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How do you clean your rusty machinesor tools

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Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 96 total)
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  • #361742
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Does it matter what soap you use for the electrolyte, or is it specific? Maybe clr would work well, since it’s supposed to remove rust as well

    #361961

    You’ll want to use sodium carbonate as your electrolyte. The easiest, and most commonly available example would be “Arm & Hammer Washing Soda”

    I use a 10% solution (1 part sodium carbonate to 10 parts water) and it works fine. The sodium carbonate is not as corrosive as some materials and less hazardous to use, so its a good choice for an electrolyte.

    Does it matter what soap you use for the electrolyte, or is it specific? Maybe clr would work well, since it’s supposed to remove rust as well

    #362192
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Thank you, i will give that a try!

    #362196

    Here are a couple of good links to the process. Hope it helps.

    http://users.eastlink.ca/~pspencer/nsaeta/electrolysis.html

    http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/andyspatch/rust.htm

    Thank you, i will give that a try!

    #421596
    yellaD
    Pro

    I use 3 methods depending on what it is

    1. Bead Blaster, fast and thorough

    2. WD-40 Rust Remover this is a soak thourough but takes 24 hours. You need a container to big enough for the part.

    3. Feed Molasses mixed 20 parts water to 1 part Feed Molasses. I keep a 5 gal bucket ready with this mixture in it. dump in the parts and a week or so later no rust.

    They all work, just depends on what I need at the time. The soaks do not change the base metal appearance, while bead blasting leaves a bit of sheen or a slight finish to the surface.

    I buy the citric acid at a wine making shop, there should be no grease on your parts, I left the drill parts about a week. I seen the molasses on utube works great also. What I like about the baths is you are not creating that fine rust dust. I have a sand blaster never used it yet, have the bandsaw I want to blast and paint, but hate to take apart a good functional machine. Never seen the wd rust remover.

    Wow we have a wine making shop around here, On the no grease comment are you saying to remove the grease before the bath? I used to always glass bead my stuff but I don’t have access to one anymore, This molasses idea is new to me also.

    Great tips guys! You said the citric acid is about $10/kg? How long would that last? Also, do you dump the bath after use, and where? Those were amazing results!!

    #461442
    staker
    Pro

    Haven’t been here for awhile. I usually use about 1/2 kilo to about 10 gallons of water. I also mix some in a spray bottle. I just dump it outside on the lawn.

    #461455
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    Where do you get citric acid from ?

    #461478
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Where do you get citric acid from ?



    @cranbrook2
    ,
    John you can get it on line (cheaper & larger quantities) or check out your nearest Bulk Barn, that is where I buy mine when I need a cup or less.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #461490
    staker
    Pro

    I buy it from a wine making supply store.

    #461722
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Probably the same action as citric acid, but I use vinegar. Cleaning vinegar or 10% is the most effective, I found. An overnight soak will take off just about anything.

    Adding salt to the vinegar makes it faster and more effective.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #461782
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Probably the same action as citric acid, but I use vinegar. Cleaning vinegar or 10% is the most effective, I found. An overnight soak will take off just about anything.

    Adding salt to the vinegar makes it faster and more effective.

    10% cleaning vinegar is a good less expensive way to go.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #461790
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    This showed up this morning …. worth watching.
    Posted also in Vintage Tools..

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #461817

    Very cool, I have played with using several of the techniques mentioned, I am looking forward to trying the citric acid technique.

    Will

    #461820
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Anybody use bead blasting to clean up old tools?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #461882
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    This showed up this morning …. worth watching.
    Posted also in Vintage Tools..

    Great video Peter. Got to wonder what his “flat Block” is?

    Anybody use bead blasting to clean up old tools?

    Not for tools but for bumper brackets and other heavy metal.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #461889
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Evaporust works pretty well… I use it for the big machines with big surfaces. For smaller projects I have an electrolysis tank that works great.

    #461904
    whitehill
    Pro
    Ottawa, ON

    This showed up this morning …. worth watching.
    Posted also in Vintage Tools..

    Great video Peter. Got to wonder what his “flat Block” is?

    Fairly certain it’s a granite surface plate:
    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32526&cat=1,43513,51657

    Thanks for the video. Have some yard sale planes to fix up.

    #461922
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    smallerstick wrote:
    This showed up this morning …. worth watching.
    Posted also in Vintage Tools..
    Great video Peter. Got to wonder what his “flat Block” is?

    I agree, granite was my first thought.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #461930

    For old hand tools, I soak in white vinegar. Adding salt makes it go faster, but I just use the vinegar plain. A gallon at Walmart is $3, and you can use it multiple times depending how dirty the tools are. After they soak for typically a day or two, a wire brush on an angle grinder or dremel cleans up the surface very nice. I had an old set of C-clamps I got at a yard sale I had to leave in for a week, but they still cleaned up beautiful, just a quick wire brushing and sprayed with the T9 anti-rust/lubricant. The attached picture shows one before and one after.

    #473368
    Clev08
    Pro

    I put a fence up for a lady who had rust free garden tools. She said she soaked them in vinegar every year to remove the rust

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 96 total)
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