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Is a study or course a requirement?

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  • #330947
    Jummul
    Pro

    I’m very quick to learn and very good on self-study. Would you say a course or a study is a requirement to become a professional? Contracter or whatever?

    I’m thinking there are certain things that really need study (working with certain materials) but some maybe don’t.

    #330953
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I am always looking to learn new things .The more you know the more you can do . I always watch and learn whenever the opportunity comes up .

    #330958
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I am always trying to learn new techniques and learn about new materials – there is a lot of good stuff on YouTube if you want to learn.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #330960
    Jummul
    Pro

    Yeah and that;s what I meant. Let me rephrase. Can I become a self-educated paid professional?

    In the Netherlands you’re requiered to get all kinds of education and licenses, and still the contracters know shit.

    #330961
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I know I am 57 years old and still learning.
    Some of the new ways are good and some of the old ways are better.
    I think most schools will get you started but experience is what you need. Watch the other guys and learn.

    #330971
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I know I am 57 years old and still learning.
    Some of the new ways are good and some of the old ways are better.
    I think most schools will get you started but experience is what you need. Watch the other guys and learn.

    I agree. Most of what I know can’t be fully learned or understand from books alone, it really takes hands on experience. Books/YouTube can’t teach you how to master anything, IMO. While formal education is great, it can only take you so far.

    Mandatory classes for tradesman may not be a horrible idea, as so many new guys struggle with a tape measure for example. A place to learn basics is a great starting point ( but trade schools already exist.)

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #330990
    TonyG
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    I think I got the best of both worlds. In Colorado school is not a requirement to become a licensed electrician you just need the hours on the job as an apprentice. However, the company I started with required their apprentice’s go to school. I really think it benefitted me. It helped me in ways the field couldn’t for example with the code book and learning the calculations. It also prepared me for my journeyman exam. On the other hand I learned things in the field that I would not could not in the classroom. Things that just come with experience, making mistakes.

    #330995
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    When I was in 9th grade a guy took me under his wing building twinplex apartments. I worked after school and on weekends. He taught me from the foundation up. That was the best education I got. I made 2 dollars a hour.

    #331001
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    the best is a mentor while on the job. class room I find is a step behind, meaning the people teaching you are not out in the field practicing daily what they preach. Im not saying classroom isn’t good but if you can i’d get a mentor or internship type deal.

    #331013
    redwood
    Pro

    Experience is really the best teacher and there are different ways of obtaining it. Classroom may be fine for teaching the business end of things and they can show you how to use a particular tool, but you will still need to job experience to cover those things that the classroom doesn’t even hint about.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #331062
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    A good mentor is as vital as the information you read when your situation differs significantly from the examples in the book. Good and efficient diagnosis and troubleshooting techniques come from experience.
    Remember, however, that knowledge gets diluted as it is passed on – if you retain half of what you’re shown, and he retained… . The books are still there for reference in the original form.

    In the Netherlands you’re requiered to get all kinds of education and licenses,

    Not only is initial formal education/training often required, but sometimes continuing training – x number of hours per year – is required to ensure you keep current with changes in the industry.

    #331085
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Not only is initial formal education/training often required, but sometimes continuing training – x number of hours per year – is required to ensure you keep current with changes in the industry.

    I’d sign up for this…and IMO, everyone else should too. Teachers have continuing education requirements that they must meet in order to renew their licenses, contractors should too.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #331121
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    In some cases formal training may help but I think one can learn a lot on the job providing they are willing to learn. I have seen graduates from 2 year carpentry programs who knew less than others who had 2 or 3 years on the job.

    A lot also depends on how far you go. If you want to be more than a 2 or 3 man operation, some schooling will help in managing the business side. there are a lot of great carpenters out there who do not have the business skills to manage a bigger organization, the same way being a great chef does not guarantee someone will be successful as a restaurant owner.

    #331147
    Jummul
    Pro

    Thanks for all the comments. I was more thinking in the line of a one man operation, getting paid for small, gradually larger, jobs and perhaps quitting my job one day.

    Anyhow that is just some thinking, I’ve been really busy with trying to find my ‘path’ and what construction has in it. I would love to be able to do this for a living but I’m afraid it’ll ruin my hobby.

    #331148
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    I think what the guys are saying is that there’s typically no formal course requirements for the trades, but hands-on experience is the best way to learn anyway.

    Also, like they said, working for a good mentor is very valuable.

    If you’re looking to get a license, usually state licensing boards give exams, plus they require a certain specified amount of verifiable work experience. The best way to get the work experience logged is to go to work for a company that will provide you that work history.

    Pat

    #331175
    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    Speaking from my experience, I think being self-taught in construction is very inefficient. That is essentially what happened to me, it wasn’t planned but I was promoted to leadership positions in every job after my first one and thus had no mentor to teach me. I’ve found many mentors since then but I’ve been self-employed for most of that time.

    I’m pretty confident that if I had started working for a solid company early on and stuck with it for at least five years, I could have avoided many of the holes in my knowledge, both in the trade and the running of a business. I’ve solved many of them but I’m frequently plagued by doubt about my efficiency and competency and I know that I would have made substantially more money in my life if I had followed that route.

    Self-taught is usually a description that I think indicates a stubborn or impatient person. That includes me. Learning from others requires a little up front sacrifice and humility but yields greater rewards.

    #331181
    staker
    Pro

    On the job training is the best IMO, and researching new materials and technics on the net. Before computers I would send out for info on new products through the mail, there is always something new to learn.

    #331186
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I took carpentry as a vocation through our high school. Half of my day, during junior and senior years were spent learning to be a carpenter. I finished tops in that class. When I got hired on my first construction job, I think I learned more that first week then I did in two years of school.

    3

    #331211

    Love books. That being said you can never beat experience.

    #331224

    I took carpentry as a vocation through our high school. Half of my day, during junior and senior years were spent learning to be a carpenter. I finished tops in that class. When I got hired on my first construction job, I think I learned more that first week then I did in two years of school.

    3

    That’s funny at the end of your statement . Nothin beats life experience on any job . But class room is also important to learn certain aspects of the job .

    Always willing to learn .

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