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If you can start over again what would you have done differently?

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  • #680271
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I know most of us who buy power tools corded or cordless end up where we are at making purchasing decisions one tool at a time, some of us end up with multiple cordless platforms, duplicate tools etc…and may have regretted certain decisions.

    So my question is, if all your power tools disappeared for some reason and you have to start over, how would you do it differently then your original line up, and why?

    Would you stick with one battery platform and not get distracted by all the unique features of a specific tool from another brand?

    Would you go as many cordless as possible or will you still have a corded counterpart for every cordless as a backup?

    For the corded would you mix and match different brands?

    I am asking because I recently had a break into my garage and lost most of my tools. I have a few unstolen either because it’s too heavy, or because they were in my locked truck parked somewhere else.

    This is what I still have unstolen:

    Corded recipricating saw – Porter Cable model 735 variable speed “Tiger saw”
    Corded circular saw – Porter Cable model 347
    Corded rotary hammer – Bosch 1125 3VSR SDS hammer
    A corded dremel which is rarely used except when cutting cross threaded bolts or internal pipe cutting
    Corded Dremel OMT
    Corded Rockwell OMT
    Two Rigid 18V battery chargers with no battery no tool

    This what I need to replace QUICKLY (there are more I need but can wait):
    4.5″ angle grinder corded and possibly cordless
    cordless impact driver
    corded hammer drill – had a brushless cordless from Ridgid and was disappointed but may be it’s just Ridgid
    Cordless OMT
    Cordless one hand sawzall
    Compressor
    Palm nailer
    Framing nailer
    12″ compound miter saw (may be a slider this time)

    So I am at a point I can completely restart at least on the cordless tools. Any thoughts and comments would be appreciated.

    #680272

    If I started over, I would have fewer, but better, stuff

    Not necessarily Festool branded, but inspired by their “system,”

    So, a good vac/extractor, a track saw, a good router and jigsaw that can work on the same track. A full set of bench planes and chisels (veritas probably). An MFT/3. A bunch of accessories for the track saw to help with repeat cuts (rendering a “good” table saw much less important) and perhaps a baby table saw

    Some good sanders too – and clamps/hold-downs

    The rest would only happen if and when I had a need or saw a good sale

    #680291
    Clev08
    Pro

    I would buy Milwaukee M18 and M12 again, they have a huge variety of cordless tools available. Looking back I probably overpaid for one kit, just because their was no freebie included with it. I would also buy the most recent models as they have been improved upon, I think the Fuel tools are well worth the 15% premium cost up front because they run cooler, longer, and have more power. I would probably buy less of the 2 .0 amp M12 batteries, I have probably 10 of them and I much prefer to use the three 4.0 amp batteries that I have.

    For corded tools I would mix and match brands as long as they are well built like a Makita, Bosch, or Milwaukee. I would probably have bought a better OMT than the Dremel model I have. I would not buy both a corded and a cordless version of the same tool, if a brands cordless version can’t keep up, it’s not worth your money.

    My recommendations
    Compressor I would go with a rolair
    Framing gun Pasload
    M18 Fuel for the impact, hackzall, hammer drill, and grinder
    Miter saw I would go with the Bosch Glide hands down.

    Here is my lineup of Milwaukee cordless tools(I have added some since this picture), i’ve been accumulating them for 5 years and have only had to replace one switch which was covered by warranty.

    #680297
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I have no regrets.

    Not saying my system was perfect, but the ride sure was fun. I am a sucker for new things, and at one point had about 7 cordless impacts from 5 different companies. Not to mention that 30 years ago, the cordless lineup was pretty thin. Now there is so much to choose from, and even the worst ones now are better than the best ones then.

    #680308
    rerun_1965
    Pro
    holladay, TN

    to start over again I would have stayed in the service and retired with 30 years

    #680346
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’ve got a lot of opinions and potential insight on this as I myself have gome thru an immense theft claim years ago , but first, is the claims adjuster willing to let you buy what you may really want? What’s the deal with that? Some companies are more amenable than others to work with.

    Actually, re-reading your post again, is this an insurance claim at all?

    #680354
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I’ve got a lot of opinions and potential insight on this as I myself have gome thru an immense theft claim years ago , but first, is the claims adjuster willing to let you buy what you may really want? What’s the deal with that? Some companies are more amenable than others to work with.

    Actually, re-reading your post again, is this an insurance claim at all?

    Unfortunately there is no insurance claim. The garage is not my primary residence but at a property I am currently rehabbing. So what I carry during rehab for the property is builder’s risk insurance which covers property damages such as hurricane, fire, flood etc…but not personal property inside. It’s all out of pocket.

    If this had happened at my actual home, then home owner’s insurance would have covered some of it minus deductable. A typical policy would either cover the “current” value or “replacement” value. They issue you a check and you can buy whatever you want or keep the money.

    #680355
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    If I started over, I would have fewer, but better, stuff

    Definitely been my experience as well.

    There was at one time I had multiple versions of the same tool, and gradually I switched over to keeping just one better tool.

    #680356
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I would buy Milwaukee M18 and M12 again, they have a huge variety of cordless tools available. Looking back I probably overpaid for one kit, just because their was no freebie included with it. I would also buy the most recent models as they have been improved upon, I think the Fuel tools are well worth the 15% premium cost up front because they run cooler, longer, and have more power. I would probably buy less of the 2 .0 amp M12 batteries, I have probably 10 of them and I much prefer to use the three 4.0 amp batteries that I have.

    For corded tools I would mix and match brands as long as they are well built like a Makita, Bosch, or Milwaukee. I would probably have bought a better OMT than the Dremel model I have. I would not buy both a corded and a cordless version of the same tool, if a brands cordless version can’t keep up, it’s not worth your money.

    My recommendations
    Compressor I would go with a rolair
    Framing gun Pasload
    M18 Fuel for the impact, hackzall, hammer drill, and grinder
    Miter saw I would go with the Bosch Glide hands down.

    Here is my lineup of Milwaukee cordless tools(I have added some since this picture), i’ve been accumulating them for 5 years and have only had to replace one switch which was covered by warranty.

    I am also thinking the Milwaukee M18 fuel.

    Yes I do have a corded and cordless versions of some of the tools. I don’t know, I guess I worry about the cordless quit in the middle of the day, not necessary the actual tool, but ran out of juice on the batteries, or if the charger doesn’t work, or if I forgot to bring the box with extra batteries. I feel better knowing there is a usable backup with an extension cord. May be it’s unjustified, don’t know.

    #680359
    CB
    Blocked

    One of the dependencies to consider is your trade. If you are a plumber, for instance, and you regularly install PEX, you’d probably want to look at Milwaukee or Ridgid (owned by same company in China), as both brands offer a cordless PEX crimping tool.

    Even though Makita offers more variety and more types of specialized tools in their 18v cordless tool line than any of the other brands, Makita doesn’t offer a PEX crimper, to my knowledge.

    On the other hand, if you are a foundation retrofitter, and are looking for a cordless concrete vibrator wand to carry unencumbered underneath crawl spaces, then Milwaukee’s cordless system will not satisfy that need, whereas Makita and DeWalt (unrelated companies) both offer a cordless concrete vibrator wand.

    So I would certainly keep in mind the kind of work you end up doing, and which company offers all the tools you would like to have to assist you with that work more efficiently.

    Otherwise, I’d just replace tools as needed.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #680405
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    One of the dependencies to consider is your trade. If you are a plumber, for instance, and you regularly install PEX, you’d probably want to look at Milwaukee or Ridgid (owned by same company in China), as both brands offer a cordless PEX crimping tool.

    Even though Makita offers more variety and more types of specialized tools in their 18v cordless tool line than any of the other brands, Makita doesn’t offer a PEX crimper, to my knowledge.

    On the other hand, if you are a foundation retrofitter, and are looking for a cordless concrete vibrator wand to carry unencumbered underneath crawl spaces, then Milwaukee’s cordless system will not satisfy that need, whereas Makita and DeWalt (unrelated companies) both offer a cordless concrete vibrator wand.

    So I would certainly keep in mind the kind of work you end up doing, and which company offers all the tools you would like to have to assist you with that work more efficiently.

    Otherwise, I’d just replace tools as needed.

    Good points. Will keep that in mind.

    I REALLY like the Milwaukee one hand cordless sawzall. I use it more than my full length full functional sawzall.

    Regarding Ridgid and Milwaukee owned by the same company, that’s kinda sorta. Ridgid the American brand is a big name in the plumbing industry and has a nice tool line. That Ridgid the plumbing tool company is owned by Emerson Electric. Then a Hong Kong based company TTI licensed the brand name to sell a line of power tools under that name exclusively at The Home Depot. TTI also owns Milwaukee and Ryobi. But the power tool line up by Ridgid is a brand name licensing agreement. They can’t sell the same thing at other stores or online. So TTI does make Ryobi, Milwaukee and Ridgid, but the Ridgid power tools have nothing at all to do with Ridgid the plumbing company. Emerson electric also makes a line of shop vac sold at HD under the name Ridgid. This makes it really confusing because you see Ridgid branded shop vacs, power tools and plumbing tools at the orange color big box stores, but you have to call three different companies to get customer services for them.

    I read that Emerson is buying Textron’s tool line including Greenlee, so that will probably add more confusion to the Ridgid brand.

    #680415

    I have no regrets.

    Not saying my system was perfect, but the ride sure was fun. I am a sucker for new things, and at one point had about 7 cordless impacts from 5 different companies. Not to mention that 30 years ago, the cordless lineup was pretty thin. Now there is so much to choose from, and even the worst ones now are better than the best ones then.

    Haha yeah, way back they didn’t have big lineups in cordless,

    @Clev08 wow, nice collection

    If I had to redo it,
    Kinda hard, I really like the Makita and the Milwaukee line up?
    Especially since Milwaukee seems to be pumping out new cordless tools frequently,
    That being said,
    Still lots of choice from Makita and even ridgid , even dewalt has some nice cordless tools.

    I guess it might be a mixture,
    But I would definitely try to stay cordless
    Just because at times working on my property and the riding stables, sometimes it’s more convenient to just pop in a battery and go, instead of hunting for an extension, or getting the generator going.

    Great topic, it’s just too bad someone doesn’t make a general charger that can accommodate most major battery brands

    #680480
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    If I had it to do again,, I would have liked to have gotten an education so I could have had a real job anything other than a carpenter.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #680534
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    As for tools, I am quite happy with the 18v Makita and the 18v Bosch lines I have. I would have probably skipped the Bosch 12 V line however. I do not use it a lot, more because I typically have an 18v closer than not liking the 12v. they are fine tools, I just do not use them a lot.

    As for Other things, I would have bought less land before the downturn. I bought one development to many. I still have all my land but the carrying costs were high and I don’t know if I will ever develop it. I have plenty of other land to develop and don’t know if I want to keep working till I get that old.

    #680624
    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    I love my Bosch cordless (and corded) tools, but if I had to start all over? That would be a tough choice, so many good tools out there. I do wish Bosch had a bigger lineup of cordless, but honestly for the work I do, I really can’t think of anything I’m missing.

    As far as having a corded backup for every cordless, waste of money in my opinion.

    And @DirtyWhiteBoy If I had it to do over, I think I’d still be in the trades. Sometimes I’ve wished I had gone into something more specialized, like electric or plumbing or HVAC, but I really do love what I do.

    #680629
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    And @dirtywhiteboy If I had it to do over, I think I’d still be in the trades. Sometimes I’ve wished I had gone into something more specialized, like electric or plumbing or HVAC, but I really do love what I do.

    My back hurts too bad to love what I do.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #680692
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I think I am down to Milwaukee or Makita.

    I like some of the Ridgid tools especially the lifetime warranty on batteries is very attractive, but getting Ridgid means you have to have at least two platforms since their line up is limited. I also wonder how long the battery warranty will last since TTI do not own that name, they just license that name from Emerson Electric to sell the Ridid line at HD.

    Anyone know anything about that licensing agreement? It seems really restrictive. TTI can’t sell Ridgid online or at other outlets, only HD. I bet Ridgid lineup doesn’t carry as many products not because they can’t (they have Ryobi and Milwaukee putting out new tools all the time) but because they are limited by the licensing agreement or they don’t make enough $ from it. If Emerson decides to stop the licensing then Ridgid power tools is done and the batteries won’t get replaced? For this reason I am thinking Ridgid is a risk long term.

    #680738
    Clev08
    Pro

    I think I am down to Milwaukee or Makita.

    One thing to consider would be the availability in your area of Milwaukee or Makita, around here you don’t see much for Makita tools or service centers. Both brands have large lineups and have good reputations.
    As for the licensing stuff for a Ridgid tools I don’t have a clue nor do I own anything Ridgid except a small shop vac.

    #680932
    CB
    Blocked

    TTI can’t sell Ridgid online or at other outlets, only Home Depot. I bet Ridgid lineup doesn’t carry as many products not because they can’t (they have Ryobi and Milwaukee putting out new tools all the time).

    Ryobi can only be sold at Home Depot also, just like Ridgid.

    (This holds true despite a 1 star rated, no phone number available, shadow internet seller using Walmart Marketplace to resell a few discontinued or closed out Ryobi tools, and a few other outlets selling old stock replacement batteries from the pre lime green era).

    Ryobi used to be a Japanese tool company, who at one time hired TTI to manufacture some tool parts, and then later bought a 20% stake in TTI. But the stock faltered in fear of what would happen after the British turned Hong Kong over to China. Later, TTI bought the Ryobi brand lock stock and barrel. That was in 2000. In 2001, TTI negotiated a deal with Home Depot, who became an investor/supplier/partner, that resulted in Home Depot being the exclusive retailer of Ryobi.

    The rapid innovation in Ryobi and Milwaukee tools not only comes from the money and the market penetration that Home Depot as partner brings to the table… it also comes from the personality of the fellow that TTI hired to be the CEO of the company. This guy was previously responsible for dusting off the DeWalt brand name from the annuls of industrial history at the end of the ’80’s, and turning it into the bold yellow powerhouse of a construction tools brand in the 90’s.

    Now that guy is in charge of Milwaukee, and it is his mission in life to outdo himself in what he did for DeWalt, and to prove to Stanley Black and Decker that they wouldn’t have made it as far as they did without him, and will never win competing against him. That’s why Milwaukee has applications suites like One Key. He was a former wrestler. Very competitive.

    Yet the Home Depot investment and supplier/retailer partnership dominates TTI, so if you don’t want to support Home Depot for any reason, don’t buy Milwaukee.

    The only truly independent stand alone cordless hand held construction tool companies that I can think of at the moment (besides BTP sponsor Bosch) are Makita and Hilti. Makita is available in just about every tool and hardware store without sales restrictions as to where they can and cannot be sold.

    With Hilti, you more or less lease the tools with a service agreement. Well made, well crafted, but do not perform in the field better enough to justify the much higher cost to deploy their rather limited line up for light construction. The cost justification changes with heavy construction, because the service plan on more expensive tools is as important as the tool itself, for maintaining uptime on very expensive ($100 million plus) project schedules. I kind of miss the days when Hilti was sold retail at Home Depot (back in the 90’s)

    Anyway, I’m curious why DeWalt didn’t make your short list.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #680995
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Ryobi used to be a Japanese tool company, who at one time hired TTI to manufacture some tool parts, and then later bought a 20% stake in TTI.

    Ryobi still is a Japanese tool company and a respected one. Ryobi only sold it’s export division to TTI. Pronounced -Yobi

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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