and get them for next to nothing.

    It’s like anything else I guess, don’t low ball yourself and make what you want.

    I always like a nice end grain cutting board.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #459246
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Cutting boards are a hard sell. Tons of labour and expensive equipment to make properly… And you can go into walmart and get them for next to nothing.

    It’s like anything else I guess, don’t low ball yourself and make what you want.

    I always like a nice end grain cutting board.

    I agree to an extent. However, cutting boards can sell quite well at craft fairs, and if you have an active circuit of those near you they can be pretty profitable, especially since you can batch make them.

    Your point about Walmart is on point for many things, handmade furniture included. If a customer compares a table you make to an IKEA table, they will maybe not be able to see why yours is better (which hopefully it is!! 😉 Some places in the country and world are better than others about that. Usually where there is wealth, there are people willing to pay a reasonable price for quality, handmade furniture, because they know the difference between well built by a craftsman and built by a computer and assembled by the customer. This sentiment applies to anything from cutting boards to furniture, and anywhere in between.

    #459276

    Not mine, but looks like
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/15204810/3-Thick-Maple-End-Grain-Countertop-24×25-traditional-kitchen-countertops

    Wowssy that’s a nice board, expensive also, I would love to try to make one eventually, what does it mean put together with heat and high pressure, sorry don’t want to sidestep the thread

    #459278

    Not mine, but looks like
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/15204810/3-Thick-Maple-End-Grain-Countertop-24×25-traditional-kitchen-countertops

    Wowssy that’s a nice board, expensive also, I would love to try to make one eventually, what does it mean put together with heat and high pressure, sorry don’t want to sidestep the thread

    Heat is marketing garbage. They almost certainly use it to dry faster, but thats all

    Pressure is fancy for clamping very tightly

    #459279

    Not mine, but looks like
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/15204810/3-Thick-Maple-End-Grain-Countertop-24×25-traditional-kitchen-countertops

    Wowssy that’s a nice board, expensive also, I would love to try to make one eventually, what does it mean put together with heat and high pressure, sorry don’t want to sidestep the thread

    Heat is marketing garbage. They almost certainly use it to dry faster, but thats all

    Pressure is fancy for clamping very tightly

    Yes I figured that was about just clamping, I guess it’s just glue?

    #459367

    Cutting boards are a hard sell. Tons of labour and expensive equipment to make properly… And you can go into walmart and get them for next to nothing.

    It’s like anything else I guess, don’t low ball yourself and make what you want.

    I always like a nice end grain cutting board.

    How about a cutting board that has a pull out tray like the kurig coffee cup ones

    #459484
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Cutting boards are a hard sell. Tons of labour and expensive equipment to make properly… And you can go into walmart and get them for next to nothing.

    It’s like anything else I guess, don’t low ball yourself and make what you want.

    I always like a nice end grain cutting board.

    Well, I hope you are wrong in my case Brad! I just opened an Etsy page in the hopes of selling a few cutting boards and other miscellaneous items.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #459488

    I don’t intend to compete with you @jponto but if you can share some results, it would be enlightening. Thanks and good luck!

    #459694
    yellaD
    Pro

    Not mine, but looks like
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/15204810/3-Thick-Maple-End-Grain-Countertop-24×25-traditional-kitchen-countertops

    It’s gotta be worth it to make end grain cutting boards if you can sell for over $400 each…

    #459696

    Not mine, but looks like
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/15204810/3-Thick-Maple-End-Grain-Countertop-24×25-traditional-kitchen-countertops

    It’s gotta be worth it to make end grain cutting boards if you can sell for over $400 each…

    Those are Boos – they found a way to make mass-produced boards made of thin 4/4 and 3/4 stock (probably offcuts from a few production shops) into a premium product.

    Hell, see what a cutting board goes for at Williams Sonoma. An edge grain walnut made in a couple of minutes with probably half a 4/4 board goes for over a hundred.

    #459748
    The_Grizz
    Pro
    Rome, GA

    I think an important factor in cutting boards especially is making sure that whatever adhesive you use is approved for food contact. I know it will be dried before any food ever touches it, but people will be cutting wet meat and fruits on it, not to mention the knife will cut into the wood to some extent.

    #459749

    I think an important factor in cutting boards especially is making sure that whatever adhesive you use is approved for food contact. I know it will be dried before any food ever touches it, but people will be cutting wet meat and fruits on it, not to mention the knife will cut into the wood to some extent.

    Dont we all use Titebond anyways? Its as food safe as it comes

    #459804
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Bahahaha

    I was talking to a old guy today at the local greasy spoon (I took Emma for ice cream as it’s warmed up to -12*C). He told me that if you can afford your own projects (as a woodworker), you aren’t charging enough!

    He’s right!

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #459819
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I think an important factor in cutting boards especially is making sure that whatever adhesive you use is approved for food contact. I know it will be dried before any food ever touches it, but people will be cutting wet meat and fruits on it, not to mention the knife will cut into the wood to some extent.

    Dont we all use Titebond anyways? Its as food safe as it comes

    And as long as you use a food safe sealer all should be good.

    Bahahaha

    I was talking to a old guy today at the local greasy spoon (I took Emma for ice cream as it’s warmed up to -12*C). He told me that if you can afford your own projects (as a woodworker), you aren’t charging enough!

    He’s right!

    LOL! Funny but true!

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #459820
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Bahahaha

    I was talking to a old guy today at the local greasy spoon (I took Emma for ice cream as it’s warmed up to -12*C). He told me that if you can afford your own projects (as a woodworker), you aren’t charging enough!

    He’s right!

    That’s a fact. Sad but true.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #459926
    The_Grizz
    Pro
    Rome, GA

    The_Grizz wrote:I think an important factor in cutting boards especially is making sure that whatever adhesive you use is approved for food contact. I know it will be dried before any food ever touches it, but people will be cutting wet meat and fruits on it, not to mention the knife will cut into the wood to some extent.

    Dont we all use Titebond anyways? Its as food safe as it comes

    After some searching, turns out that Titebond II & III are FDA approved for cutting board use. I looked at gorilla wood glue also, and it is not specified, so I’m gonna say no.

    #459930
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    The_Grizz wrote:I think an important factor in cutting boards especially is making sure that whatever adhesive you use is approved for food contact. I know it will be dried before any food ever touches it, but people will be cutting wet meat and fruits on it, not to mention the knife will cut into the wood to some extent.

    Dont we all use Titebond anyways? Its as food safe as it comes

    After some searching, turns out that Titebond II & III are FDA approved for cutting board use. I looked at gorilla wood glue also, and it is not specified, so I’m gonna say no.

    I can’t imagine trying to use a polyurethane glue on a cutting board….all the foam everywhere!

    FWIW, approved or not, TBIII had been a great glue I my boards.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #459931

    The_Grizz wrote:I think an important factor in cutting boards especially is making sure that whatever adhesive you use is approved for food contact. I know it will be dried before any food ever touches it, but people will be cutting wet meat and fruits on it, not to mention the knife will cut into the wood to some extent.

    Dont we all use Titebond anyways? Its as food safe as it comes

    After some searching, turns out that Titebond II & III are FDA approved for cutting board use. I looked at gorilla wood glue also, and it is not specified, so I’m gonna say no.

    I can’t imagine trying to use a polyurethane glue on a cutting board….all the foam everywhere!

    FWIW, approved or not, TBIII had been a great glue I my boards.

    I use TB3 for everything, unless I need a lighter glue line or am using hide glue for an old furniture repair

    #460010
    whitehill
    Pro
    Ottawa, ON

    Some end grain board pictures for reference:

    Is that your work? I like your surfacing jig, and your logo.

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