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How would you handle this?

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 20 total)
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  • #268232
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    Looking at replacing this crown for a client. It runs the entire perimeter of his house, it marks the transition from brick to stucco. My concern is flashing it, I feel like there should be some metal drip edge on it. I’m thinking of chalking a line 2 inches up and cutting a saw kerf to tuck the flashing into. Might try to do it in copper if his budget allows.

    #268245
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    Woops. Forgot the photo.

    #268247
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    #268251
    staker
    Pro

    When you take the old crown off is there a way that the flashing can get tucked behind the stucco. And I wouldn’t put wood crown back on just transition it with metal.

    #268259
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Is the transition properly flashed to begin with? The reason I ask is because the crown detail seems like an add on(after the existing flashing etc). I’m no mason, but shouldn’t a kick out flashing be behind the stucco to brick transition?

    If all of these things are good, I don’t think you’d need to flash the crown. Any moisture that happens to get behind the crown will run down the face of the wall, right?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #268266
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    When you take the old crown off is there a way that the flashing can get tucked behind the stucco. And I wouldn’t put wood crown back on just transition it with metal.

    It’s an historic home, so it needs to have the crown. I might try to see if I can get boral to mill some up, otherwise I’ll probably get it done in mahogany.

    The crown and stucco are original to the home, it looks like the existing flashing and crown are in serious disrepair, I’m not sure if I could tuck new flashing under the stucco or not.

    #268269
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I think setting the flashing/drip cap into the stucco would be the way to go. Copper would be my preferred material and it would look the best too. I don’t see a problem with putting wood crown back though if it was my house I would go an Azek type of material just to eliminate a lot of maintenance.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #268277
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    Is the transition properly flashed to begin with? The reason I ask is because the crown detail seems like an add on(after the existing flashing etc). I’m no mason, but shouldn’t a kick out flashing be behind the stucco to brick transition?

    If all of these things are good, I don’t think you’d need to flash the crown. Any moisture that happens to get behind the crown will run down the face of the wall, right?

    There should be a kickout flashing between the stucco and brick but I think still need a metal cap over the crown. Without the cap leaves, snow, and ice would build up and wreak havoc behind the crown, it might even push it off the wall.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #268436
    KenW
    Pro

    It’s an historic home, so it needs to have the crown. I might try to see if I can get boral to mill some up, otherwise I’ll probably get it done in mahogany.

    The crown and stucco are original to the home, it looks like the existing flashing and crown are in serious disrepair, I’m not sure if I could tuck new flashing under the stucco or not.

    How old is the home?

    #268440

    Looking at replacing this crown for a client. It runs the entire perimeter of his house, it marks the transition from brick to stucco. My concern is flashing it, I feel like there should be some metal drip edge on it. I’m thinking of chalking a line 2 inches up and cutting a saw kerf to tuck the flashing into. Might try to do it in copper if his budget allows.

    What you described would be same as I would do it .

    Always willing to learn .

    #268462
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    It’s an historic home, so it needs to have the crown. I might try to see if I can get boral to mill some up, otherwise I’ll probably get it done in mahogany.

    The crown and stucco are original to the home, it looks like the existing flashing and crown are in serious disrepair, I’m not sure if I could tuck new flashing under the stucco or not.

    How old is the home?

    1920s I believe

    #268463
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I think setting the flashing/drip cap into the stucco would be the way to go. Copper would be my preferred material and it would look the best too. I don’t see a problem with putting wood crown back though if it was my house I would go an Azek type of material just to eliminate a lot of maintenance.

    I think Chad nailed it. The flashing/drip cap would be how I would go about it. I like the idea of using Azek as well.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #268475

    Late to the party again. @ChadM has your answer. Can you score under and behind the stucco and slip the new custom flashing up behind?

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #268482
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    Late to the party again. @ChadM has your answer. Can you score under and behind the stucco and slip the new custom flashing up behind?

    Don’t know if I can get behind the stucco or not. I’d be worried about causing it to break away from the wall.

    #268483
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Is the transition properly flashed to begin with? The reason I ask is because the crown detail seems like an add on(after the existing flashing etc). I’m no mason, but shouldn’t a kick out flashing be behind the stucco to brick transition?

    If all of these things are good, I don’t think you’d need to flash the crown. Any moisture that happens to get behind the crown will run down the face of the wall, right?

    There should be a kickout flashing between the stucco and brick but I think still need a metal cap over the crown. Without the cap leaves, snow, and ice would build up and wreak havoc behind the crown, it might even push it off the wall.

    You make a good point. I didn’t consider leaves and snow/ice potentially building up and causing issues.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #271563
    keko
    Pro

    you should definitely put a flashing back behind the stucco or there will be problems later on .

    #271568

    I’m no expert, but commonsense would be telling me exactly what Chad had mentioned. And as Chad mentioned earlier I would try the Azek material first. Let us see the latest results.

    #271575
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I would have to agree with Chad also.. you need a flashing that will get behind the stucco, have a slope away from the house and also cap the crown and create a drip edge so the water will not just run down the face of the crown. The Azek or another vinyl product is also another good suggestion. whenever possible I will replace wood trims with Azek or similar to provide longer term durability.

    If you can not get a flashing behind the stucco, don’t do the job, you are asking for problems.

    #271743
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    I just went over there to pull a peice of the crown. It doesn’t look like I can get anything behind the stucco.

    There are two porch roofs, it looks like the counter flashing for those is kerfed into the stucco. The stucco is directly over the brick, so I’m not sure if it would cause many problems.

    #271762
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I think the safest course would be to demo the stucco a foot up from the brick, install your crown, flash it properly, then have the stucco repaired.

    That being said I think you would be alright cutting a kerf into the stucco for the flashing. As long as you use a quality sealant like:

    http://www.quikrete.com/ProductLines/PolyurethaneConcreteCrackSealant.asp

    http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/pl_seal_rf/overview/Loctite-PL-S30-Polyurethane-Roof-&-Flashing-Sealant.htm

    or maybe a mastic to fill the kerf I wouldn’t foresee any issues.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

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