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How do you clean your rusty machinesor tools

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This topic contains 95 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  theamcguy 1 year, 4 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 96 total)
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  • #222988

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    WOW, some great tips. I especially like the citric acid and the feed molasses. VERY COOL.

    Thanks!

    Brad feed molasses works great as long as you are not in a hurry. Just get you a 5 gal bucket or a 32 gallon plastic trash can if it is really big, pour in the feed molasses, add water add the part. You’ll see a rusty foam rise to the top of the bucket then you know it is working. Wait one week sometimes two if it is really rusty, remove rinse and blow dry with compressed air admire your new rust free part/tool. It is the cheapest method out there.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #246598

    Thanks for the tips. I need to get my table saw back in shape.

    #246607

    Did not see this thread originally. Wow, I am impressed with how that drill-press came out – looks brand new. Great tips on this thread.

    Orange County, CA

    #287144

    Anonymous

    I usually clean my machine tops with a cream polisher and then wax them every month or when needed. This way your not fighting the resistance of a bad table top when machining. On occasion if one gets a little rusty I’ll polish it off with wetory paper first.

    #287201

    KenW
    Pro

    I’ve never heard of using feed molasses before. Interesting to see the rust foam off.

    #287343

    Always heard sugar was bad on the teeth, but wow!

    #287504

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I’ve never heard of using feed molasses before. Interesting to see the rust foam off.

    It really does. I just put a tool or whatever in my bucket come back a week later to check on it and scrape off the rust foam and find a clean tool. If it needs a bit more time I leave it for another week or so.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #287515

    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    Electrolytic.
    I came across a pair of electrician’s pliers buried in the dirt the other day – probably been there for decades.
    It may be beyond recovery, but I’ll get before and after shots some time this week.
    Saw tables get scrubbies and wax.

    #342461

    sergey061478
    Blocked

    thanks for great ideas everyone. drill press looks awesome. i will try molasses stuff soon.

    #354441

    Building an electrolysis bath to de-rust some parts from the Unisaw restoration project that I am currently working on.

    12V – 5A power supply attached to a submerged sheet metal electrode and sunk to the part being rusted. Used simple solution of water and arm and hammer washing soda as the electrolyte.

    #354741

    BryanT
    Blocked
    Lake Ariel, PA

    Building an electrolysis bath to de-rust some parts from the Unisaw restoration project that I am currently working on.

    12V – 5A power supply attached to a submerged sheet metal electrode and sunk to the part being rusted. Used simple solution of water and arm and hammer washing soda as the electrolyte.

    Wow, you are really taking it to whole new level. Would you mind describing further how does this process work? I would appreciate that a lot.

    BryanT

    #355029

    My space has been unheated, and almost unweatherproof (is that a word?) up until now. I have had to do regular upkeep to keep the saw top protected. When I see the rust starting to come I use WD-40 and 400 grit wet/dry on it, then a good coating of paste wax (with no silicone….Johnson’s, Trewax, Minwax, Mothers Carnuba car wax all will work)

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #355206

    BryanT
    Blocked
    Lake Ariel, PA

    My space has been unheated, and almost unweatherproof (is that a word?) up until now. I have had to do regular upkeep to keep the saw top protected. When I see the rust starting to come I use WD-40 and 400 grit wet/dry on it, then a good coating of paste wax (with no silicone….Johnson’s, Trewax, Minwax, Mothers Carnuba car wax all will work)

    Thanks for the good advice. I would never think of using car wax to protect some tools. However, it does make a lot of sense since car was is designed to protect.

    BryanT

    #355588

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    My space has been unheated, and almost unweatherproof (is that a word?) up until now. I have had to do regular upkeep to keep the saw top protected. When I see the rust starting to come I use WD-40 and 400 grit wet/dry on it,

    I have found WD-40 works for me too. I can get a few months out of it just using that. I will try the wax now that several have mentioned it as lasting a bit longer.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #355755

    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    <P>Building an electrolysis bath to de-rust some parts from the Unisaw restoration project that I am currently working on.</P>
    <P>12V – 5A power supply attached to a submerged sheet metal electrode and sunk to the part being rusted. Used simple solution of water and arm and hammer washing soda as the electrolyte. </P>

    <P>Wow, you are really taking it to whole new level. Would you mind describing further how does this process work? I would appreciate that a lot.</P>

    It works great, and is cheap and easy.
    Losing electrons is oxidation.
    You are pumping electrons in with the voltage source.
    The process will not remove pitting which is a loss of the base metal. It >will< remove rust. Using a wire brush first on heavily rusted parts will give you a head start.
    There are many descriptions of the process on the web – DAGS. Also some Youtube videos.

    #360892

    BryanT
    Blocked
    Lake Ariel, PA

    <P>Building an electrolysis bath to de-rust some parts from the Unisaw restoration project that I am currently working on.</P>
    <P>12V – 5A power supply attached to a submerged sheet metal electrode and sunk to the part being rusted. Used simple solution of water and arm and hammer washing soda as the electrolyte. </P>

    <P>Wow, you are really taking it to whole new level. Would you mind describing further how does this process work? I would appreciate that a lot.</P>

    It works great, and is cheap and easy.
    Losing electrons is oxidation.
    You are pumping electrons in with the voltage source.
    The process will not remove pitting which is a loss of the base metal. It >will< remove rust. Using a wire brush first on heavily rusted parts will give you a head start.
    There are many descriptions of the process on the web – DAGS. Also some Youtube videos.

    Thank you very much for sharing. I appreciate that.

    BryanT

    #360899

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Building an electrolysis bath to de-rust some parts from the Unisaw restoration project that I am currently working on.

    12V – 5A power supply attached to a submerged sheet metal electrode and sunk to the part being rusted. Used simple solution of water and arm and hammer washing soda as the electrolyte.

    How big if a tank did you build? The negative I see here is getting things wet that shouldn’t be. Electrolysis works very well for non sensitive applications.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #360906

    Built a large tank, capable of holding table saw extension wings, and a smaller tank for smaller parts.

    Plastic totes are great for this purpose. For small parts, you can use anything from old plastuc cat litter containers to small totes. I use a steel mesh pouch to put parts like small bolts, nuts, etc and then sink the negative electrode to the mesh.

    Building an electrolysis bath to de-rust some parts from the Unisaw restoration project that I am currently working on.

    12V – 5A power supply attached to a submerged sheet metal electrode and sunk to the part being rusted. Used simple solution of water and arm and hammer washing soda as the electrolyte.

    How big if a tank did you build? The negative I see here is getting things wet that shouldn’t be. Electrolysis works very well for non sensitive applications.

    #361656

    Used one of these when getting the thick layer of rust off the cast iron table of one of my restoration saws. It is extremely effective and doesn’t damage the top at all. I was surprised at how well it cut through.

    I buy the blades in boxes of 100, so all in all, not a bad little tool to add to the collection.

    Attachments:
    #361677

    staker
    Pro

    I have never tried the electrolysis yet maybe this year, it is suppose to work great at removing old paint as well.

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