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HVLP Sprayer Thread

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  • #628637
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    My tiny little 3m PPS cup came for my new Fuji Q4…and I already want to grab the big version!

    Do you mean the 22 oz ones Jon?

    I think they are 28oz actually. Because it is paired with he Fuji, the cup is a bit different than the standard type as it has a little rubber hose pressurizing the cup. The pressure style is only available in the mini (6oz, which I already owned a ton of the liners and lids) and the “large” size….skipping the sizes in between.

    I’m still getting my head wrapped around the 3M system. We should have a thread going on HVLP and also accessories like the 3M cups etc.



    @doobie
    , here you go!

    Do you have specific questions about the 3M PPS or are you just looking for general info?

    I use it on two guns, one is compressor driven and the other is a Fuji Q4 turbine system. In both cases, the guns are gravity fed and connected to the “mini” 3M cups which are 6oz. The compressor gun only has a 1.0mm needle/capset so it goes through the coating fairly slowly, but the big Fuji can empty the cup in a matter of seconds if it is wide open with the 1.8mm needle/capset.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #628653
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Good getting this thread going. I have the same unit as yours except I have the bottom feed one quart cup which I bought a couple of years ago with an intended major use for it, but that didn’t happen for a variety of reasons. I’m still glad I bought it then as the price on it has almost doubled on it to what it sells for now here in Canada. But I do have projects coming up that I want to use it for at some point this year some months from now.

    I have looked into the 3M system, which seems to make clean up a breeze and also tried to get my head wrapped around pressure pots as well. Any thoughts on getting a pressure pot yourself Jon?

    #628656
    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    So when painting something like that bookcase, aren’t you refilling the cup several times per coat? Seems aggravating, is it just a matter of getting a bigger cup or do you have to get a separate gun to run the larger cups. Probably a silly question, but I’m mostly ignorant about hvlp guns.

    #628671
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I have looked into the 3M system, which seems to make clean up a breeze and also tried to get my head wrapped around pressure pots as well. Any thoughts on getting a pressure pot yourself Jon?

    While it does make cleanup a bit easier…you still have to clean the guts of the gun. In the case of the Fuji, it is quite a few parts.

    Pressure pot…no, I don’t think I have the need. My projects are smallish and I’d be afraid that the paint would thicken up in the pot before I used it.

    So when painting something like that bookcase, aren’t you refilling the cup several times per coat? Seems aggravating, is it just a matter of getting a bigger cup or do you have to get a separate gun to run the larger cups. Probably a silly question, but I’m mostly ignorant about hvlp guns.

    At the rate I was spraying, I’d say it was about a cup and a half per coat. The first couple of coats I used the nylon cup that came with the gun until the 3M arrived. That nylon cup is closer to 20oz if I recall.

    All of the cups are compatable with the 3M setup. You just need to have an adapter that screws onto the gun where the cup attaches. (There are several variants with different threads and such….the cup end is the same). In my case, I already had a bunch of liners and lids for the mini cup from my compressor gun. I just needed the adapter and a pressurized version of the mini cup to use the liners/lids with the Fuji.

    Given the feed rate on the Fuji, I’m likely going to pick up the big cup and a box of liners…but that’s around $150 or so. For now, I’ll use the nylon cup and just wash it out when I need a big cup.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #629007
    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    Jon, thanks for the info, I was thinking you were spraying the bookcases with the 6oz cup, and picturing you’d be stopping to refill every few minutes.

    Another question, why do you like the gravity fed versus the siphoning guns? I’ve been watching some YouTube videos and am seeing woodworkers using both styles, and haven’t been able to decipher what the difference is, short of the obvious one. In my mind, I would think that the siphoning style would allow you to spray with the gun in any orientation without losing feed, but I thought I heard a guy say that the gravity fed does the same. If that’s the case, is it just a matter of balance in your hand and personal preference?

    #629008
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I prefer the balance of the gravity style cup. When you add the 3M PPS to a gun, you can use a gravity or syphon gun in any orientation because the liner collapses and basically squeezes the paint/clear right out regardless of the angle. IMO, this is the biggest advantage to the 3M system. Cleanup is a bit faster, but being able to turn the gun in literally any orientation is very helpful.

    As for preference, I think it may just be what people are used to. I’ve only used the gravity style extensively and the few times I used a syphon, I didn’t care for the feel. Fuji makes both types that use the same base gun. The only difference being where the fluid enters the gun itself.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #629040
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I was thinking of going with the 3M and also getting their 2 quart pressure pot. Both systems would cover all the bases for me and allow spraying in any direction. Getting a small gravity feed like yours Jon may also be in the cards for added versatility on small tasks.

    #629053

    I need to get something. Just went through eight shaker cans today…. my finger feels like its going to fall off

    #629069
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I need to get something. Just went through eight shaker cans today…. my finger feels like its going to fall off

    Lol. You definitely need an upgrade!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #629071

    I need to get something. Just went through eight shaker cans today…. my finger feels like its going to fall off

    Lol. You definitely need an upgrade!

    I have a hvlp gun, but my little 4.6gallon twin tank cant handle much. I had a cheap airless sprayer, a Wegner, but it died halfway through its first door.

    So, Im in a pickle unless I want to drop pro level $

    #629074
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I need to get something. Just went through eight shaker cans today…. my finger feels like its going to fall off

    Just buy one of those $5 spray can trigger outriggers.

    #748004
    Doobie
    Moderator
    OLD THREAD WARNING.

    I prefer the balance of the gravity style cup. When you add the 3M PPS to a gun, you can use a gravity or syphon gun in any orientation because the liner collapses and basically squeezes the paint/clear right out regardless of the angle. IMO, this is the biggest advantage to the 3M system. Cleanup is a bit faster, but being able to turn the gun in literally any orientation is very helpful.

    As for preference, I think it may just be what people are used to. I’ve only used the gravity style extensively and the few times I used a syphon, I didn’t care for the feel. Fuji makes both types that use the same base gun. The only difference being where the fluid enters the gun itself.

    I was thinking of going with the 3M and also getting their 2 quart pressure pot. Both systems would cover all the bases for me and allow spraying in any direction. Getting a small gravity feed like yours Jon may also be in the cards for added versatility on small tasks.

    I went and recently bought the 2 quart pressure pot. I needed to be able to spray in all directions for repainting a pair of 20 year old adirondak chairs wifey has us trying to restore.

    I’m finally gonna use this Fuji for something, Bought it years ago for a fencing task, but went another route. Still glad I did buy it then as its price has really jumped thru the roof since then here in Canada despite the fact they are made 20 miles away from here.



    @jponto07
    , how’s yours been for you?

    Did my initial hook ups tonite for the 2 quart pressure pot and I have to say their instructions are absolutely awful or non existent.

    They really need to hire a technical writer and expand the pics in their manuals from thumbnail postage sized pics where you can’t discern squat basically. Whole whack of directions are simply ommitted.

    Found a vidoe online from them, but is nowhere on their website, and even that was semi useless in what was needed to hook up their 2 quart pot to the system.

    #748014

    Funny thing is , I’m starting to look at the graco spray guns , kinda pricey , but it’s definitely going to reduce the time , just taking more prep time , but also will provide a better finished product ,
    I figured in the long run it will be worth it

    #748024
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Did my initial hook ups tonite for the 2 quart pressure pot and I have to say their instructions are absolutely awful or non existent.

    They really need to hire a technical writer and expand the pics in their manuals from thumbnail postage sized pics where you can’t discern squat basically. Whole whack of directions are simply ommitted.

    Found a vidoe online from them, but is nowhere on their website, and even that was semi useless in what was needed to hook up their 2 quart pot to the system.

    Why is it that they have make to instructions that difficult. Really takes way to long to put things together then it should.

    That looks like really nice sprayer. I am sure the pressure pot will make a big difference.
    I have mention before I wouldn’t mine getting a paint sprayer. I just realized that there will be alot interior doors at the new house that will need to be painted. This might be a good job for a paint sprayer. Then I will have for all woodworking projects.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #748027
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Funny thing is , I’m starting to look at the graco spray guns , kinda pricey , but it’s definitely going to reduce the time , just taking more prep time , but also will provide a better finished product ,

    I figured in the long run it will be worth it

    we spray everything with an airless spray and lacquer. It is a huge time saver and once you get the hang of it, lacquer is easy and forgiving. If you get a run, let it dry, spray it again and rub it out with your finger. Lacquer melts itself, so repairs are easy.

    Lacquer will also dry to recoat in 20 minutes to a half hour. It can be sanded in that time also. Many times if we need to make a additional piece of trim, it can be done in an hour or two instead of waiting all day for polyurethane to dry overnight.

    I use a couple of Titan 440’s, one I keep set up for Lacquer all the time and the other I use for paint. While the cost of an airless is more than a air pot or the less expensive HVLP, The time it will save makes up for it in the long run.

    I used to use a HVLP and would need to fill the reservoir over and over on a job. With the airless guns, you can just drop the hose into a 5 and go. It takes several hours to go through a 5. I can probably do a whole house with a 5, doors, trim and everything.

    You will not be disappointed making the switch to airless. I wish I would have done it years before I did.

    #748073
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Went and got the Fuji sprayer all set up outside late this aft and primed two Muskoka chairs, top and bottom.

    Man, I’m glad I got that pressure pot. I can’t imagine doing it without being able to use the gun in all the directions needed.

    The wood was sucking up loads for the first while, but eventually as coats would dry, I managed to finish all the priming in one long session.

    Thinned the primer somewhere around 25-30% with water, tested on a piece of cardboard and got feel for the controls and away I went. Finished just as it was getting dark. Went thru half a gallon almost. I think I did the equivalent of like three coats on the top and two on the less visible undersides. The undersides didn’t have much of the old hide stain sanded off and was still sealing, so it should be plenty.

    That Fuji unit gets real hot, almost scorched my hand when I went to remove the air feed hose brass coupling from the unit. First time using a real spray gun set up. Got the hang of it pretty quick.

    Clean up is no different than other painting, it sucks! But otherwise, it was fun. Looking forward to getting the real paint on it which likely won’t be for at least a few days.

    Got a few drip marks. Gonna need some light sanding in some parts maybe before the paint gets sprayed. Was getting hard to see well out there, even with some lighting. Already there’s a few little itsy bitsy bugs stuck to it. It’s got a 7 to 10 days cure timeframe. Might wait til it cures to deal with. Usually that’s best.

    I recall almost 20 years putting on the hide stain on them when they were new. Took way lomger than with this sprayer. Getting paint in between the slats was really the trickiest part making sure there was coverage there.

    What still kinda kills me in all of this is that the primer and paint ran me around $160 at Ben Moore, never mind all the prep and this painting work. Wifey knows this, but she really wanted to keep these chairs. I don’t even use them myself, just like the look of them. They’re a pain to get up from.

    #748086
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I use a couple of Titan 440’s,….

    I came so close to buying a Titan a couple of years ago. They were clearing out a whole whack of them at HD at 25% of their normal price. Kinda wished I did. I realized today that my Fuji would take forever to spray walls and ceilings.

    #748092

    Funny thing is , I’m starting to look at the graco spray guns , kinda pricey , but it’s definitely going to reduce the time , just taking more prep time , but also will provide a better finished product ,

    I figured in the long run it will be worth it

    we spray everything with an airless spray and lacquer. It is a huge time saver and once you get the hang of it, lacquer is easy and forgiving. If you get a run, let it dry, spray it again and rub it out with your finger. Lacquer melts itself, so repairs are easy.

    Lacquer will also dry to recoat in 20 minutes to a half hour. It can be sanded in that time also. Many times if we need to make a additional piece of trim, it can be done in an hour or two instead of waiting all day for polyurethane to dry overnight.

    I use a couple of Titan 440’s, one I keep set up for Lacquer all the time and the other I use for paint. While the cost of an airless is more than a air pot or the less expensive HVLP, The time it will save makes up for it in the long run.

    I used to use a HVLP and would need to fill the reservoir over and over on a job. With the airless guns, you can just drop the hose into a 5 and go. It takes several hours to go through a 5. I can probably do a whole house with a 5, doors, trim and everything.

    You will not be disappointed making the switch to airless. I wish I would have done it years before I did.

    Thanks Kurt , lots of great information here ,
    I had not known that about the lacquer 👍
    How are they for over spray
    Definitely going to get lots of those protective plastic and paper rolls ,

    #748100
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Went and got the Fuji sprayer all set up outside late this aft and primed two Muskoka chairs, top and bottom.

    With those chairs spraying is the way to go.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #748545
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Went and got the Fuji sprayer all set up outside late this aft and primed two Muskoka chairs, top and bottom.

    Man, I’m glad I got that pressure pot. I can’t imagine doing it without being able to use the gun in all the directions needed.

    The wood was sucking up loads for the first while, but eventually as coats would dry, I managed to finish all the priming in one long session.

    Thinned the primer somewhere around 25-30% with water, tested on a piece of cardboard and got feel for the controls and away I went. Finished just as it was getting dark. Went thru half a gallon almost. I think I did the equivalent of like three coats on the top and two on the less visible undersides. The undersides didn’t have much of the old hide stain sanded off and was still sealing, so it should be plenty.

    That Fuji unit gets real hot, almost scorched my hand when I went to remove the air feed hose brass coupling from the unit. First time using a real spray gun set up. Got the hang of it pretty quick.

    Clean up is no different than other painting, it sucks! But otherwise, it was fun. Looking forward to getting the real paint on it which likely won’t be for at least a few days.

    Got a few drip marks. Gonna need some light sanding in some parts maybe before the paint gets sprayed. Was getting hard to see well out there, even with some lighting. Already there’s a few little itsy bitsy bugs stuck to it. It’s got a 7 to 10 days cure timeframe. Might wait til it cures to deal with. Usually that’s best.

    I recall almost 20 years putting on the hide stain on them when they were new. Took way lomger than with this sprayer. Getting paint in between the slats was really the trickiest part making sure there was coverage there.

    What still kinda kills me in all of this is that the primer and paint ran me around $160 at Ben Moore, never mind all the prep and this painting work. Wifey knows this, but she really wanted to keep these chairs. I don’t even use them myself, just like the look of them. They’re a pain to get up from.

    Sounds like your sprayer did a good job and the pressure pot is the way to go. How did like using it? Cleaning up after does suck.
    Yeah with you on those chairs. I have hard time getting out of them. All I can say is they look nice.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

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