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How to saw a log

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  • #332704
    Jummul
    Pro

    I have logs of up to 15″ in diameter. What would be the best way to cut it using regular powertools? Are there blades for a reciprocating saw this size?

    EDIT: miscalc on inches. Not 30″ lol, 15″.

    #332708
    Doobie
    Moderator

    There are people with mobile mills that can do this for you on site.

    Closest I can think of doing this yourself is with a chainsaw and one of these….

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=20127&cat=1,41131

    #332712
    Jummul
    Pro

    There are people with mobile mills that can do this for you on site.

    Closest I can think of doing this yourself is with a chainsaw and one of these….

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=20127&cat=1,41131

    Sorry I wasn’t clear. I didn’t mean in length, but how to cut cilindrical slices from it. I have a lot of logs with non-square cut edges. I want to cut them square so I can make them into nightstands.

    #332726
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    If you’re feeling energetic you could cut them into slabs with a bow saw and make a router sled to true them up

    #332731
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Yeah I agree with a bow saw would be safest.

    #332749
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Are you trying to mill them into lumber. you could use an old fashion saw pit. Sawers were called dogs, I bet you can guess where the term top dog came from, and also the term underdog.

    Attachments:
    #332754
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    If you can find someone with a good sized bandsaw you could cut them up that way. I have a few logs that I’ve been drying for the last couple years that I want to slice up at some point. My bandsaw isn’t quite big enough for them so I’ll probably just take them by a mill when I’m ready to use them.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #332806
    Dustincoc
    Pro
    Madrid, NY

    chainsaw mill.

    Shop Blog: http://ravenbarsrepair.tumblr.com/
    Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz498FKw9LF1awJsKIqhoxQ

    #332841
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I have a few friends with sawmills so ripping lumber is never an issue for me 🙂

    #332849
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I have a few friends with sawmills so ripping lumber is never an issue for me :-)

    Doesn’t he want to cross cut it ?

    #332853
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I have a few friends with sawmills so ripping lumber is never an issue for me :-)

    Doesn’t he want to cross cut it ?

    Then a chainsaw would be best for that

    #332863
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Doesn’t he want to cross cut it ?

    That’s what I thought.

    #332916

    I would get a portable mill to cut them into planks – I believe you can hire the service too. Then it will take a long time to air dry – depending on thickness. Sticker between boards and cover it while drying and you will end up with some great wood in the future.

    Orange County, CA

    #332931
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I would get a portable mill to cut them into planks – I believe you can hire the service too. Then it will take a long time to air dry – depending on thickness. Sticker between boards and cover it while drying and you will end up with some great wood in the future.

    I think he wants rounds for coffee tables. I’d cut it length wise too then make the table as long as you would want it.

    #332935
    Jummul
    Pro

    I’m talking about cross cutting indeed. I’m sorry if my lingo isn’t really up to speed 🙂

    #332942
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m talking about cross cutting indeed. I’m sorry if my lingo isn’t really up to speed :-)

    What is it you want to accomplish with cutting these logs/pieces up? Boards, blocks for woodturning, or something else?

    And how well dried/season are they? That can make a difference in determining what you can and can’t do with them at different junctures and also how you need to deal with them after they are cut?

    Do you own a moisture meter?

    #332951
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    Sorry I wasn’t clear. I didn’t mean in length, but how to cut cilindrical slices from it.

    A chainsaw or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Five-foot_crosscut_saw.jpg (remarkably easier than it looks) to cut and then a router jig like posted before would work.
    The chainsaw bar length should be greater than the diameter of what you are cutting.

    #332953
    Jummul
    Pro

    I’m talking about cross cutting indeed. I’m sorry if my lingo isn’t really up to speed :-)

    What is it you want to accomplish with cutting these logs/pieces up? Boards, blocks for woodturning, or something else?

    And how well dried/season are they? That can make a difference in determining what you can and can’t do with them at different junctures and also how you need to deal with them after they are cut?

    Do you own a moisture meter?

    I want to make a nightstand like this

    The wood is not terribly dry. I don’t own a moisture meter unfortunately.

    #332959
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Not sure if you could find this unit where you live – Netherlands if I’m not mistaken – but LV who sells internationally sells this unit for a moisture meter.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=71986&cat=1,43513,45788

    I used it last year with great satisfaction for a fence build where I had to ensure a degree of moisture in the boards before staining. Worked dandy!

    You seem to want to take a trunk of wood and crate a pedestal/stand with it. Is that correct?

    #333017
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    I think we all had a different idea of of your plan – the picture helps.
    It looks like it has some sort of small feet on it, probably ajustable. The base wouldn’t have to be perfectly square that way and wouldn’t rock on a hard floor.
    Also, what would you use as ‘square’ on a log that’s not absolutely straight?
    I’d get the base ->close<- to whatever appears perpendicular, and reasonably flat and then tack on some shims of the same approximate thickness as the feet I’d be using. You can more easily judge the bottom by measuring the slight rise from a flat floor than measuring the overall length. Then get the top level. Put the feet on and recheck, rotating to see how flat the bottom really is and if any further flattening is needed. Then sand out the top.
    I’d suggest a router with a large straight bit, belt sander with coarse paper, and a random orbital sander with 60 to 120 grit paper for the top.
    What finish do you intend to apply?
    Consider also the weight involved here. You may want to remove some of the bottom center, maybe 20% of the diameter as deep as you reasonably can.

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