dcsimg

How do you cope and stick?

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  • #521433
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Just wondering how others are set up for making cabinet doors as far as router tables and setup go.

    Do you use a single table, tearing down and setting up for each batch of cuts? Use two separate tables to keep from tearing down and setting up all the time?

    While I was actively building kitchens for a couple years in my own shop, I decided I was taking up too much time reconfiguring things between routing process’s. Decided to come up with a two-head table that could be left set up and only used for building cabinet doors.

    Case was made from some melamine stock left over from another project, built 4 drawers – 2 for each end to store bits, extra router plates, wrenches, etc. The top was made using a base layer of 3/4″ BB ply with a top layer of 1/2″ BB ply, the plates that I made worked out fine to just oversize the hole in the 1/2″ BB ply and rest on the smaller cut-out in the 3/4″ BB ply underneath.

    Added a couple 4″ DC ports in the sides, and shopvac DC hoses to the top-side. A shop-made coping sled in there also.

    That setup would stay in place with no adjustments for months at a time. Took up a good amount of floorspace in the shop, but worth it in the long run for my needs by cutting down on setup time.

    Easy enough to tear down when needed to set up another fence system for ‘ornamental’ joinery type stuff between cabinet jobs.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #521441
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    We do not do it as a regular operation so we set up each batch. In a cabinet shop, I could see a big advantage of having separate machines.

    #521482
    Doobie
    Moderator

    That’s a nice setup. Hats off to you building that.

    Myself as a hobbiest only have my Jessem setup, which works pretty good for me. You seem to have almost a production need.

    One quickie observation is that overhead hose. If I’m not mistaken, it likely has corrugated/ribbed inner walls. Trust me, get some with smooth inner walls that of course costs more, but for what is a critical area makes a huge diff typically with collection.

    I like how you laminated the top so thick and used BB. This is often an area of frustration otherwise with sagging tops otherwise.

    What do you have have set up for collection below the table. This is typically an area left unheeded and typically leads to shortened router life as the router has its bottom inlet holes in their unintended natural position facing upwards where debris gets to enter and causes issues inside the motor casing. Running MDF is the worst for this issue to rear its ugly head in this regard.

    #521491
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Ahh this is where you use the plastic plates, after seeing your set up, i may have to go buy some plastic to make a router table, it is one thing my shop is lacking.

    #521508
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Just what I want to share with the under table extraction on my Jessem.

    Yes, it’s a bitch to get effective extraction down there and this setup is not perfect. On some types of runs depending on what I’m running and other nuances like router bit type and the relative height, it is not 100% at times leaving some waste below the table still.

    #521535
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    As a hobbyist, I typically tear down and set up for each profile. I do run extra stiles and rails to cover the inevitable screw up.

    I do need to update my table to include DC from underneath. My fence with a 2 1/2″ port is the only DC right now.

    Stan, I do like your setup, but you’re right, it does take up a lot of space.

    That woodstove I see in the corner there would be a welcome addition to my shop. Too bad my insurance would never agree.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #521553
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I’ve only done it a handful of times, so it’s a single table set up for me. I really dont have the space in my current shop to have a dedicated area (and two tables) that stay set for doors.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #521559
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Kevin that last picture looks like a very nice set up.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #521561
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Just wondering how others are set up for making cabinet doors as far as router tables and setup go.

    That’s a nice looking setup you have there. I have wanted to do something similar for a while now in my shop. I just haven’t taken the time. Coming from and having full accuse to the cabinet shop that has four shaper’s set full time to run doors. It tough to do tear down and set up for each process.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #521640
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Ahh this is where you use the plastic plates, after seeing your set up, i may have to go buy some plastic to make a router table, it is one thing my shop is lacking.

    Local company that has the plastic sheets in stock had a variety of types, and all were very reasonably priced. Think the clear plates were about $7.00 per 12X12″ piece.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #521642
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    As a hobbyist, I typically tear down and set up for each profile. I do run extra stiles and rails to cover the inevitable screw up.

    I do need to update my table to include DC from underneath. My fence with a 2 1/2″ port is the only DC right now.

    Stan, I do like your setup, but you’re right, it does take up a lot of space.

    That woodstove I see in the corner there would be a welcome addition to my shop. Too bad my insurance would never agree.

    The making extra stiles/rails sounds pretty familiar.

    That woodstove has been fed a number of the pieces the ‘extras’ have replaced in the past.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #522942
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Ahh this is where you use the plastic plates, after seeing your set up, i may have to go buy some plastic to make a router table, it is one thing my shop is lacking.

    There are much fancier plates to drop a router under a table, but these have served me well. Not sure if you can see it in th picture, but two are fitted to accept PC bearing guides for various projects.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #525192
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    A bit more information on the plates. The original baseplate for the router was laid out after centering the bit hole in the plate. All mounting and adjusting holes were then drilled in the new plate.

    For this plate you can see the hole drilled for the through the base bit height adjustment wrench. The bit hole was sized for a standard 3/4″ flush trim bit.

    I’m pretty much at a point now when I need a new plate/bit setup – I just buy a new router and set it up with the bit and make a custom plate for it. 🙂

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #525392

    That’s a nice looking setup you have there. I have wanted to do something similar for a while now in my shop. I just haven’t taken the time. Coming from and having full accuse to the cabinet shop that has four shaper’s set full time to run doors. It tough to do tear down and set up for each process.

    I am in the same situation – I have access to a full time cabinet shop which has 3 shapers set up all the time for this. It may seem like cheating but the shop is 5 minutes away and it is a huge time savings for me. I like what you did there MTroads. Unfortunately, like other woodworking setups, the best ones require more room or more money or both.

    #525527
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    That’s a nice looking setup you have there. I have wanted to do something similar for a while now in my shop. I just haven’t taken the time. Coming from and having full accuse to the cabinet shop that has four shaper’s set full time to run doors. It tough to do tear down and set up for each process.

    I am in the same situation – I have access to a full time cabinet shop which has 3 shapers set up all the time for this. It may seem like cheating but the shop is 5 minutes away and it is a huge time savings for me. I like what you did there MTroads. Unfortunately, like other woodworking setups, the best ones require more room or more money or both.

    Fully understand that. As it is I have an older Delta 1hp shaper that I need to rebuild from the ground up to put in my shop. I have no idea right now where I will put it – but where there is a will, there is a way. 🙂

    And no, I don’t consider that cheating. More like an efficient use of resources.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #526106
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    More use of the plastic pieces I picked up for router bases. I looked at the price on coping sleds and figured I would use one of the plates for that.

    A piece of hickory for the ‘fence’ with a sacrificial piece screwed in from the bottom in front of it for the particular router bit profile. Holes in the bottom were counter-sunk to keep from scratching the router top.

    A couple toggle clamps from Harbor Freight for about $6.00 each, and I have a coping sled for around $15.00 total.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #526196

    That is one sweet and simple sled Stan. I like how you have the sacrificial piece that can be trimmed and used for the next profile.

    #526640
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    That is one sweet and simple sled Stan. I like how you have the sacrificial piece that can be trimmed and used for the next profile.

    Simple can be good at times, but after looking at some of the commercial ones after this one was made – I think a good/sturdy hand grip that would provide more control might be on the next version.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #526674

    I think a good/sturdy hand grip that would provide more control might be on the next version.

    Yes, that is a very desirable feature. I missed that until you mentioned it.

    #526803
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    More use of the plastic pieces I picked up for router bases. I looked at the price on coping sleds and figured I would use one of the plates for that.

    A piece of hickory for the ‘fence’ with a sacrificial piece screwed in from the bottom in front of it for the particular router bit profile. Holes in the bottom were counter-sunk to keep from scratching the router top.

    A couple toggle clamps from Harbor Freight for about $6.00 each, and I have a coping sled for around $15.00 total.

    Good little sled, Stan. Simple is always best.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

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