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How to repair garage wall leakage and concrete?

This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Miamicuse 3 weeks, 3 days ago.

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  • #732519

    Hi pros: I have a problem for my garage. Please see photo and best way of how to repair it. Thanks a lot in advance.

    #732528

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    So pics and more info would help.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #732533

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Where are you located?

    How old is the house?

    How long has it been like that?

    Is that stucco?

    What happened?

    What are the black marks?

    What is your level of commitment to doing this correctly, as in, do you just want to patch it up and sell it or flip it, or are you looking for the proper way to do this?

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #732535

    Hi, I’m located in Canada. This is my garage about 30 years old. It’s been like this for few years. Its stucco. Black mark is mud. Patch it up and stop the water going into the garage. Thank you!

    #732604

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    It appears that you have an underlying issue with the framing being the same level with the sidewalk.

    That would be a major code violation in my area.

    It also appears that you have some serious rotting of the framing.

    Are you planning on fixing that?

    I’m sorry, I don’t know your level of construction experience. I assume you are a Diy’er, that is going to try to fix this yourself?

    The proper way to do this, is to remove as much stucco as is necessary to fully ascertain what is going on.

    Then, you’ll need to remove and replace any rotted framing.

    Then, and only then, replace the stucco.

    Wood framing at the same level as an outdoor concrete sidewalk is abad idea, and is a problem waiting to happen.

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #732607

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I agree. I’d shore up the garage roof and start to strip it down. Remove all the rot and it would be a good idea to form a curb to bolt the sill plate to. That looks like a mess that just keeps going, good luck.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #732621

    Doobie
    Moderator

    And am I seeing one of those gutter spout extensions laying on the ground along the far back alongside the base of the wall running the water run off along the edge of the structure? If so, you need to divert that away from the structure out towards the back not along the side of the building.

    It appears that you have an underlying issue with the framing being the same level with the sidewalk.

    That would be a major code violation in my area.

    It is here in Canada as well.

    Iā€™d shore up the garage roof and start to strip it down. Remove all the rot and it would be a good idea to form a curb to bolt the sill plate to.

    Exactly. You need a good 8 inches from grade of foundation curb from grade. It’s a big job. Lifting a structure up off it’s perimeter, putting in a proper curb, repair all the rotted wood, dropping it back onto the new curb wall, then re-stucco the walls. Not a DIY job.

    #732624

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I agree. Iā€™d shore up the garage roof and start to strip it down. Remove all the rot and it would be a good idea to form a curb to bolt the sill plate to. That looks like a mess that just keeps going, good luck.

    I would agree. When we build a garage on a slab, we dowel an 8′ high block to the top of the slab then frame the walls on that. Whenever I have seen one framed right on top of the concrete, I see rotten lumber and damage like your pictures show.

    Lift the garage a foot or two then lay block or form a curb on top of the existing concrete. remove and replace all rotten material from the structure and reset the garage on the block. You will need to epoxy threaded rod into the concrete floor that runs up through the block to be able to bolt the garage down properly. A lot of work but really the only way to fix it correctly.

    #732647

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Another way to tackle this, and once again, it might be a bit much for a DIY project, depending on how determined you are, šŸ˜† but you can build a temp wall inside the garage, a couple feet back from the existing wall, cut the bottom 18″ or so inches off the existing wall, lay 2 courses of block, fill with grout, slide a new PT sill plate down, and toe nail the studs to it.

    šŸ˜®

    This is a bit more difficult than I’ve made it sound. šŸ˜†

    It is also dependent on a couple of major issues.

    1, how far up does the rot go? If it’s more than the distance to the top of the new block, then you’re up against removing the whole wall anyway.

    2, access. It can be difficult to do it this way. You need to be able to get in there with a roto-hammer and set dowels up into the block cores, pour grout, and slide in a new plate. Then drill and dowel in the AB’s. Because you won’t be able to slide the plate over the AB’s. šŸ˜®

    I’ve done some like this, and it’s a big job.

    3, the temp wall studs must line up with the garage ceiling joists, and the wall MUST be braced.

    4, cutting the wall has to be very accurate, because the remaining studs have to land on the new plate exactly.

    Still, if I was doing the job, I would try to first build a temp wall inside, and demo that wall and reframe it, before I started looking into jacking the structure.

    Good luck, and if you need any more help, feel free to post here again. :thumbsup:

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #732715

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Another way to tackle this, and once again, it might be a bit much for a DIY project, depending on how determined you are, 😆 but you can build a temp wall inside the garage, a couple feet back from the existing wall, cut the bottom 18ā€³ or so inches off the existing wall, lay 2 courses of block, fill with grout, slide a new PT sill plate down, and toe nail the studs to it.

    This is what I had in mind and not jacking up the side of the garage. That could be a bad idea.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #732728

    Thank you very much pros for the advice! I might have to get help from the contractor. 😎😎😎

    #732731

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Another way to tackle this, and once again, it might be a bit much for a DIY project, depending on how determined you are, 😆 but you can build a temp wall inside the garage, a couple feet back from the existing wall, cut the bottom 18ā€³ or so inches off the existing wall, lay 2 courses of block, fill with grout, slide a new PT sill plate down, and toe nail the studs to it.

    This is what I had in mind and not jacking up the side of the garage. That could be a bad idea.

    He should pick the most rotted wall to start with, to work out his strategy. A temp wall would give him time to execute. If he has plumbing and electrical conduits coming up the wall it will take more finessing when cutting the rotted legs off.

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