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How To: Align your Bosch table saw Blade, Fence and Miter track

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  • #737278

    It’s the GTS10 XC Pro.
    I think that it has a few issues with the fence not being aligned to the blade but also the fence itself not being totally vertical. This is giving me a few problems which smaller pieces (400mm X 30mm X 30mm) not being square in several directions. Not by a huge amount but as I’m making chopping boards, these inaccuracies are multiplying and building up!
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    #737313

    It’s the GTS10 XC Pro.
    I think that it has a few issues with the fence not being aligned to the blade but also the fence itself not being totally vertical. This is giving me a few problems which smaller pieces (400mm X 30mm X 30mm) not being square in several directions. Not by a huge amount but as I’m making chopping boards, these inaccuracies are multiplying and building up!
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    I’m not sure about that one , I found these on Google
    But I’ll tag another member here who has the similar NA model
    @cmeyer25 might be able to chime in and give his insight because he has a similar model.

    #737318
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    It’s the GTS10 XC Pro.
    I think that it has a few issues with the fence not being aligned to the blade but also the fence itself not being totally vertical. This is giving me a few problems which smaller pieces (400mm X 30mm X 30mm) not being square in several directions. Not by a huge amount but as I’m making chopping boards, these inaccuracies are multiplying and building up!
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    I’m not sure about that one , I found these on Google
    But I’ll tag another member here who has the similar NA model
    @cmeyer25 might be able to chime in and give his insight because he has a similar model.

    I think I’ve adjusted my fence once because it was getting a little loose on the outfeed end, but other than that I haven’t had any issues with it not being square enough. But I also haven’t really used it for anything that ended to be that precise.

    Although, I did test the blade against my woodpecker squares and it seemed be be as accurately square as I could tell, so I think it’s good as far as that goes.

    I don’t k ow of any way to fix the fence not being square to the table – that seems like a manufacturing defect and possibly irreparable. Parallel to the blade though I know can be fixed. I’m sure the user manual for the saw would be the directions for that.

    Charlie
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    #737338
    CB
    Pro

    It’s the GTS10 XC Pro.
    I think that it has a few issues with the fence not being aligned to the blade but also the fence itself not being totally vertical. This is giving me a few problems which smaller pieces (400mm X 30mm X 30mm) not being square in several directions. Not by a huge amount but as I’m making chopping boards, these inaccuracies are multiplying and building up!
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    I don’t have any model of Bosch table saw, but will offer the following suggestions that are generally applicable regardless of type of table saw.

    You mentioned two different vertical planes:
    1. The blade
    2. The fence

    Since the blade is mounted on an adjustable trunnion, adjusting the perpindicularity of the blade to the table should be doable, regardless of any manufacturing irregularities related to the fence.

    For the easiest to measure method of zeroing out the a true vertical position for the adjustable trunnion, consider investing in a verified dead flat plate, and mounting it to the arbor shaft in lieu of the blade when making adjustments.

    A dead flat plate makes it far easier to hold a framing square between the plate (substituting for the blade) and the table as you slowly rotate the arbor (power off, saw unplugged) throughout the entire 360 degrees of arbor shaft rotation, looking for any precession (rotational axis deviation) in the arbor shaft, at the same time as establishing the vertical plane to set the zero marker on.

    There are three distinct advantages to the verified flat plate, which you can have made at a machine shop, or purchase commercially, at woodworking places like Rockler.

    The first and foremost advantage is that the plate has no teeth to have to dance around to fit the framing square inbetween.

    The second advantage is that a larger framing square can be used, to capture more of the table plane, bridging across any slots or zero clearance plate anomalies.

    The third advantage of the dead flat plate is that in reality, blades are not always flat. I’ve received brand new, never used blades that were not truely flat, nevermind the fact that heat from use, nicks from nails, burning through knots, stalling through misfeeding, and other usage events can alter the tension in blades, turning them into taco shells that the human eye can’t see, but that a professional saw blade sharpener can measure with simple instruments.

    with that said, if a job really requires precision, do take the blades you plan to use for that job to your local blade sharpener, and ask that the blades be tested for trueness. Seriously. I’ve used the same blade sharpening service for 38 years. Buy a new few blades from them, have them sharpen your old blades, and then a relationship is established that makes it much easier to ask for a truing test once in a while when the work needs to be tighter than a knat’s crack.

    With the arbor set true, and the blade tested flat, the first vertical plane is thus resolved. This is the most important vertical plane, as this is what does the cutting.

    The second vertical plane is the fence. If your fence is tilting this way or that vertically, where the top of the fence is further away from, or closer towards, the blade than the bottom of the fence, then this difference results in an angle, and that angle can be easily canceled with a sacrificial length of material attached to the fence.

    There are a couple of caveats to this workaround:

    A)the off angle must remains the same throughout the lateral range of fence movement needed between the actual cutting width, and the cutting width plus the thickness of the sacrificial spacer, and

    B) {sorry, I had a phone call at this moment and lost my train of thought, so this is a place marker in case I think of it again before this post can no longer be edited}, and

    C) this presumes that the fence is off only on the vertical plane, and that their are no yaw deviations front to back of the fence in relation to the blade.

    So, set your fence to the desired 30mm width cut, and run your sacrificial material through. A smooth surface product like MDF is preferable. My fence attachments are actually melamine, but I have fence that can be trued mechanically.

    Now attach your just cut sacrificial piece to your fence. The angles cancel each other.

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    #737341

    Thank you so much for this. I’m working my way through all these suggestions trying to fix / work out what is wrong. I’ll be speaking to Bosch in the next day or two to see if they can help with the non-vertical fence. The saw is only a couple of months old and I don’t think that I should have to glue a 1mm sliver of wood under one side of the locking mechanism (as I have) to get it vertical!

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