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Insulating a Crawl Space

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  • #755209
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I would like to insulate the crawl space of the house we bought this past fall. I going say half my house has a crawl space. The crawl space has the gas furnace and small cold room. The rest of the crawl space is used for storage. There is a concrete floor in all of the crawl space. The foundation wall is open where the front step is. I am assuming this where some cool air is coming from.

    My main concern is front wall of my house. I would have say around 1/2 of the block wall is above the ground. The main entrance and living room at the front of the house. I find these areas are much cooling then rest of the house.

    I am just trying figure out what is the best and easiest way to insulate this space.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755213
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Pictures would help but fiberglass batts will be your cheapest and probably easiest option.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #755215
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Pictures would help but fiberglass batts will be your cheapest and probably easiest option.

    Yes I know pictures would help. I just didn’t feel like going down there getting some. Sorry! I will try get some tomorrow.

    Edit: Pictures add to original post. Changed my mind.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755226
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I would be tempted to try a rigid board rockwool insulation. Critters don’t like it, it’s not affected by moisture, and it’s fireproof so you don’t have to put anything over it.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755228
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I would be tempted to try a rigid board rockwool insulation. Critters don’t like it, it’s not affected by moisture, and it’s fireproof so you don’t have to put anything over it.

    I keep forgetting that rock wool is so easy to get up there…near impossible to find in my area.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #755230
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I would be tempted to try a rigid board rockwool insulation. Critters don’t like it, it’s not affected by moisture, and it’s fireproof so you don’t have to put anything over it.

    I was thinking about Rigid board insulation. Rockwool is another option.

    I was just seeing what might be the best options.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755232
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I was thinking about Rigid board insulation.

    I thought the rockwool type specifically because foam board have to be covered because of the fire risk. Not sure if fibreglass has to, but it loses a lot of R value if it gets damp. Not sure what other types there are available.

    My first thought would have it sprayed with closed cell foam, but again, it has to be covered. What is the stuff they spray in quanson huts and shops that they don’t cover? That could be an option too.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755252

    I would be tempted to try a rigid board rockwool insulation. Critters don’t like it, it’s not affected by moisture, and it’s fireproof so you don’t have to put anything over it.

    Yes I would agree with rockwool also , probably easier to install than ridgid in some areas ,
    Plus great mold and fire retardant properties

    #755258
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I would stay away from the rockwool or any other batt or fibrous product. You want a product that will provide a vapor seal and not allow moisture transmission through it.

    in a northern climate like yours or ours here in Minnesota, batt insulation , while allowed, is not recommended in basements or crawlspaces. If we are not covering the space, like in a crawlspace, we typically use a Celotex Polyisocyanurate board that is 1 1/2″ thick. Using this instead of an extruded, or expanded, polystyrene, you can eliminate the covering to provide the thermal break as it is fated for no covering.

    We typically just glue it to the walls and seal the joints with foil tape. It is expensive, but will also do the best job. sometimes we use a few vinyl drive fasteners to secure it with plaster washers on them if necessary. Since it is foil faced, we tape all seams with foil tape to get an good air seal and caulk along the edges also.

    You should also look at having your rim area sealed with spray foam. it is an area where there are typically a lot of leaks and it appears to have no insulation in the photos.

    There is a brand of spray foam the does not need the ignition barrier or thermal break. With this you could spray the walls and rim and just be done. I do not remember the brand, but have a message in to a friend for that information.

    I have not used fiberglass batts or air permeable insulation in a basement for over 15 years. I found out that even when sealed with poly, in the winter, moisture would migrate through it and condense on the block walls, then freeze. In the summer, it would migrate the other way and condensate on the poly. in both cases, you end up with wet insulation and chances for mold.

    #755263
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    because foam board have to be covered because of the fire risk.

    Did not know this. What do you mean when you say covered?

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755264
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    probably easier to install than ridgid in some areas ,

    Ridgid insulation can be fasten to the foundation wall where batt insulation needs to studded walls. Not sure this would be easier. Or I am wrong?

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755266
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I would stay away from the rockwool or any other batt or fibrous product. You want a product that will provide a vapor seal and not allow moisture transmission through it.

    in a northern climate like yours or ours here in Minnesota, batt insulation , while allowed, is not recommended in basements or crawlspaces. If we are not covering the space, like in a crawlspace, we typically use a Celotex Polyisocyanurate board that is 1 1/2″ thick. Using this instead of an extruded, or expanded, polystyrene, you can eliminate the covering to provide the thermal break as it is fated for no covering.

    We typically just glue it to the walls and seal the joints with foil tape. It is expensive, but will also do the best job. sometimes we use a few vinyl drive fasteners to secure it with plaster washers on them if necessary. Since it is foil faced, we tape all seams with foil tape to get an good air seal and caulk along the edges also.

    You should also look at having your rim area sealed with spray foam. it is an area where there are typically a lot of leaks and it appears to have no insulation in the photos.

    There is a brand of spray foam the does not need the ignition barrier or thermal break. With this you could spray the walls and rim and just be done. I do not remember the brand, but have a message in to a friend for that information.

    I have not used fiberglass batts or air permeable insulation in a basement for over 15 years. I found out that even when sealed with poly, in the winter, moisture would migrate through it and condense on the block walls, then freeze. In the summer, it would migrate the other way and condensate on the poly. in both cases, you end up with wet insulation and chances for mold.

    That’s alot good info Kurt. I am sure your climate is pretty much the same as mine.
    I would like to use something that doesn’t need to be covered.
    I don’t want do anything that will cause mold. I have a bad allergy to mold.
    Mold makes really sick.

    Thanks for the info.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755271

    probably easier to install than ridgid in some areas ,

    Ridgid insulation can be fasten to the foundation wall where batt insulation needs to studded walls. Not sure this would be easier. Or I am wrong?

    Yeah sorry my bad , I thought it was between the floor joists you were thinking about ,
    Maybe sprayed insulation might be a better choice , would get into tight areas and might get better filling than either stiff or batt insulation , not sure if it has to be covered though ,
    You can always check your local codes and so on

    #755272
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    What do you mean when you say covered?

    With dry wall or similar.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #755273
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Polyisocyanurate board

    Ok I thought that is what you meant. Just wanted to make sure. Thanks.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755274
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    probably easier to install than ridgid in some areas ,

    Ridgid insulation can be fasten to the foundation wall where batt insulation needs to studded walls. Not sure this would be easier. Or I am wrong?

    Yeah sorry my bad , I thought it was between the floor joists you were thinking about ,

    Maybe sprayed insulation might be a better choice , would get into tight areas and might get better filling than either stiff or batt insulation , not sure if it has to be covered though ,

    You can always check your local codes and so on

    I like to keep my floors warm and insulating between the joints would do this.
    The furnace in in the crawl space so there is certain amount of heat in the crawl space.
    The kitchen is above the crawl space where the furnace is. The floor is usually always warm. Pretty much all the fountain wall in the ground.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755282
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I like to keep my floors warm and insulating between the joints would do this.

    Spray foam insulation. Nothing better than that.
    It’s best to buy the kit from wherever you find it cheaper and do it yourself. If you have a small surface to cover.
    Or call a company to give you an estimate, compare it and go from there.

    #755290
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I like to keep my floors warm and insulating between the joints would do this.

    Spray foam insulation. Nothing better than that.

    It’s best to buy the kit from wherever you find it cheaper and do it yourself. If you have a small surface to cover.

    Or call a company to give you an estimate, compare it and go from there.

    Spray foam might be the best way to go. I have about 65 feet wall to do. That is if I do all the crawl space. The wall in the livingroom & front entrance is 24 feet. So I not sure if kits would be the way to go.

    Yes it would hurt to get a few estimates.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #755292

    I like to keep my floors warm and insulating between the joints would do this.

    Spray foam insulation. Nothing better than that.

    It’s best to buy the kit from wherever you find it cheaper and do it yourself. If you have a small surface to cover.

    Or call a company to give you an estimate, compare it and go from there.

    Yeah that’s what I meant just above , probably the best solution , gets in pretty much every where ,
    Like you said I bought a kit for a job I did year’s ago , I think it was a few hundred dollars , I can’t remember if it was 3 or 5 hundred , but it covered a large area , they do have different sizes to , easy enough to do also.

    #755295
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    probably easier to install than ridgid in some areas ,

    Ridgid insulation can be fasten to the foundation wall where batt insulation needs to studded walls. Not sure this would be easier. Or I am wrong?

    Yeah sorry my bad , I thought it was between the floor joists you were thinking about ,

    Maybe sprayed insulation might be a better choice , would get into tight areas and might get better filling than either stiff or batt insulation , not sure if it has to be covered though ,

    You can always check your local codes and so on

    I like to keep my floors warm and insulating between the joints would do this.

    The furnace in in the crawl space so there is certain amount of heat in the crawl space.

    The kitchen is above the crawl space where the furnace is. The floor is usually always warm. Pretty much all the fountain wall in the ground.

    The best way to keep the floors warm is to insulate the perimeter of the crawl space and allow a little heat to dump into the crawl space. It will rise up through the floor. If the crawl space is room temperature, the floor will be also. Insulating the floor instead of the walls of the crawl space will actually give colder floors. Think about putting your hand on an exterior wall on a cold day, the wall is colder than the room temp. but if you touch a table in the room, it will be the same temperature as the air in the room.

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